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9

Jerky can be rehydrated. Soak it in liquid, the way you would mushrooms, until it becomes somewhat plump. It will remain a little chewy and keep a lot of its flavor. Chop it up and cook it into a stew. It will give a unique flavor and texture and the stew will dilute the spiciness- hopefully to a manageable level. Look for recipes for "backpacker's stew" ...


9

For me it very much depends on what meat I am making jerky out of. With the grain is much more solid than against. Just as you might expect. If you are using relatively tender meat then cutting across the grain will result in a batch of jerky crumbs. Cutting with the grain will be good. If you are using very tough meat then cutting with the grain will be ...


9

This is Alton Brown's recipe for homemade beef jerky.


7

"Proteiny" usually indicates "umami", the so-called "fifth flavor" after sweet, sour, bitter, and salty. It's triggered by glutamates. Common sources of umami include beef, mushrooms, some seaweeds (most especially nori), rinds of some hard cheeses (most especially pecorino romano) and tomato paste. I wouldn't be at all surprised if the store-bought ...


6

It depends on how moist you like your jerky. A typical jerky loses half of its starting weight in moisture, so 2:1 is the proper ratio. "Low moisture" jerky can actually be 1/3 the starting weight, a 3:1 ratio. So 2-3 pounds of beef will make 1 pound of jerky.


5

Marinating your meat makes it safer primarily by introducing it to salt, which kills bacteria. It is possible to make jerky safely without it, though you need to be careful. You should use lean meat; fat is the most likely component in the meat to go bad. It's also important to regulate the temperature closely and make sure hold the meat at temperature for ...


5

There are several options: wrap jerky in paper napkins/towels before putting in the baggie put jerky in a paper bag and then in a plastic one put some uncooked rice, as Optionparty has mentioned The method you choose also depends on how long it takes the mail to be delivered. Rice is the most long-lasting way, but it will also add the most weight to the ...


4

What about tofu? It can be "jerkyfied" pretty easily. For example: http://www.ehow.com/how_2128547_make-tofu-jerky.html


4

You can also crust the meat with salt, removing the crust after dehydrating (or smoking). The goal is to pull the moisture out, and to season Note that traditionally, some bacons and hams are preserved by burying the meat in coarse salt, then hanging + smoking. You can jerk in the same manner, by using salt to pull out the moisture, then remove from ...


4

I'd personally go with Sobachatina's method of using it as an ingredient in something else. (it's also good to chop up some and add to cooked rice or rice & some veg. as a one pot meal) ... but if you really wanted to try to save as jerky, you might be able to tone it down a little by adding some sweetness to it. Unfortunately, this might mean ...


4

Yes, you can make beef jerky with a dehydrator, or at a very low temp in the oven. It's really more curing than cooking. If you're asking this because of the high price of beef jerky, remember that most of beef is water. It takes about 5 pounds of beef to make 1 pound of jerky. Unlike steaks, you want really lean meat for beef jerky (at least if you don't ...


4

You could do it as others have mentioned on the lowest setting, You want a temp around 150 degrees F (65 degrees C). When you do this prepare for drippings. Cut the meat about 50 to 75% thicker than you want the finished product. To thin will turn it into paper. We soak our meat in a soya sause, sugar, garlic & pepper brine. To add different flavor we ...


4

I believe you will want to use the lowest setting on your oven and have the oven door propped open so the moisture has a place to go and to keep from cooking the meat.


3

I just found the recipe for it. The name of it is Bak Kwa (Sweet BBQ Pork Jerky). Here's the wikipedia entry (boy it's easy to find things when you know the name!). The recipe actually grind up the pork. They use about 70% meat and 30% fat. But according to the wikipedia entry there is also an expensive version where they slice of a solid piece of meat. ...


3

I have had great success with Lex Rooker's $10 cardboard box dehydrator, powered by a light bulb. Temperature stays around 120 degrees, which seems to really make a better flavor than higher temperatures. I agree with the comments on fat content. Eye of round has been the best non-sinewy lean cut for me. ...


2

A recipe I use all the time which is delicious and easy is: - 125g hoisin sauce 75g tomato puree 35g tomato ketchup 2 tbsp honey 2 tbsp sweet chilli sauce 2 tbsp soy sauce 2 tbsp fresh ginger, finely grated (optional) 2 cloves garlic, finely grated Juice of 2 limes 2 pinches of chilli powder French parsley to garnish My suggestion would be to use some ...


2

I have to admit that I haven't tried a lot of free-form jerky experiments so take what I say with a grain of salt. (see what I did there?) Jerky is a double action meat preservation method. You soak the meat with way too much salt and then dehydrate it. Bacteria don't stand a chance. As Alton says in that episode "Club med becomes club dead". Not one of his ...


2

Try using low-sodium soy sauce, or possibly teriyaki sauce instead. You might also try reducing the amount of salt but increasing the curing time.


2

In the US, commercial jerky is inspected by the Food Safety and Inspection Service help ensure safety. See the FSIS Compliance Guideline for Meat and Poultry Jerky Produced by Small and Very Small Establishments for detailed information on commercial jerky preparation methods, which must include a "lethality" step based on heat, acidity, or other means ...


2

stilltasty.com gives you 3-5 days in the fridge for fresh, raw venison.


1

I have done the same thing a rather enjoyed it, thats just my opinion. I agree with chopping it up and making a stew or my personal favorite making a Texas chili from it. Either way you cant go wrong.


1

I do it both ways in a single batch. If you cut across the grain you end up with a more crumbly product. It's easier to bite off say a quarter of a stick of it and chew it. If you cut with the grain, it's chewier. It may be harder to bite a piece off neatly. It tends to take longer to eat it, which for me is a feature, not a bug. (When canoeing, I like to ...


1

Two methods of protecting you from bacteria chemically, is with vinegar and sugar (brown). These are not sure fire remedies. Five minutes of boiling prior to drying is a mechanical method as is ten minutes of oven heating to 175 degrees after drying. Salt cure curing is a safe bet too and if you want less salt after curing add potato slices to the mixture ...


1

I've tried making jerky at home and at the end of the day you have to spend 4 hours doing it, it usually costs twice as much what you have to pay for it online or in the store. I've used this recipe before and it was pretty tasty "depending on your favorite flavor"- http://www.bowhunting.net/susieq/jerky.htm I prefer to buy the jerky, I've tried bulk beef ...



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