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14

At a microscopic level metal is malleable, and so the edge tends to bend rather than spall or break off. Still, it is probably technically true to a certain extent, and based on many many years of metal knife usage by millions or billions of people through history, completely irrelevant. Whatever effect it may have is vanishingly small.


12

I am assuming by "fluted knife", you mean what is sometimes called a granton or hollow edge knife, where there are indentations in the blade intended to reduce sticking or adhesion to the food: Except in very specific circumstances, this feature makes very little difference, those circumstances being: Carving large roasts Cutting large and tough ...


9

A stone is the hardest way to sharpen a knife. If you don't get the angle exactly right, you'll just be messing up your knife, not sharpening it. If you do want to go that way, yes, you'd definitely want to practice on something cheaper, because it's likely you will mess it up. This is why a lot of people just take their expensive knives to a professional to ...


8

I believe that there are two major options: Wood cutting boards Plastic cutting boards Either of these will provide a perfectly appropriate surface for you to use your knives against. From a food safety point of view, both can be excellent, although they have different pros and cons. There is some evidence that wood cutting boards actually inhibit ...


8

The traditional knife for sushi and sashimi is the yanagi sashimi. It features a long blade (approx 10in or 270mm) that has a chisel ground blade which is often hollow ground on the back, called urasaki. The long blade allows you to cut thin slices in one continuous motion so that you don't you don't have slashes marks from changing direction. There are ...


7

Even for meat eaters, almost all knife work is done on vegetables. Santukos and chef's knives are general purpose knives, with great utility on vegetables. Chinese cleavers are also general purpose knives, the functional equivalent in that culture to the chef's knife. The advice offered to you in this question: Which knife is best for somone just ...


6

The difference between a santuko and European chef's knife is mostly a matter of personal taste and style. However, if you live in North America, Europe, or anywhere else with a European cooking tradition, most of the resources and videos that you see to help you develop knife skills will assume you have a chef's knife. For this reason, I suggest you start ...


4

Knives are very hard-worked tools in the kitchen, and need to be easy to clean and maintain. At all quality levels, unless resin impregnated or otherwise treated, wood does not stand up well to harsh treatment, such as frequent trips through the dishwasher. Even if washed by hand, you want to wash it and then dry it, so the water doesn't soak in and lead ...


4

I understand that the ridges just make the honing process faster You can hone a knife with more or less anything. Preferably with material of a similar nature so as not to "grab" the knife edge and pull chunks off it For a quick test, take a knife that needs honing, and use the back square edge of another knife to hone it with The square edge bites into ...


4

The ultimate answer here is to try them both (cook dinner for a friend who has them both?) and go with the one that is more comfortable for you. For example, my fiancee prefers a large chef knife, I prefer the santoku. Both of us can cut just as fast, it really just comes down to personal preference and that special "how it feels in your hand" feeling. ...


3

It really is an issue of personal preference. If you prefer a rocking motion, the German profile suits your style better; if you are a push-and-slide person, the French profile is more suitable for you. It also possible to find models at various points within the range. See this Chef Talk thread for an in depth discussion (with diagrams at one point). The ...


3

If you sharpen it with a 20 degree edge, it will remove material until it matches the 20 degree bevel. It is up to you whether you like this better or not; however, if you selected this particular knife because you like the way it feels and cuts, the 15 degree bevel may be a contributor to that. Will it harm the knife? No, but it will change its ...


3

Yes, you should hone your paring knives. The technique is much the same, except that paring knives are smaller. Since physical skills are hard to describe in text, and you have already had in-person coaching, won't try to describe the technique; just use the one that you are most comfortable with. Note that some santukus may have a different bevel angle ...


3

Don't take anything that costs much: You may have it taken away from you by border controls. In some parts of the world being able to confiscate nice things is a perk of the job. You want to enter (or leave) the country, you part with the knife. It could also be illegal to bring in knives over a certain size Hostels are famous for being rife with theft. ...


3

I typically use white nylon cutting boards for all my food prep. They're cheap, you can buy 'em big or small, they won't roll a knife edge, and they work for everything from fruits and vegetables to salad greens to sushi to chicken. When you're done with all that, throw it in the dishwasher with a hot water rinse and it's good to go for the next meal. I ...


2

You will also want to consider what experience they have with different grinds of knives - Hollow vs. regular, for example, and their familiarity with edges. At the very least, sharpeners should be able to distinguish hollow from v-grind and convex edge. You may want to ask if they're familiar with single- and compound- or double-bevel sharpening. Ask what ...


