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15

At a microscopic level metal is malleable, and so the edge tends to bend rather than spall or break off. Still, it is probably technically true to a certain extent, and based on many many years of metal knife usage by millions or billions of people through history, completely irrelevant. Whatever effect it may have is vanishingly small.


11

Microscopic metal particles won't hurt you. The iron in fortified breakfast cereal is just food-grade iron particles. You can collect them with a magnet.


6

Sure, microscopic bits of metal go into your food when you use knives. It's just a bit more iron in your diet. When you consider that the average person eats 100mg of dirt per day the nanograms of metal you eat per year is pretty insignificant.


4

Don't take anything that costs much: You may have it taken away from you by border controls. In some parts of the world being able to confiscate nice things is a perk of the job. You want to enter (or leave) the country, you part with the knife. It could also be illegal to bring in knives over a certain size Hostels are famous for being rife with theft. ...


3

If you sharpen it with a 20 degree edge, it will remove material until it matches the 20 degree bevel. It is up to you whether you like this better or not; however, if you selected this particular knife because you like the way it feels and cuts, the 15 degree bevel may be a contributor to that. Will it harm the knife? No, but it will change its ...


3

Yes, you should hone your paring knives. The technique is much the same, except that paring knives are smaller. Since physical skills are hard to describe in text, and you have already had in-person coaching, won't try to describe the technique; just use the one that you are most comfortable with. Note that some santukus may have a different bevel angle ...


3

It really is an issue of personal preference. If you prefer a rocking motion, the German profile suits your style better; if you are a push-and-slide person, the French profile is more suitable for you. It also possible to find models at various points within the range. See this Chef Talk thread for an in depth discussion (with diagrams at one point). The ...


3

I would take an inexpensive paring knife. For traveling I would want something small and lightweight, and cheap enough that I don't care if I manage to lose it or break it. It should be fine for working with small fruits, vegetables and meats.


2

Wipe your blade along the flats with a clean, damp towel (or sponge) - set upon the counter or cutting board - frequently when cutting acidic items like onions, tomatoes or fruit. Japanese sushi chefs will have a wet kitchen towel folded into a neat pad on a lower corner of their cutting board for this purpose. When you are done with one cutting chore and ...


2

There are some very good utility knives out there. I think my ones are mostly made by Victorinox, but the brand isn't critical. Each knife costs the equivalent of about $5 US, and lasts in good sharp condition for about 2 years. These are the knives I use all the time, as I'm usually too lazy to bring out (and then clean) my proper "katana" knife. ...


1

I don't have a Wustof Ikon that I can compare, but: Wustof Grad Prix II : 250g Shun Classic : 222g


1

How often you sharpen depends on how often you use them and the type of steel. I use Globals and Mundials and the Globals require much less sharpening Mundials. Here's a video from Chefs Armoury https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TPDgdo7jfM 1. Prep your stones Depending on what stones you use, you may need to soak or not. I use the Naniwa stones that just ...


1

The user "virtuovice" has some great videos on knife sharpening. It was my introduction to whetstone sharpening and since following his videos, I have been able to sharpen my range of kitchen knives to a pretty incredible sharpness. His videos are mainly aimed at hunting knives, but the techniques can be applied to kitchen knives Have a look at this video: ...


1

I can't say that I'm in that age range, but the issues might not be the knives themselves, but training them to properly use them. A large, heavy knife might do more of the work for you, but not if you're bringing the knife down for chopping ... you have to know how to slice through the item, which may require a larger cutting board (which itself is more ...


1

The angle of the edge should adjust itself when sharpening anyway. Most professional chefs will probably use a sharpening steel or stone and will just sharpen their knives in a way that feels natural. It helps to understand the way a knife edge becomes dull. If you were to zoom in on a knife edge you would see what look like hundreds and thousands of ...


1

Depends how serious you're trying to be about cooking, and how you're traveling. If you don't want to deal with packing a large, sharp knife, you're pretty much stuck with a paring knife and slightly limited cooking. But if you want to be able to do anything you like, just find a cheap knife (or knife set) in the size/style you want. For example, I bought ...


1

Opinel folding knife: http://www.opinel-usa.com/proddetail.asp?prod=Opinel-No-8-carbon-steel-folding-knife Cheap, good quality, and it folds so you won't slice yourself while rooting around in your suitcase.


1

I use boning and fillet knives most often when preparing meat, and a slicer knife when portioning it after cooking - heck, I use my kitchen shears more often than my chef's knife when prepping raw meats (especially poultry and fish). The chef's knife is used to prepare veggies, which is where the bulk of any cuisine's prep is, vegetarian or not. It's ...


1

Chinese chef's knife is a multipurpose tool, and (depending on weight and blade thickness) is very handy to slice, chop and dice vegetables. The technique is to let the knife's weight to the work, i.e. cook exerts no or almost no force on the downstroke. Moreover it also used to transfer sliced and chopped ingredients to a wok pan. Have a look at videos ...


1

A good blade is a pleasure in your hand to use and look at. For the last 50 yrs or so I've used the same Trident (Wustof) knives. Feel. Cut. Balance. Can't be beaten. But recently I bough a Torijo Damascus Utility. Straight from Japan delivered for $68. Balance feel etc. Lighter but good in the hand. And the LOOK of the blade. YEP.. They worth the extra. ...


1

I use it to cut my home made after dinner mint chocolate slab into bite size squares. It sits better in hot water and gives a nice, sharp clean cut to the chocolate...mmmm...yum


1

It really depends on both your budget and your personal taste. I personally use both. I bought several ceramic knives in different sizes years ago. Due to the low price (5-10 bucks depending on knive size), I even bought spares, none of which I have yet to use. They're still very sharp and I use them most of the time for both meat, veggies and especially ...


1

I applaud you for going over the "dark side" of knives. I find many people are afraid of using the Chinese cleaver due to it's size, weight and shape. But if you just look at most Chinese trained cooks/chefs, they basically use this one knife to do most of their cutting/slicing/dicing/mincing/smashing and food transferring. It is really something to watch ...


1

One thing not yet mentioned: For an everyday plastic board, it's great to have one just small enough to easily fit in the dishwasher - easily and perfectly sanitized every time.



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