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8

(Storage note: do not wash the bulbs before storing them; place in plastic bag in the refrigerator. Wash just before using.) Young kohlrabi is great raw. Peel first, then add to salads (sliced or grated) serve as part of a veggie platter w/ dip grate it and add to slaw (but after grating it, put some salt on it & let it sit, then squeeze the water ...


5

I used to eat them like apples when I was a child, I still like the raw kohlrabi in salads. Basically, it's a sweet'ish/spicy turnip/cabbage/raddish so you can do with it, more or less anything you can do with those three vegetables. As I said. it's great in salads, it can be steamed or added to stews, deep fried etc. The leaves are also excellent in ...


5

I found one recipe that called for it to be cubed, salt to taste, and drizzled with olive oil and baked until tender. That's the only way I've prepared it and I thought it was great. Go to the recipes section of Doe Run Farm (the CSA we get our veggie box from), and you'll find the Kohl Rabi recipe.


3

Most people don't realize that Kohlrabi and Broccoli are in fact different cultivars of the same species of plant (along with cabbage, cauliflower, kale and a bunch of other plants). So it's not just like a broccoli stem - it is a broccoli stem :) I have two favorite uses for Kohlrabi - sliced thinly and used in asian-style wok dishes in a creme soup - just ...


2

We sliced it into about 1 inch square pieces (like a french fry but bigger) and then just lightly browned them in a bit of olive oil over high heat.


2

You can peel it and slice it, add some lemon and salt and eat it raw as a fresh salad. It goes very well with fresh green apple, lettuce and a cold potato salad. It's highly recommended to eat fresh and not cooked. You need to make sure you peel it properly first though.


1

Kohlrabi is essentially like a giant broccoli stem. If you steam it or boil it, the texture will be like the "tree trunk" part of a broccoli stalk. You can use a potato peeler to get thin ribbons and steam those. That should be flexible enough to use as a non-gluten pasta substitute. It is also good shredded with a tart apple and some carrot and tossed ...


1

I spoke with the farm that sold me the kohlrabi; they have seen people make something akin to mashed rutabaga by boiling kohlrabi for ages and ages, so it gets about that soft. Note that mashed rutabaga is apparently still firmer than mashed potatoes, but obviously soft enough to mash into a pulp. For a stir-fry, they suggested a match-stick shape rather ...


1

It's a lot like a broccoli stem or a cauliflower. Steam, Saute, or Braise.



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