2

If you made the investment as I did for a professional diamond wheel electric knife sharpener as you saw the chef point out in the video above, I can tell you that this will indeed sharpen ceramic knives. I was reluctant to try this and possibly damage the sharpener, but I was otherwise going to toss out this "starter" ceramic cooks knife. I was also ...


2

As a custom knife builder my answer is simple: Yes and no. Some damascus blades are cheaply made and consist of simple layered steel or flattened steel cable that is etched to produce the lines that many people find attractive. They are definitely not worth any extra cost and in fact are easily outperformed by regular modern kitchen knives of moderate to ...


2

Wipe your blade along the flats with a clean, damp towel (or sponge) - set upon the counter or cutting board - frequently when cutting acidic items like onions, tomatoes or fruit. Japanese sushi chefs will have a wet kitchen towel folded into a neat pad on a lower corner of their cutting board for this purpose. When you are done with one cutting chore and ...


2

Keep in mind that a knife steel or a honing steel does not actually sharpen the knife, it merely re-aligns the microscopic sawtooths/burrs created on the edge of the knife from cutting to reduce the drag. The contact point of a ridged-steel is less blunt (smaller radius on the ridge vs the steel) and might deliver more concentrated force. with a ridged ...


2

Bob Kramer has an excellent series of youtube videos about honing and sharpening your knives: What is Sharp? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRPrswhMdAc Honing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUdrRE7W0b4 Stoning: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUbkPdkUDuo Keys are using the correct angle (he uses a matchbook to set the angle), using enough pressure (5 ...


2

There are some very good utility knives out there. I think my ones are mostly made by Victorinox, but the brand isn't critical. Each knife costs the equivalent of about $5 US, and lasts in good sharp condition for about 2 years. These are the knives I use all the time, as I'm usually too lazy to bring out (and then clean) my proper "katana" knife. ...


1

I can't say that I'm in that age range, but the issues might not be the knives themselves, but training them to properly use them. A large, heavy knife might do more of the work for you, but not if you're bringing the knife down for chopping ... you have to know how to slice through the item, which may require a larger cutting board (which itself is more ...


1

The angle of the edge should adjust itself when sharpening anyway. Most professional chefs will probably use a sharpening steel or stone and will just sharpen their knives in a way that feels natural. It helps to understand the way a knife edge becomes dull. If you were to zoom in on a knife edge you would see what look like hundreds and thousands of ...


1

Depends how serious you're trying to be about cooking, and how you're traveling. If you don't want to deal with packing a large, sharp knife, you're pretty much stuck with a paring knife and slightly limited cooking. But if you want to be able to do anything you like, just find a cheap knife (or knife set) in the size/style you want. For example, I bought ...


1

Opinel folding knife: http://www.opinel-usa.com/proddetail.asp?prod=Opinel-No-8-carbon-steel-folding-knife Cheap, good quality, and it folds so you won't slice yourself while rooting around in your suitcase.


1

Wood has natural antibacterial properties where as plastic and resin provide a hospitable environment for bacterial growth. For that reason, you might want to consider using wood handled knives and cutting boards. One thing you shouldn't do with wood and resign handled knives, even with Wusthofs is put them in the dishwasher. The high heat and steam and ...


1

For new chefs, Tim Ferriss suggests a 6" meat cleaver in the book: 4-hour chef. It sounds odd at first. However, chopping, cutting, and developing knife skills with a sharp clever makes good sense. The blade is taller and slightly heavier to make it more forgiving to crude muscle movements. This would be different than a butcher's cleaver and you're not ...


1

The Victorinox Fibrox 8-inch Chef's knife has been getting good reviews for years. It is sturdy, holds an edge well, and is inexpensive. It's a hybrid of a thin Japanese blade with a 15-degree edge (western knives have a 20-degree edge), but with the longer, broader blade of European knives. And at $30 it's a great choice for a first knife to start honing ...


1

A good blade is a pleasure in your hand to use and look at. For the last 50 yrs or so I've used the same Trident (Wustof) knives. Feel. Cut. Balance. Can't be beaten. But recently I bough a Torijo Damascus Utility. Straight from Japan delivered for $68. Balance feel etc. Lighter but good in the hand. And the LOOK of the blade. YEP.. They worth the extra. ...



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