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1

A day and a half is much too short for fermentation. It'll take 1-2 weeks and longer the better. It'll become sour when properly done.


2

I've been there, so I can tell you from experience that it is too late. The only thing you could do is mix it with a new batch of undersalted kimchi, but that is far more trouble than it is worth. Another option, which is highly dependent on how oversalted your kimchi is, would be to cook with it. If you do not salt the dish, you could use it in fried rice ...


1

Buy dried chilis and blend them into powder It sounds like this community doesn't know more about the specific peppers used (and their North American subsitutes) than what @janeylicious has proposed. Howeover, I propose a different methodology for finding a good fit. You can buy dried chilis of many varieties from Latino and sometimes American grocery ...


3

I figured out the problem myself. I used iodized salt. I was suppose to use sea salt or kosher. The fermentation prosess was inhibited by the iodine. I missed this tip the first time but when I looked at more recipes, I found it was a common practice. It took an extra day to show any activity but it is now going strong. Next time I will use sea salt or ...


3

Patience. Unless the weather is quite warm, a week is a more typical minimum fermentation time; three weeks if you use a refrigerator method.


1

Yes, you can buy just about anything from Amazon, but sometimes "the hard way" is more fun, and you get to put that much more love into your K-food. This is certainly not the authentic Korean method of making gochugaru, but it works for me, and my kimchi turns out great!: Find a relatively "fresh" bag of dried "Chiles Japones" in the Mexican/Hispanic ...


2

Kahm Yeast. Very common on pickled products "above the brine." Annoying but not actually hazardous. To avoid, make sure there is no "above the brine." Wikipedia "yeast" article: The appearance of a white, thready yeast, commonly known as kahm yeast, is often a byproduct of the lactofermentation (or pickling) of certain vegetables, usually the result ...


0

I'm a microbiologist in dairy. Only two things normally grow in such an acidic environment as kimchi. Yeast or fungi (mold). The two microorganisms are practically the same. Fungus is a mutiple-cell organism and yeast a single-cell organism. The two can change under influence of circumstances (such as temperature). So fungus can become yeast and the other ...



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