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7

The kefir grains are a culture of bacteria and yeast that are active at near-room temperatures. Their ideal temperature is 71F (22C). Below this and they will grow too slowly. Above this temperature, up to 86F, for extensive periods the grains will be damaged. http://users.chariot.net.au/~dna/kefir-faq.html#temperature Building the grains takes time- ...


5

Less complicated than the other method, but similar steps at the beginning. I have used two methods and both worked. I have heard success stories for grains in the freezer for over a year. No milk powder involved. Wash the grains in both cases. Methods: Put in fresh milk (the same you used before to make the kefir) and then freeze in a plastic ...


4

It could just be the difference in milk sources. Different cows, receiving variable types of feed, produce milk with varying nutritional content. They probably only tested kefir using milk from one or at most two sources. In comparison, the figures for normal milk could be drawn from hundreds of dairy farms across the nation. I would expect there to be ...


3

Kefir is often used as the agent in soaking grains, if you believe that soaking has health benefits (which is debatable). Even if you don't, soaking grains provides a unique texture to your baked goods. There are recipes for soaked bread, muffins, crackers, cookies, and more available on health food blogs. If you want to learn how to adapt favorite ...


3

Most of mine I make into smoothies and drink as you said. This is also the only way I saw it consumed in Russia. It can be interesting in baked goods. The same places you would use buttermilk you can use kefir. It gives an interesting yeasty flavor that works well in some recipes. For some time now I have been meaning to try straining it, sweetening, and ...


3

Serve as a drink along with potatoes fried on butter. Peeled, sliced potatoes fried to golden-browns on a frying pan, optionally with some thinly chopped dill, and a glass of chilled Kefir is the traditional slavic country cuisine dish, and the drink of sour, cold, slightly chunky Kefir versus hot, fat, crunchy potatoes provide the perfect golden middle ...


3

One method for storing kefir grains for periods of up to 2 months, is by freezing spare grains. To freeze effectively, wash the grains with pre-boiled COOLED water. Pat-dry the grains between pre-ironed cooled white toweling to remove excess moisture. Place the grains in a jar or in a plastic bag, seal and put in the freezer. With milk grains, first add some ...


2

Kefir grains are like sourdough starters - just not as common. It's kind of cheating to buy them- you get them from other people that are throwing away their extra. I got mine many years ago by finding a community mailing list and sending emails to a bunch of people asking to share. Unfortunately I have since lost the community that I used. This page: ...


2

Here is a source for organic kefir grains.


2

I have got a jar of kefir going that is made with whole milk powder. The grains seem to grow a lot faster then even with whole milk from the farmer. Try it, you don't have much to loose.


2

For good milk kefir grain growth use a shallow wide container to grow your kefir grains. This will give each of the grains more access to feed on the milk instead of clumping up at the top of a narrow jar and only a few being free in the milk. You can also stir the culturing kefir a few times during the day dispersing the kefir grains through the milk. Don't ...


2

I've successfully frozen and defrosted milk kefir grains. The defrosted kefir grains worked the first time culturing in fresh milk. I washed the kefir grains in filtered water till water was clear. Packed the washed kefir grains into zip lock snack bags with some plain filtered water and heat sealed the bag. I double bagged and heat sealed each bag. After 5 ...


2

Your options are either to change the milk or cover the taste with any type of sweeteners like sugar honey cinnamon nutmeg. If you make smoothies you can add all types of fruit. Don't worry about the sugar intake as the kefir should be suppressing your candida.


2

During the freezing process, ice crystals can cause cell damage to microorganisms. This means that a lot of the bacteria in your kefir may have died in the freezing process, leaving your culture significantly weakened. It may take a few batches to get it back up to full strength.


2

From this comment on a passionate homemaking article, the commenter suggests that 2 Tbsp per quart of milk is an appropriate amount of kefir grains. In my personal experience, I've found that the amount is fairly variable, and that half to twice that suggested amount will produce kefir relatively quickly (how quickly, of course, changes with the amount ...


1

The dynamics of the Grain growth are not currently well understood, much less its formation. Some researchers attempted to create grains in laboratory, but failed. There are over thirty or fourty strains of microbes in the kefir, and their ecological relationships are very complex. One could call the whole kefir culture an ecosystem of its own. The grains ...


1

Sounds like it "broke", as can happen with any dairy product. The protein in the kefir coagulated into the strings you are seeing. If you decide to try it again, try the highest fat kefir you can find, minimize acid in the dish, and incorporate the kefir at a relatively low temperature.


1

I made mine grow by adding it to half and half milk and then to cream. Alternated this and the tiny little grains were swollen like cauliflower pieces.


1

I can not give you an answer to your question, but whenever I had problems with kefir, I was told to thoroughly rinse the tuber and restart the kefir. On this German Website they recommend to restart with 200ml of milk and 1 tablespoon of lactose for a recovery of the kefir. I do not know if this could change the yeast to bacteria ratio. On a sideline, ...


1

There are many products that the nutritional value changes with aging and kefir is one such. You are growing good bacteria and yeast while fermenting and this adds to the milk's value. Also if you do a secondary fermentation you increase some of those values (like the B vit.) ck


1

You can also make Farmer's Cheese(aka Quark, a type of soft cheese) out of it. It will take a bit more watching than using regular cultured milk, but the end result is the same. You do pretty much the same thing as you would with cultured milk. The flavor may be a bit different, but is otherwise the same (still tastes good). In fact, all of the commercial ...


1

I followed a recipe for homemade ranch dressing. Thickened kefir was used instead of sour cream. It's barely thinner than bottled and tastes so much better.



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