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14

A great resource for how long foods can be kept is Stilltasty.com. According to them, commercially bottled pickles (and kimchee would fall into this category) can be kept after opening for one year in the refrigerator.


11

Korean chilli is a little different as it has a slight smoky flavour, in addition to being slightly sweet and also quite hot. The actual name of the chilli use in kimchi and for that matter, most Korean dishes is gochugaru (고추가루). It comes in a variety of preparations, typically, finely ground, flakes and a paste. You should be able to find this in most ...


6

Short answer is "yes". Sour pickles don't get sour because of yeast. Pickles get sour due to lactic acid produced by bacteria, the same way kimchi works. Propably you could even add a bit of real home-made yoghurt to boost the bacteria. The bacteria needed are already present on the cucumbers (even after you wash them, but you shouldn't srcub them too ...


6

Most Koreans won't eat kimchi if a) the veggies have become significantly mushy b) the juices taste 'sparkly', it's hard to describe this flavor exactly, but when you taste it, you'll know what I mean. A year seems like a long time for opened kimchi to me, but I would just use my tastebuds to assess the above.


5

When I go to the Korean supermarkets in LA, I usually see half an aisle just dedicated to 고추가루 in all kinds of forms (mild to spicy, fine to coarse grind) and colors. I don't know that there's any specific pepper than it is all about how sweet and mildly spicy 고추가루 is supposed to be. You could start from there to make your own by sun drying and crushing ...


5

Kimchi is rotten cabbage. It's already bad :) Seriously though, if it isn't moldy, it's probably fine. If you have the kind in the jar that has a carbonated taste, and it's still carbonated, it's fine.


4

If your jars aren't in the refrigerator already, I highly recommend unscrewing the lids as soon as possible...unless you want to be able to share stories about how you found glass shards and the smell of kimchi everywhere in your kitchen one day. Depending on when you mean to eat them, I'd recommend a mix of room temperature ripening and fridge storage. ...


4

In every Korean kitchen I have encountered, everyone has been extremely particular in that clean utensils should be used when extracting the kimchee from the jar, being very careful not to contaminate the kimchee. I have been told on many occasions that contaminating the kimchee can shorten the shelf life of the kimchee and taint the flavor. My family will ...


4

The pepper used in Kim chi is actually pretty variable. Not being able to find the genuine Korean powder locally, I've had good luck with 1.5 tablespoons Paprika, 0.5 teaspoon smoked Paprika, 0.5 teaspoon Arbol chili (a medium cayenne also works) per two quarts napa/bok choy etc. mix.


3

You'd be better off trying to find the real thing. Kochukaru is slightly sweeter and smokier than standard 'ground chilli' and simply substituting it will give you variable results to what your kimchi should traditionally taste like. If you know what you're doing, and by that I mean you are able to know what Kimchi is meant to taste like and are able to ...


2

Mc Cormick now makes Korean Red Pepper Flakes for sale at some Costcos (also in smaller containes at the Supermarket). I bought a large container and I am going back for more. Great flavor and heat for just about everything.


2

Answer depends on how the kim chi is made. I make it using a variant on this recipe. The protocol there is to treat the leaves with a salty brine for 4 hours, then rinse them extensively. No further salt is added in the recipe, so any salt in the final product will have osmosed into the leaves. Most of that salt won't come back out except with a prolonged ...


2

The Maesri brand will certainly work, as will many others. There are hundreds of kimchi recipes, and no version is any more authentic than another. Many contain whole or sliced fresh chiles (green and/or red) and may contain other ingredients, without any chile powder at all (sometimes called white kimchi). The first time I made red kimchi, the only thing ...


2

I made Napa Cabbage Kimchi about 2 and a half months ago and had two containers in the back of the fridge. One was half full in a plastic honey container and a full one. I was worried that it had spoiled by this time but when I tried it, it was delicious. I am not Korean but I have enjoyed really sour kimchi for a long time. I'm so stoked that I have another ...


1

When making kimchi (or other fermented products like it) it's best to ferment the whole batch together for the first phase (this depends on what you're making, how much of it you're making, and how sour you want it to be - but a week is a good rule of thumb). This helps to make the whole batch more consistent, as one batch will ferment at the same pace - as ...


1

Kimchi are not preferred to be added directly to soup. Usually you would fry the Kimchi (ideally in Sesame oil) to slightly transparent or having minor brown on the edges, before adding into the soup, and boil for . That is not only applicable to KimChi JiGae- but also other varieties of KimChi broth (e.g. hotpot, Kimchi ramen/noodles (BuDae JiGae) etc.) ...


1

Not at all. Heres a recipe you could try http://norecipes.com/blog/kimchi-jigae-recipe-kimchi-soup/


1

If you are unable to locate the real Korean pepper powder, I think you will have to make a blend of your own. Ancho chilis have a fairly similar flavor, but are not hot enough. So you would have to mix some amount of a hotter powder into ancho powder, and that could give you what you seek. Nothing is going to be perfect, but this can get you to a reasonable ...


1

It's really hard to find substitute because the way it is processed is different too. I'm not sure what the chilies are called but they are quite long and slender. The Korean ones are bright red and sweeter and the ones in western markets are pretty dark and bitter.


1

When I make kimchi, I usually leave it in a dark, cool corner of my utility room for 1-2 months before we start to eat it. We usually eat half the batch (1L) at once, then refrigerate. The second half is usually gone in a few weeks. Last night, however, we finished a batch that had been forgotten about and sat in the fridge for about 4 months. It tasted ...


1

"Bad" is a relative term for fermented pickles -- the whole point of the things is that they are a bit spoiled. It should get more sour/pricklier/funkier as time goes on and still be fine, but use your eyes and nose: if it gets stinky in some new and exciting way or looks strange, I'd avoid.


1

The difference may be the conditions the chili grew in. It's the same pepper, except it grew in a different place. In each recipe with hot chili, you can exchange it for any other kind of hot pepper, since most hot peppers are almost solely used for hotness and don't have much taste. You just need to adjust the quantities a bit so it would be as hot as you ...



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