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26

If you juice your own carrots you would see how sweet your carrots actually are. When you juice a carrot, you are extracting the liquid portion (which contains the majority of the sugars) from the cellulose. Since the cellulose is somewhat flavorless — it tastes pretty much like paper pulp — you are essentially ...


23

Unfortunately, the simple answer you are looking for does not exist. There are books written about this subject, for example, the Handbook of Fruits and Fruit Processing or Processing Fruits: Science & Technology. Where I live, there are entire academic programs dedicated to commercial food processing, and fruit processing is no small part of that. ...


13

Some quick research indicates there are enzymes in freshly-squeezed juice that will degrade it fairly rapidly, and that they can be deactivated by heat. Of course, that also changes the flavor (especially since you're not going to be able to quickly heat and cool it, as it apparently only takes 30 seconds, but any method doable in a home kitchen will keep it ...


12

I do believe your answer can be found in this totally over the top experimental comparison of two juicers. There's loads of info there, but I think the relevant part is when the author discusses the actual yields for each juicer. For pineapple, the author finds the yield to be between 71% - 76% of the total mass of the pineapple. So give it a weigh, and you ...


12

Fruit contains lots of water. When you take a piece of fruit at home and press it, you end up with sugars, vitamins and other solids dissolved in water. Let's assume that 100 g of just-pressed juice has X g of water and 100-X g of juice. A manufacturer who sells juice can do several things. pasteurize the juice and sell it as-is. This is 100% juice, not ...


9

Short answer is no. Vitamins are organic compounds (that is, compounds based on a carbon skeleton) which are pretty small: most of them are formed by 20-30 atoms, not more than that. Mechanical stress, as well as thermic stress, can indeed interfere with the structure of big organic compounds such as proteins or DNA, which are called macromolecules and are ...


8

What they mean is that they took some grape juice and concentrated it by evaporating some of the water contained in it (a concentrate is juice in which the sugar content is increased at least of 50%). This is good for producers because concentrated juice has a lower volume, is easier/cheaper to stock/transport etc. When they bottle the juice, they then ...


7

Freezing juice will definitely not harm the juice itself, but it might harm your container if you're not careful. The juice can expand quite a bit during the freezing process, so make sure that your container isn't completely full before you freeze it. If the juice is already in a container (i.e. you bought it) then keep in mind that the container might ...


7

I recommend this juicer I have it and use it every week to make lemonade: Peel 6-8 lemons Add to juicer Mixing in a large pitcher, add water and sugar to taste. Refrigerate It's absolutely delicious. It's all I drink, no more soda. Last week I made cherry juice. De-pitted the cherries and repeted the same steps as above. I've also made carrot and ...


7

Sure, you can juice with a blender, as long as (a) the blender is of reasonably good quality and (b) you're not expecting the same kind of yield or quality you'd get with a juicer (electric or manual). You'll also need a very fine strainer, or cheesecloth if you're like me and hate any amount of pulp. You'll have to peel them first, and try to remove the ...


7

Whenever you're worried about something crisp being made soggy by something moist, the answer is usually fat. Brush the crust with butter or oil before you add the pears, and the oil will slow the absorption of water. Alternately, dry out your pears. Cook them a bit. Roll them in sugar to dry them out some. I'm surprised the pear juice is making it through ...


7

Apple juice will give you very little additional taste, but it will sweeten your smoothie. Especially filtered apple juice has a rather subtle flavor which is easily covered by other fruit flavors. Juice producers use this to make their juices cheaper - if a juice advertises 100% fruit, and a flavor from an expensive, non-juicy fruit like strawberries, it is ...


7

If your physician recommended the fresh apple juice specifically (and not, for example, bottled apple juice or eating apples, or just eating more fruit), you should ask him or her what the reasons for that recommendation are, and what reasonable alternatives you can use if you are finding it difficult to comply with the recommendation. Fresh apple juice is ...


7

No, you cannot substitute fresh apple juice. Some of the compounds found in apple juice are very volatile. They evaporate a few minutes after the juice is made, or are broken down by still-active enzymes or oxygenation. These processes don't happen in the whole apple, because these compounds don't come into contact with the wrong enzymes or oxygen before ...


7

Short of using an electric juicer, the squeeze press type of juicer is very popular for doing large quantities of citrus quickly and efficiently. They are both fast, and squeeze almost all of the available juice, getting the best of both worlds. These come in sizes that are best for limes, lemons, oranges, or even grapefruits.


