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15

At a microscopic level metal is malleable, and so the edge tends to bend rather than spall or break off. Still, it is probably technically true to a certain extent, and based on many many years of metal knife usage by millions or billions of people through history, completely irrelevant. Whatever effect it may have is vanishingly small.


11

Microscopic metal particles won't hurt you. The iron in fortified breakfast cereal is just food-grade iron particles. You can collect them with a magnet.


6

Sure, microscopic bits of metal go into your food when you use knives. It's just a bit more iron in your diet. When you consider that the average person eats 100mg of dirt per day the nanograms of metal you eat per year is pretty insignificant.


5

You will not be able to sharpen it with a steel as per Ching Chong's answer. You will be able to sharpen it with a couple of sharpening stones. If the blade is totally blunt you will need a reasonably coarse one to bring the edge back, and a finer one to refine the edge. Then you can strop it on the steel or the back of a leather belt to remove the burr. ...


5

Heat treatment changes the allotropy of an iron alloy. Steel doesn't equal steel; first, there are chemical differences (different amounts of carbon, nickel, etc. added) and second, there is a difference in the microcrystalline structure of the metal. The different allotropes (= same material in different structures) of steel have different mechanical ...


4

We have been selling left handed products now for 50 years this year - supplying the vast majority of specialist left handed stores around the world. I can confirm that Left handers do indeed need knives that are sharpened / scalloped / serrated on the opposite side to a right handed blade. So, holding the knife in your left hand - pointing it away from ...


4

How often you sharpen depends on how often you use them and the type of steel. I use Globals and Mundials and the Globals require much less sharpening Mundials. Here's a video from Chefs Armoury https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TPDgdo7jfM 1. Prep your stones Depending on what stones you use, you may need to soak or not. I use the Naniwa stones that just ...


4

This is a pretty intricate question and my answer is based on what I have read and personal experience. If I understand correctly, knives with dimples or scallops are supposed to create more air space between the knife and the food, thus reducing adhesion and making release of the food easier. This seems to be the reason most stated for an advantage of this ...


4

I'd just cut it at home that morning and bring it. If that didn't work out, I'd bring a pocketknife. I'm sure you can kludge things, but really, ripe tomatoes are one of the worst things to try to cut with a dull knife. It's so easy to make a mess of them, juice everywhere. And even if your tomatoes aren't that ripe, this still seems easier. (And if I ...


3

Do you mean by "sharpening steel" a honing steel? source: Wikipedia Commons; by Donovan Govan. A honing steel is not intended to sharpen a dull knife but only to straigten a skewed blade [1]. (Exception: a diamond honing "steel" but I think it it still not intended to be the only tool to sharpen a completely blunt knife, [2]) If you want so sharpen you ...


3

Given that the question is "how often", I want to actually answer that question, even though some of the answers above supply more complete advice. Stainless steel knives normally want honing with a steel every 2-4 uses. This will keep them sharp. Carbon steel knives should be honed after each use. If you have been honing, you should need to sharpen ...


3

I suspect that the knife owner shut up because he didn't know what he was talking about. So long as you don't mistreat them, Shun hold a blade rather well. The problem is that they're cut at a sharper angle than most European knives (16° vs. ~20°), so the blade is more delicate, and so is more prone to go out of alignment, especially if you use too hard of ...


3

For a home cook: Honing should be done before or after heavy use or once every couple of weeks, depending on how finicky you are about the blade itself. Proper honing can stave off the need for an actual grind/sharpen for years. -Honing realigns the existing edge. Just a few strops on each side of the sharpening steel. It doesn't take much. -Sharpening ...


3

If you lightly (and safely) draw your thumb from the side of the blade down towards and over the side of the knife edge, do you feel a burr? (Do this on each side, at the tip, edge and heel - do NOT drag your finger towards or parallel to the edge, drag down the side, across and away). The "burr" is caused by the very fine edge of the blade bending. If ...


2

Your link has directions for use: "To properly hone the knife, hold it at a 20-degree angle and draw the blade across the steel. Never stroke the same side of blade more than once in succession." In general, ceramic rods are more forgiving than the grooved steel ones -- which, in my opinion, should be avoided on good knives. (But that's another ...


2

The user "virtuovice" has some great videos on knife sharpening. It was my introduction to whetstone sharpening and since following his videos, I have been able to sharpen my range of kitchen knives to a pretty incredible sharpness. His videos are mainly aimed at hunting knives, but the techniques can be applied to kitchen knives Have a look at this video: ...


2

Utility knives are tweeners, not good for paring and far less useful than a 6-8" chef's knife for cutting vegetables and meats. After looking at mine for years, and using it only rarely, I converted it to a letter opener, a task at which it excels.


2

So, as I couldn't find anything online regarding this. I asked the butcher I work with. He also can't give a definite answer, he does however have a collection, including a cleaver similar to the Curved Front. He recons as the front rarely takes a pounding like the main flat section, it's almost always sharper. As a result if for example he is cleaning the ...


1

I'm seriously questioning suggestions to use common non-foodie objects like office scissors, business cards, keys(!), rulers and fingernails to cut tomatoes. Can you imagine the amount of dirt on those things? If your office does not have a knife, does it have the required facilities to properly clean the above tools to use them for cutting food? Don't get ...


1

Gossamer thread works great if you have any handy. Baring that almost any kind of thread will do the job with the right back and forth motion. The tricky part is you usually need three hands for this method. More likely to be present at most workplaces is paper. Card stock is best, but any weight paper will do if you pull it tight (much like the thread ...


1

Every 6-12 months is a usually quoted figure for mean-time-between professional sharpenings, this varies greatly depending on usage, and as others have pointed-out, what your cutting-board is made of. (Glass or stone is a No-No.) It sounds like you're a little ahead of the curve, but I wouldn't worry about too much. To find a knife-shop, I'd recommend ...


1

I use boning and fillet knives most often when preparing meat, and a slicer knife when portioning it after cooking - heck, I use my kitchen shears more often than my chef's knife when prepping raw meats (especially poultry and fish). The chef's knife is used to prepare veggies, which is where the bulk of any cuisine's prep is, vegetarian or not. It's ...


1

Japanese swords were made by layering the steel then forge welding it (heating and beating with a hammer). When the billet gets stretched, it is folded again, heated and beat, over and over. Good quality katanas will have 1,000 or more layers. They also created/invented the forge wekding of hard and soft metals,. as mentioned, in order to have a sword ...


1

I use it to cut my home made after dinner mint chocolate slab into bite size squares. It sits better in hot water and gives a nice, sharp clean cut to the chocolate...mmmm...yum


1

Your very first set of knives should be steel knife. The reason is quite simple, whatever a ceramic knife can cut, a steel knife can cut. If I were you as you are moving for the first time, budget is probably your primary priority, I would buy a cheap set of knives with the promise of buying a real one when I have the budget for it later on in my life. Now, ...


1

I applaud you for going over the "dark side" of knives. I find many people are afraid of using the Chinese cleaver due to it's size, weight and shape. But if you just look at most Chinese trained cooks/chefs, they basically use this one knife to do most of their cutting/slicing/dicing/mincing/smashing and food transferring. It is really something to watch ...



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