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9

The three types of appliances you have listed have different primary uses, and best purposes, although they have some overlap in their capabilities. Blenders. Good at, well, blending: making smoothies, pureeing soup, grinding nuts to butter, and at the high end, making frozen ice drinks. By far the best device for this purpose, but not very versatile. ...


9

Short answer is no. Vitamins are organic compounds (that is, compounds based on a carbon skeleton) which are pretty small: most of them are formed by 20-30 atoms, not more than that. Mechanical stress, as well as thermic stress, can indeed interfere with the structure of big organic compounds such as proteins or DNA, which are called macromolecules and are ...


8

To juice a pineapple without a juicer, cut off the rind and remove the fruit from the hard, inner core. Slice it up and pulverize the fruit in a blender or food processor with a few tablespoons of water. Filter through a screen colander if you want a lot of pulp, or line it with cheese cloth if you want less pulp.


7

No, you cannot substitute fresh apple juice. Some of the compounds found in apple juice are very volatile. They evaporate a few minutes after the juice is made, or are broken down by still-active enzymes or oxygenation. These processes don't happen in the whole apple, because these compounds don't come into contact with the wrong enzymes or oxygen before ...


7

If your physician recommended the fresh apple juice specifically (and not, for example, bottled apple juice or eating apples, or just eating more fruit), you should ask him or her what the reasons for that recommendation are, and what reasonable alternatives you can use if you are finding it difficult to comply with the recommendation. Fresh apple juice is ...


7

Short of using an electric juicer, the squeeze press type of juicer is very popular for doing large quantities of citrus quickly and efficiently. They are both fast, and squeeze almost all of the available juice, getting the best of both worlds. These come in sizes that are best for limes, lemons, oranges, or even grapefruits.


6

For making large amounts of margarita, I've found it hard to beat a press like this one: It extracts almost all the juice in one easy movement. I don't see the benefit in a rotary juicer.


6

There are two explanations usually given for why centrifugal juicers lose some of the nutritional value: frictional heating, supposedly from the higher speed of the moving parts (although it's never clearly explained where this comes into play, maybe from the juice splatting on the container) aeration of the juice (since there's usually more frothing with ...


6

I've never juiced a pineapple, but I have done a watermelon and I've had some success with a food processor and a cheese cloth. I'd remove the core of the pineapple, because I don't think there's much juice in it. Remove the skin as well. Then run the pineapple through the food processor and pour all of the contents into a cheese cloth over a bowl. ...


5

It makes the lemon easier to squeeze. I think it has the most effect on the peel; it's softer and more flexible when warm, so you're able to get more juice out of it than you could otherwise if you're juicing by hand. That's especially true if you're trying to juice several lemons - you'll just get tired and stop being as thorough if it's harder. It ...


5

The way that i found to juice mine is leave the rind on, mash the melon to bits inside of it, cut a spout in the rind for easy pouring, line my stock pot with chese cloth (although i'm sure a lot of other things would form a great strainer), then just pour the whole thing into the stock pot. I then wrap the cheese cloth up and tie it off with a rubber band. ...


4

you know better than I do, it depends on the orange and type of orange. My mom, an executive chef, used to say that you'd allow 1-2 lb of oranges for 1 drinkable cup of orange juice. I really think, that it's highly dependent on the type of orange. I know naval and blood oranges are the juiciest compared to other varieties.


4

In my 900W microwave it takes 1/2 inch water 1 minute to boil and around 30 seconds to become hand-hot, (I know it may take a bit longer when heating a lemon with the skin acting like an insulator although this effect will be lessened due to the high oil content of the zest). You probably won't 'boil' the lemon however if you did it would produce by far the ...


3

I haven't tried this, but in theory, it can work: Try adding a couple of tablespoons of flaxseed oil, coconut oil (or any other healthy oil you'd drink) to the froth jar and swish around. It'll likely destabilize the foam. Additional Info: Foams are similar to emulsions and are usually caused by proteins. Many industrial processes use surfactants to ...


3

The amount of juice you get from an orange will depend on a number or things: Size of the orange Juice content of the orange Whether you use the pulp or remove all the bits May be you should be asking what oranges are best for producing the most amount of juice and how do I get the most juice from them? The easiest way to find out how many oranges you ...