6

There are two explanations usually given for why centrifugal juicers lose some of the nutritional value: frictional heating, supposedly from the higher speed of the moving parts (although it's never clearly explained where this comes into play, maybe from the juice splatting on the container) aeration of the juice (since there's usually more frothing with ...


6

The peel is certainly edible, it's up to you whether you use it or not. If you choose to not peel them, try using large, juicy guavas. The seeds are edible as well, but perhaps a bit annoying in juice. So perhaps you could put it through a sieve after it's juiced (when using a juicer). If you don't find them annoying, there is no problem in leaving them in. ...


6

Depends on what you're juicing. If you're juicing something like a lemon/lime for lemon/limeade, you can just strategically slice and squeeze to get all but a couple mLs of juice. If you're juicing something like an apple, you can cook it slightly and then use your food processor to make apple sauce, which can these be squeezed through a ...


6

The easiest way would be to use an actual juicing machine. Instead of just blending everything together, a juicer will separate the juice from the pulp. You're looking for something like this: http://www.amazon.com/Hamilton-Beach-67650-Mouth-Extractor/dp/B000FHQJ6C/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1292255706&sr=8-7 Juice goes out one end, pulp out the ...


6

Luckily you asked for an efficient way and not a clean way! My brother in California has numerous mature pomegranate trees on his property and squeezes the majority of the fruit each year to use for jelly. He uses a manual Hamilton Beach Orange juicer which he says does the best job of anything he's tried. He usually has between 16-20 gallons of juice a ...


6

You can neutralize the acidity of your drink by adding a half teaspoon of baking soda, but don't do this. Apart from fizzing up like a volcano, your lemon drink, or what is left of it, will taste pretty awful. What you want to do is reduce the perceived acidity. This can be done simply by adding more honey. I suggest adding a teaspoon at a time until it ...


6

For making large amounts of margarita, I've found it hard to beat a press like this one: It extracts almost all the juice in one easy movement. I don't see the benefit in a rotary juicer.


5

You say you are substituting the juices for milk. You have to ask yourself, what roles does milk play in the recipe, and how well will the juices in question fill those roles? What does milk contribute? The milk adds: Liquid, to gelatinize the starch in the flour to create the structure of the cake; the water will also contribute to some gluten ...


5

Apple cider has two meanings, but they both start with raw, pressed juice from crushed apples. Soft apple cider (normally just called cider) is simply the pressed juice, bottled. It is cloudy from suspended apple particles, and turns brown from the oxidation, much as apples themselves do when cut and exposed to air. Hard apple cider is an alcoholic ...


4

I do not think that there is a better way they not to squeeze the lemon until you need them :D Regardless, if you want to do testing and are concerned about the bitter notes that develop , I recommend doing the research with grapefruit instead as it turns bitter is a matter of minutes and has a much stronger bitter flavor then the lemons do. That way you ...


3

Your second link explains the main types of juicers. Here's another page with much the same information, including links to various brands of juicers. Centrifugal juicers first grate the food, then extract the juice by spinning a strainer basket at high speed. Masticating juicers use an auger in a sleeve to chew up the food and extract the juice by ...


3

Some juicers are better than other kinds for different things. A dedicated wheat grass juicers probably isn't going to juice spinach, carrots, and kale well. A centrifugal juice usually doesn't handle wheatgrass well and in general isn't supposed to be as efficient as some other kinds for leafy greens. A single-gear or double-gear masticating juicer works ...


3

There are several reasons for adding orange juice: The first is for flavor. The second is to act as an acid. Although in this particular case,the acid is already in the baking powder. All baking powder needs to act as a leavening agent is some kind of liquid. Unless you meant baking soda, in which case an acid is necessary for leavening. The third is to ...


3

You neutralize acid by adding a base. Generally bases are bitter tasting. Black tea is a base, as is baking soda (sodium bicarbonate). The problem is that when you add an acid to a base you get salts. What we call salt is NaCL, which is just one example of a salt, there are many others, and those salts can add all sorts of undesirable flavor combinations. So ...


3

I haven't tried this, but in theory, it can work: Try adding a couple of tablespoons of flaxseed oil, coconut oil (or any other healthy oil you'd drink) to the froth jar and swish around. It'll likely destabilize the foam. Additional Info: Foams are similar to emulsions and are usually caused by proteins. Many industrial processes use surfactants to ...



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