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With some food that gets stuck it is possible to whack the knife hard on the cutting board with the edge down, making the food fall of the blade. Another solution is to try to minimize the need of wiping it in the first place. How to prevent sliced vegetables/roots from sticking to the blade


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I do both. I'm right-handed, so I hold the knife in my right hand and brush the left side (the side near me) with the edge pointing at me, and the right side (the side away from me) with the edge pointing away. For the near side, I move the pad of my finger along the spine of the blade, moving from the handle to the tip. This means the edge of the blade ...


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Well I think you answered this in your question. Face the cutting edge away from you. Sometimes however if I am pushing food off the cutting board into a bowl or skillet, I'll run the sides of the knife on the edge of the cutting board and knock-off what little gets stuck to the board with the knife again.


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Always push from the back (non-sharp) side of the knife to the front (sharp edge). So long as you only go in this direction, and move your hand away from the knife before pulling it back in, you shouldn't cut yourself. (at least, not from doing this). The same rules apply when washing you knife -- only wipe in that direction, or at a diagonal to it. ...


21

even the greatest knife masters will forget every once in a while to clean with the edge in the opposite direction No, they won't, not after cutting themselves a couple of times. It's natural to cut yourself while cutting food, occasionally, but I have never cut myself while slipping food from the blade. Always keep the edge away from you, place the ...


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Yes, very good answer GdD. May I add an elaboration? See it this way: think in subsets of tasks. Say you want to chop lots of onions. Now, you could take an onion, peel it, half it, dice it, put in a bowl. That is the "housecook" method. Not efficien, because you are putting down and picking up knives, throwing away peels etc. Do each subtask before the ...


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Although this is partially personal preference, in general you should have the uncut ingredients on the side of your non-cutting hand. This will set up a logical flow of material which keeps you from having to reach over your cutting hand. If you chop with your right then you'd have the uncut ingredients on your left, as after knife work your chopped ...


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Probably not, if it's onions Onions are a soft product so the damage from chopping this (weird) way is much more affected by what kind of cutting surface he's using rather than the product itself. This is because the greatest impact pressure on the knife will be the point where it hits the hard surface of the board. If you're worried about knife damage, ...


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It depends on how often you want to hone, what steel and edge geometry your knife uses, and how you use it. Generally, for the vast majority of kitchen knives -- even Kramer knives -- the following apply: The knife is made of stainless or light carbon steel, to hardness of below 62HRC The knife is double beveled although not necessarily symmetrically The ...



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