3

Some juicers are better than other kinds for different things. A dedicated wheat grass juicers probably isn't going to juice spinach, carrots, and kale well. A centrifugal juice usually doesn't handle wheatgrass well and in general isn't supposed to be as efficient as some other kinds for leafy greens. A single-gear or double-gear masticating juicer works ...


3

The problem you are presenting is that "all fruit" that can be juiced covers a lot of ground. Nearly all fruit has some parts that need to be discarded, but it varies by fruit. As you noted, for oranges (and grapefruit, and lemons, and tangerines) it is the peel. For apples and pears, it is the peel and the core. For apricots and peaches, the pit. And ...


2

Basically, you have two types of fruit for juicing: Those with a rind (lemon, orange, grapefruit) and those without (strawberries, grapes, apples, etc). Non-rind fruits: Wash and use a vitamix (blender). Turn it into juice and pulp. If you don't want the pulp, pass it through a sieve or chinois. For citrus, the best juicer I've used are the manual press ...


2

Search engines like that, as you know, are more complicated to build than the standard recipe searches you see in most places, and many websites that have food recipes and are heavily utilized don't have them. If you want to ultimately be able to make juice based on the ingredients on hand, what I'd recommend is becoming more proficient at matching flavor ...


2

This depends on the type of juicer and how well it extracts the juice from the fruit. The best juicers leave a relatively flavourless pulp (which is, however, very high in fiber). If you're curious about the flavour, try tasting it! (I've heard of the pulp being used to make muffins, but other flavouring agents are definitely required). I am not sure about ...


2

I cannot think of any physical reason why this should be so, and I don't believe it Have you tried it? Buy two lemons, nuke one of them, and squeeze them both. Measure the juice that you get from each. Better, have someone else (who isn't aware that the lemons are different in any way) squeeze the lemons and tell you if they thought one was easier to ...


1

Since the question as it is written asks for speed, one of the devices mentioned above will definitely fit that bill. Especially if you are processing a large amount of citrus. Me personally, I'm not a huge fan of uni-taskers in the kitchen. Thus, I generally opt to: Roll the fruit in all directions while still whole. Apply a decent amount of pressure. ...


1

The best way I've found so far (for juicing) is to just thoroughly squeeze the pieces between thumb and forefinger over the flat part of the juicer chute so the juice flows down the chute and the seeds pop out for removal.


1

We have a twin-screw masticating juicer (an older model Angel juicer) and although the seeds come out quite chewed up, I wouldn't want to drink them and we've never put the pulp back into the juice. One possibility that comes to mind is to cut the oranges, etc., into pieces and separate out the pieces that have seeds from those that don't. Run the seedless ...


1

I found this comparison on juicer types. It claims that the oxidation (bubbles) created by the screen of the centrifugal juicer will result in great loss of nutrients due to oxidation. http://www.hacres.com/pdf/documents/other-juice-extractor-comparison-2007.pdf


1

I have no evidence to support this, but based on my understanding, it should be a great source of fiber, it definitely has "some" flavor and color (in many cases enough), no juicer is perfect so there are some remaining vitamins and other goodies that you expect from that fruit or veg in the first place that could be released (to be absorbed) by cooking. ...


1

We have a twin-screw masticating juicer (an older Angel juicer) and have found that when we make carrot juice, the pulp works well in carrot bread or carrot muffins. It's quite dry and it's finely shredded and ready to be mixed in to the bread.


1

Hydraulic press juices such as the Norwalk first grind the produce into a pulp, then press the juice out of the pulp. The theory is that malic acid in green apple pulp can release more vitamins and minerals from the other vegetables and fruit. The hydraulic press action squeezes more juice out than other types of juicers. But you're looking at $2500 for a ...


1

Champion-type macerating juicers work great on carrots; the teeth take them right apart, getting out all the juice and leaving behind a dry pulp. I've seen mixed reports on how well they work on leafy greens.


1

I can't remember how I ended up with a watermellon last year, but the approach I took to make a watermellon ice was: Cut the watermellon into slices Cut the watermellon from the rind. (but save the rind for watermellon pickles) Cut the watermellon flesh into cubes Put the cubes a few at a time into a bowl and beat the hell out of them with a potato ...



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