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Most santoku, and certainly nakiri/usuba, knives are not good at supporting cutting styles that rely on the tip rolling smoothly on the cutting board; santoku tips tend to offer a more limited angle before the tip catches into the cutting board instead of rolling - while this seems to support the knife very firmly, it can very abruptly stop doing so, ending ...


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It depends on how often you want to hone, what steel and edge geometry your knife uses, and how you use it. Generally, for the vast majority of kitchen knives -- even Kramer knives -- the following apply: The knife is made of stainless or light carbon steel, to hardness of below 62HRC The knife is double beveled although not necessarily symmetrically The ...



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