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25

As Kosher salt goes there is also a difference in the types. Many chefs (myself included) recommend and prefer Diamond Crystal brand Kosher salt. Diamond Crystal (owned by Cargill) uses a patented process of producing salt known as the Alberger Process. In in the interest of keeping the explanation simple, essentially it creates flat salt crystals with a ...


10

Kosher salt is the same thing (though I'm pretty sure it's not iodized), but the crystals are less dense and larger. There's more air in each piece, and they don't pack together as tightly. That means you have to put a larger volume of kosher to get the same amount of actual sodium chloride (salt). Think of it as the difference between ice cubes (regular ...


9

The reason people choose Kosher/Sea/Rock salt over table salt is mainly down to the crystal size and the lack of additives like iodine. Kosher salt is less soluble and less dense than table salt. The large crystals in these salts mean that unless there is a fair bit of water present they don't completely dissolve. This means it is less likely you'll over ...


7

Kosher salt is processed differently and has no iodine in it, so some people like the flavor better. It's not going to make that much difference, any salt will do. Just don't oversalt it, you want to taste the meat, not the salt.


7

Kosher salt is pure, like table salt, but without any iodine and (usually) without any anti-caking agents. Kosher salt crystals are also coarse, but flat, which makes them easy to dissolve or season/coat meat. Unprocessed sea salt is simply coarse; the shape of the crystals (whole or ground) does not stick to meat particularly well and the impurities make ...


6

Additionally, regular salt contains iodine (added to most table salts since the 1920's) while Kosher salt does not have any added ingredients mixed into it....


5

There are no differences health-wise. They are both the same compound, in essentially the same form. The only difference is the shape of the crystals. Chefs prefer it because it is easy to grip with fingers. Table salt is too fine, and runs between your fingers, making it difficult to get a consistent amount when adding a pinch. The flat crystals work ...


5

You could try Maldon Sea Salt, or similar supermarket sea salts. While not identical to kosher salt, they can be used in a similar way. Maldon is also is much cheaper in the UK than it is in the US (where it's an import). It's not a product I can recall seeing in many UK stores.


4

Kosher salt and table salt are equally "salty", however, kosher salt is less compact, which means that the same volume of salt will not be equally salty.


4

Potato chips have to be fried in lots of oil. If you are using little, you are doing it wrong and your chips are less tasty than they could be. As Preston Fitzgerald mentioned in a comment, salt doesn't dissolve in oil. It could be that it will fall to the bottom. Alternatively, the convection in the hot oil could move it around. But still, the salt will ...


4

You can use Kosher salt or sea salt or even table salt but keep in mind that they are interchangeable by weight NOT volume. Volumetric measurements fail because of different sizes and shapes of salt crystals. Kosher salt crystals are, as you pointed out, larger and end up with larger gaps between the crystals when measured by volume than the smaller table ...


4

You don't describe the recipe, so it's hard to say why the author insisted on Kosher salt. If you're supposed to rub the salt on the steak to remove surface blood, then kosher salt is more effective than table salt. If the salt is just a seasoning, Kosher salt (which has bigger granules than table salt) will add a grittiness that some people enjoy. Either ...


3

The difference in salt is more related to how the salt is being used. So for the purpose of quickly salting before cooking or at the table any type of salt will do. However if you are salting your meat at least an hour in advance and letting it rest before cooking (which I HIGHLY recommend you do) then using the larger grains of Kosher salt has a positive ...


3

"Kosher" salt has nothing to do with parve rules except maybe in the application of "koshering" AKA dry-brining (as a devout atheist, I haven't a clue on that one). It is coarser than regular table salt (making measurements slightly different) and it contains no added iodine. Certain food snobs (ehem) tend to find it somewhat superior in taste. In general, ...


2

Another way to achieve what you're looking for... My mother in law will cut her beans and add salt to them. Because the beans have been washed in water, there's enough water to dissolve the salt. She'll then deep fry the beans for a specific dish, and when the beans are done frying, they're salty enough. She does this with eggplant and bitter gourd as well, ...


2

The answer on this page might help: Anyhow just call up the butcher or a kosher grocer and ask where you get "kashering salt", not "kosher salt", it's the same thing used to make meat kosher after ritual slaughtering as it draws out the blood. Its totally pure. It also draws out the gunk from our noses which is why it's so good. And you can certainly ...


2

Kosher salt is fine. The salt crystals should dissolve without a problem. You should season at the beginning and end of cooking - add salt with, say, the onions and spices, then season to your taste at the end, after any reduction of gravy.


1

PepsiCo (owner of Lays chips) developed a new custom salt for potato chips, which allows them to use far less salt to achieve the same level of saltiness. This will allow them to cut sodium levels by 25%. So it's certainly true that the form of the salt has an affect on the amount of sodium you are consuming compared to the saltiness of the food. Some of ...


1

Kosher salt (or koshering salt) is a more American-known name for what we in Britain call flaked sea salt. It's not jewish or anything like that, it's just the kind of salt they use in the koshering process to draw the blood out of the animal. The difference with table salt (as explained by Alton Brown) is that sea salt is more naturally grown (like a wheat ...


1

Golder's Green is a very Jewish neighborhood, and you can go to kosher markets there.


1

Try a Jewish delicatessen or jewish markets.



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