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14

A great resource for how long foods can be kept is Stilltasty.com. According to them, commercially bottled pickles (and kimchee would fall into this category) can be kept after opening for one year in the refrigerator.


9

To answer your specific scenario, kimchi has myriad variations using any number of vegetables, from perilla leaves to Korean radishes to napa cabbage. There are forms of kimchi that involve no chilies (white kimchi), some involve a lot of water and bear little resemblance to the typical napa cabbage one (mul kimchi). The main constraints for Korean-ness of ...


8

Just keep it dry. I buy 100 sheets packs and store them in a zip-loc type bag in the cupboard for over a year


6

Most Koreans won't eat kimchi if a) the veggies have become significantly mushy b) the juices taste 'sparkly', it's hard to describe this flavor exactly, but when you taste it, you'll know what I mean. A year seems like a long time for opened kimchi to me, but I would just use my tastebuds to assess the above.


5

When I go to the Korean supermarkets in LA, I usually see half an aisle just dedicated to 고추가루 in all kinds of forms (mild to spicy, fine to coarse grind) and colors. I don't know that there's any specific pepper than it is all about how sweet and mildly spicy 고추가루 is supposed to be. You could start from there to make your own by sun drying and crushing ...


5

Kimchi is rotten cabbage. It's already bad :) Seriously though, if it isn't moldy, it's probably fine. If you have the kind in the jar that has a carbonated taste, and it's still carbonated, it's fine.


4

In every Korean kitchen I have encountered, everyone has been extremely particular in that clean utensils should be used when extracting the kimchee from the jar, being very careful not to contaminate the kimchee. I have been told on many occasions that contaminating the kimchee can shorten the shelf life of the kimchee and taint the flavor. My family will ...


4

Toasted sesame oil is usually the go-to for Korean cuisine. It is included as a seasoning in the last steps of the recipes you link. Sesame oil is typically used for seasoning, not cooking with. Some types of sesame oil may be appropriate for stir frys and such, but I don't think I've ever used toasted sesame oil (the very strong smelling, flavored one) for ...


3

There is a particular baked good called kastera in Korea, but they pretty much use the term as a generic name for any Western-style sweet cakes (source: my Korean mother-in-law). So the answer is yes and no. You will find a kastera equivalent to Japanese kasutera, but it is a subset of the kastera set. The closest comparison I can think of would be the term ...


3

Think soluble fiber. The following excerpt from WebMD explains very well the difference between soluble and insoluble fiber and lists foods where each can be found. Soluble vs. Insoluble Fiber Soluble fiber dissolves in water. Insoluble fiber does not. [...] Soluble fibers attract water and form a gel. [...]


3

I found ojingeo bokkeum (오징어볶음), which is squid stir-fried in a chilli sauce, to be pretty intense, especially as a jeongol (전골) or stew, where it's both hot (as in spicy) and hot (as in temperature). The sweetness of the stew does nothing to lessen the intensity of the dish. Also ridiculously spicy is buldak (불닭), which is again a stir-fry of chicken in a ...


2

I made Napa Cabbage Kimchi about 2 and a half months ago and had two containers in the back of the fridge. One was half full in a plastic honey container and a full one. I was worried that it had spoiled by this time but when I tried it, it was delicious. I am not Korean but I have enjoyed really sour kimchi for a long time. I'm so stoked that I have another ...


2

Mc Cormick now makes Korean Red Pepper Flakes for sale at some Costcos (also in smaller containes at the Supermarket). I bought a large container and I am going back for more. Great flavor and heat for just about everything.


2

A Korean friend I asked suggested "jeyuk deopbap" (제육덮밥 in Korean). In English it seems to be translated as "spicy fried pork". It will be served with rice. But you can also find "Jeyuk bokkeum" (제육볶음), which is just the spicy pork alone, no rice. He suggests to order it "very spicy". It might work better to try to say this in Korean but it's hard to ...


2

It's not so much the dry ingredients as it is the cooking technique, which involves double frying the chicken. You'll notice that the recipe you link instructs you to double fry the chicken, and so do others like this one: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2010/04/dinner-tonight-korean-fried-chicken-recipe.html


2

Was curious myself, so I did some more searching. I found a few sites that suggested honey as a alternative, but note that honey is sweeter, so you'll need to cut back. The majority of resources I found agree that corn syrup is your best and closest western substitute. Traditionally the Malt Syrup (or Mul Yut? Mulyeot?) was apparently made from barley, but ...


1

If they are completely dry, that's fine; you can buy hard dried tteok and they are shelf stable. But if they are moist, that seems very unsafe to have sitting out at room temperature for an indeterminate period of time.


1

"For the typical palate of most people from English-speaking countries, just about all Korean food is spicy." Uh, no its not. There are many Korean dishes that aren't spicy at all. As in, they have no spicy/heat creating element to them. The typical green Korean chili pepper (풋고추) is not hotter than a Jalapeno pepper on the Scoville scale, anyway. To ...


1

If you are unable to locate the real Korean pepper powder, I think you will have to make a blend of your own. Ancho chilis have a fairly similar flavor, but are not hot enough. So you would have to mix some amount of a hotter powder into ancho powder, and that could give you what you seek. Nothing is going to be perfect, but this can get you to a reasonable ...


1

It's really hard to find substitute because the way it is processed is different too. I'm not sure what the chilies are called but they are quite long and slender. The Korean ones are bright red and sweeter and the ones in western markets are pretty dark and bitter.


1

When I make kimchi, I usually leave it in a dark, cool corner of my utility room for 1-2 months before we start to eat it. We usually eat half the batch (1L) at once, then refrigerate. The second half is usually gone in a few weeks. Last night, however, we finished a batch that had been forgotten about and sat in the fridge for about 4 months. It tasted ...


1

"Bad" is a relative term for fermented pickles -- the whole point of the things is that they are a bit spoiled. It should get more sour/pricklier/funkier as time goes on and still be fine, but use your eyes and nose: if it gets stinky in some new and exciting way or looks strange, I'd avoid.



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