Hot answers tagged

4

Any knife that has a symetrical blade profile should be ambidexterous in use. Santoku and chef knives typically come with a symmetrical profile1, so you should be able to get a decent choice, whichever of the types you finally choose. Whether you chose a V-shaped or double-bevel, a hollow cut or a convex blade is ultimately up to you, your intended uses and ...


4

Very blunt knives need to be reworked by stone or sandpaper The edge on a very blunt blade will have folded over itself and lost a lot of its proper crystal structure. It's also likely to have lost a lot of its bevel geometry too, so the edge won't be "straight" longitudinally. Your best bet would be to invest, just one time, in sending it in for ...


4

Lots of opinins but not much metallurgical knowledge.....reminds me of hotroders thinking something is better if its made out of billet instead 6061 AL (same thing). Where's that crazy smilie? Carbon steel is actually a misnomer, in many industries carbond steel is refered to a mild steel alloy that isn't stailness. What our knives are made of is a medium ...


4

A more modern set... Disclosure: I'm on the board of directors for a high end knife company. The traditional advice given to young home cooks has been to get something like: 8" chef's knife 4" paring knife Bread knife (performs a common task that the other knives cannot). However, knife materials and home cooking skills have improved quite a bit over ...


4

Many home cooks use utility knives more often than paring knives Reasons: Home cooking often involves "one off" tasks like cutting fruit, tomatoes, onions, etc Utility knives can be made very sharp because the shorter blade allows for much thinner steel, which reduces friction on food while, promotes better cutting precision, and helps support greater ...


2

A utility knife does what a chef's knife does, but not as well, and is intended to paired with a different chef's knife than what 99% of home cooks use. It may sound redundant, but I think of it this way: a utility knife is cheaper, usually smaller, lighter, easier to use/sharpen/clean, and less intimidating for someone who isn't in the kitchen much. Chef's ...


2

Previously I answered that a legitimate use for a utility knife might be when you can only afford one knife. In the same post I undermine my own answer showing how I found no historical evidence for this. I wonder if I wasn't more interested in venting frustration at having a poor knife than providing a good answer. Leaving aside my dubious attempt at an ...


2

I have for years used sandpaper for sharpening and polishing my plane blades and bench chisels in my woodworking shop. It works wonderfully well provided every stroke on the abrasive is exactly the same angle. Remember that the cutting edge is the union of two planes. The more uniform the planes, the sharper the edge. I finish off with 6000 grit wet paper, ...


2

You actually can sharpen a ceramic knife with a diamond wheel sharpener. There's 2 sharpeners that can sharpen ceramic knives. Kyocera has a battery powered one (DS50) http://www.amazon.com/Kyocerca-DS-50-Electric-Diamond-Sharpener/dp/B002R90N7W But based on the reviews it's designed mainly for Kyocera knives, and it's battery powered so it doesn't ...


2

As I am sure you can tell by looking at it, your Japanese knife is primarily sharpened only on one side. As a result, the cutting edge is angled more steeply. Japaneseknives on Wordpress has some simple pictures illustrating this. This asymmetry is why you can't reliably use a honing rod on it, which relies on swipes to both sides of the edge to keep the ...


2

What stones you get depend on the current condition of the knife and how regularly you plan on sharpening it. If you are bringing the edge back on a dull knife, you will need to start with a relatively coarse stone (say, 240 - 600) to start the edge off. If the knife is still in pretty good condition, you can use something like a 1200 once a week to maintain ...


2

Yes, there is a difference The ridges on a honing rod provide greater curvature at the point of contact between the rod and the blade. This has the effect of increasing the contact pressure (force is concentrated over a smaller arc). Some reasons you might want to increase contact pressure: You're sharpening a very hard knife (e.g. carbon steel) You're ...


1

You will need a standard curved 10" butcher knife. You cannot cut a proper steak with a straight-bladed chef's knife, as the blade will not contact the cutting board at the proper angle. The knife needs to be sharp. A sharp knife is less likely to cut you than a dull one because the handler will not have to fight with it. Also, please observe all safety ...


1

I found this on chefknivestogo and I think it explains it quite well. RAY <> A "50/50" usually references an edge. So on the cutting edge, it is an even 50/50 "V". It can be 50/50 at 12 degrees or 50/50 @20, but each sides angle is equivocal. A double bevel is a knife design created by grinding. So from the spine to the cutting edge, there is a ...


1

Hone frequently, sharpen periodically A proper, sharp knife will have a well structured, rigid, and sharp blade bevel (i.e. the very edge of the blade, less than a hair's length across, where the steel comes to a point). No matter how hard the steel is, the bevel will wear with cutting so it needs to be maintained. Hone yourself Honing is the process of ...


1

It depends on a few different factors There is no single optimal hardness for a chef's knife. It depends on: The geometry of the blade The alloy used (two different alloys at the same hardness will have different vulnerability to chipping, edge retention, etc) The mix of cutting styles (slice, push, chop) ...and more Generally high performance chef's ...


1

It depends, but here's how you can tell... It's good practice to hone knives often (I recommend once a day or before you use the knife for a session). Honing helps center the edge of the knife, prevent edge folding and nicking, and provides structural support for the edge. Despite regular honing, a knife blade will eventually wear through a variety of ...


1

It depends on what you're cutting It also depends on how deep the channel is. The purpose of the channels is to reduce the surface area of the knife that comes into contact with the food you're cutting. The lower that surface area, the lower the friction for cutting. There are a number of ways to reduce surface area: Use channels Use a shorter blade ...


1

I would suggest getting a single, long sujihiki style knife with the following features: High-carbon stainless or carbon steel - This will help maintain a sharp edge with good retention. Carbon steel needs to be kept very dry to avoid rusting, so it's a little harder to maintain. Comfortable grip - Cutting sushi involves long, repeated and consistent ...


1

VG-10 is a very versatile steel, which is exactly why it's popular with high-end chef's knives and gyutos. You should be able to use the gyuto with most cutting techniques except: Hard chopping - hard steel (even VG-10) is more prone to chipping, and gyutos are not really designed to support this movement Cutting very hard products - Cutting a pit stone, ...


1

I'm not a metallurgist, but when I received my knife sharpening training, it was explained to me that the steel was used to align the microscopic raggedy edge of the knife after sharpening into a "foil", like a fine fin along the tip of the edge of the knife. Depending on what I'm cutting, the fin works like a scalpel. If I'm making fine cuts to meat, I ...


1

You're over thinking this. Just toss it in the bin. There are plenty of other dangerous sharp things in bins already. Eg, broken glass, tin cans/lids, etc. Anyone going through bins (eg Freegans, garbage disposal workers, super spy's jumping out of buildings) knows to take precautions (or will learn quickly). Odds are that no one will go through your bin on ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible