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22

even the greatest knife masters will forget every once in a while to clean with the edge in the opposite direction No, they won't, not after cutting themselves a couple of times. It's natural to cut yourself while cutting food, occasionally, but I have never cut myself while slipping food from the blade. Always keep the edge away from you, place the ...


6

Always push from the back (non-sharp) side of the knife to the front (sharp edge). So long as you only go in this direction, and move your hand away from the knife before pulling it back in, you shouldn't cut yourself. (at least, not from doing this). The same rules apply when washing you knife -- only wipe in that direction, or at a diagonal to it. ...


5

Well I think you answered this in your question. Face the cutting edge away from you. Sometimes however if I am pushing food off the cutting board into a bowl or skillet, I'll run the sides of the knife on the edge of the cutting board and knock-off what little gets stuck to the board with the knife again.


4

No, there is not a risk to getting the kind of cut you describe, as long as you treat your knife with the respect it deserves. If there's a dull, raised part at the back of the knife, it is called the bolster, otherwise it's the heel of the blade. The raised version is a common trait in forged knifes, and is supposed to add strength to the blade. ...


4

Depending on the type of honing rod and the technique you use for honing, you will remove more or less metal from the blade. You can confirm whether your rod removes metal by wiping the blade on a white tea cloth after honing. If you see a grey residue on the cloth then metal has been removed and you can decide yourself whether you want that in your food. ...


3

Let the butcher do it This is roughly the bone structure of a mammal tail: As you can see, it has very many small bones, with of course all the connective tissue. Unless you have solid knife skill, a very sharp boning knife (with the needle-like blade), a protective chain mail glove, and lots of patience, I would say something like this is better left ...


3

The knife in the picture is a paring knife. The way to use such a knife is completely different from what you pretend (cutting a carcass). A paring knife is used with the sharp end facing you and pushing the small food items across. For cutting a carcass, I'd recommend a regular chef's knife, a Chinese knife or, preferably, a cleaver.


2

Yes, you should clean after sharpening, which is not the same as honing. No, after honing, it's not necessary. By sharpening, you take some metal off the edge of the knife to create an edge. By honing, you realign the edge of the knife. See this answer for more details.


2

It depends on what I am actually doing with the knife. I would indeed not use a knife like this for work requiring some force. Slicing tomatoes is one thing, but image that you actually cut a chicken with that knife and in a forward motion with some force hit e.g. a bone. There is a definitive risk, that your finger will slip over the ridge and slide along ...


1

With some food that gets stuck it is possible to whack the knife hard on the cutting board with the edge down, making the food fall of the blade. Another solution is to try to minimize the need of wiping it in the first place. How to prevent sliced vegetables/roots from sticking to the blade


1

Hard chopping will not destroy the knife, but it will dull the knife faster. The edge of a knife is extremely narrow. As a result, regular use will push the edge to the left or right, leading to burrs. Hard impacts accelerate this process, and can even cause the edge of the blade to chip. Knife blades stay sharp longest when they are used gently and on soft ...


1

For the sake of a few seconds running the knife under the tap, or wiping it with a damp cloth, why would you not do this? Regardless of whether you remove large pieces of metal or just tiny particles - is it worth the risk of getting any of this in the food you prepare? I always give my knives a rinse and then dry them with a clean cloth.



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