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30

Pardon my rampant vegerianism, but the trick is not to substitue meat at all. I generally get my nutrition from other sources, without using meat substitutes at all. Unless I really feel like a certain recipe that I used to like back in my meat-eating days. Use beans, lentils and whole grains for protein. Use nuts, seeds and avocadoes (or any other fatty ...


17

Meat lasagna minus meat will not be as satisfying - it'll be missing both a flavor and texture component. And tofu by itself does not have much flavor, especially compared to the rest of the lasagna. Substituting for meat is a broad question, as you'd see if you'd tried searching for vegetarian lasagna. If you're determined to make something that's as close ...


12

For many dishes mushrooms are a great meat replacement.


11

This probably depends a great deal on regional and political circumstances, but where I live (Toronto), there are dozens of Kosher and Halal grocery stores (or stores with Kosher or Halal sections), and in my experience, the meat is actually generally of worse quality. Halal, as it applies to meat, refers to which animals are allowed and the required method ...


10

Most gelling agents are derived from flora of some kind - usually plants or algae. Since they aren't derived from any animal, they are kosher and also vegan. The primary exception is gelatin, which is derived from animal bones. Gelatin is as kosher as the animal it came from and the conditions under which it was prepared; genuine kosher gelatin does exist ...


8

I'll try to weigh on in this as much as possible with a non-authoritative answer: First of all, I simply can't state this emphatically enough: kashering is not brining! A kosher bird is not "pre-brined", and professional chefs who claim that it is are either misinforming their audiences or simply misinformed themselves. Kashering (sometimes called ...


8

Yes! I was able to make a panna cotta using this product in a standard recipe with some minor changes. Just incorporate the Jell Dessert powder where the gelatin is called for and subtract 1/4-cup from the prescribed sugar. I started with this recipe on JoyofBaking.com. The recipe, like most I've seen, calls for one standard 1/4-ounce packet of gelatin. ...


7

Quorn based products are quite good meat substitutes. As a hardcore carnivore with a vegetarian partner I was pleasantly surprised at how edible her dishes such as stir fry and bolognese sauce are. The texture isn't at all strange, sludgy or bouncy and it's the closest thing to a meat texture (probably chicken more like) I've ever had that wasn't actually ...


6

Garbanzo beans (chickpeas) make for a delicious veggie burger. Grilled eggplant is also quite lovely.


6

There are a few aspects to consider, but will always boil down to "you have to ask the individual". Making a piece of cookware "safe" for a given person involves two components: Removing the contaminant in question in a manner that will prevent accidental ingestion of said contaminant. Making the item seem un-contaminated. At first glance this is similar ...


6

While some of the kosher rules are food-safety rules developed by the Israelite priests (or given by God), the prohibition against mixing meat and milk is because of an ancient ritual that involved cooking the meat of a slaughtered animal in its mother's milk, a religious practice forbidden in Exodus 34:26 "... You shall not boil a kid in its mother's ...


6

Alton Brown just generally prefers kosher salt, for reasons that don't really apply to peanut butter, which will be ground down anyway. What matters is the total weight of salt. Remember, kosher salt tends to weight approximately 1/2 as much (depending on brand) as table salt, per unit of volume. So you can replace the kosher salt with sea salt, or any ...


6

Depending on the dish, maybe duck confit. It works really well in tacos. It has the nice unctuous fat and goes well with tomatillo and avocado. But it'd probably be hard or expensive to get in large quantities.


5

Another factor to consider for kosher beef is that you will not be able to get all the cuts of meat. Because of issues with removing the sciatic nerve, kosher beef producers will only sell the front half of the cow -- the back half is generally sold to a non-kosher meat plant. So you cannot find kosher filet mignon in the US or Canada. (I've had it, but only ...


5

For meat, the answer is basically that the animal must have cloven hooves, and chew the cud. It must also be properly slaughtered, and the meat salted to remove the blood. There are all sorts of interesting edge cases to this, like giraffes, which are theoretically kosher animals, but no-one knows the way to slaughter them correctly. Also, fish (which must ...


5

I think you should take it out from your public library and take a good in depth look at it. This way you don't have to buy it and you can look at all the recipes. If you see enough recipes in there that you don't have to change, or just have to change minimally, then you can justify buying it. If your library doesn't carry it you could either get an ...


5

Generic replacements: Seitan: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheat_gluten_(food) Tofu Tempeh Commercial fake meats: Tofurkey (Roasts, Sausages, Deli Slices) Lightlife


5

My favorite meat replacement for lasagna is mushrooms, preferably a mix of the more hearty mushrooms like Shitake, Lion's Mane, Porcini or others. If those aren't available, most stores have "Baby Bella" or "Crimini", which are just the young version of the "big" Portobellas, and a darker variety (with a little more flavor) than the white button mushroom. ...


4

In the Israeli Army I've had a veal "parmesan" made with a tahini sauce. It's a very different dish, of course. It's also common to get beef/noodle recipes that don't include the dairy component. In general you're often better off substituting the meat (for fish, or a vegetarian patty like seitan) or working off of different recipes. Trying to make kosher ...


4

If you go to an Indian store you can find 'Nutrela.' It is dried soy protein. Very popular in India. They have chunks and mince. They are both nice, but I have only tried them Indian style.


4

In regard to the issues you've had with the Toffutti Sour Supreme...wait until you take it off the heat and stir it in right before serving. If it still breaks, then try stirring arrowroot powder, tapioca starch (avail. in Asian markets), or potato starch (about a tablespoon per cup of sour supreme) into it before adding to the stroganoff. These ...


4

I explained several of the differences in my answer to Brining a kosher bird and also discussed some issues relating to salt consistency in a much earlier answer to Chicken comes out salty... occasionally. To make a long story short, kashering is a long process with many steps, but the part you're concerned with is similar to the "dry brining" technique ...


4

While this isn't a definitive answer, I've given it some further thought and believe that my original suspicion is probably correct. That is, the saltiness is probably due to the chicken itself, and the kashrut is a likely root cause. For the benefit of anyone unfamiliar with the koshering process for poultry, in a nutshell it involves removing the ...


4

My mother had a similarly shaped pan with a lid that she'd use for baking coffee cake and such when camping. It was all aluminum and much less complicated (and likely not as useful) as what your talking about. The closest thing I found is the Omnia Oven. It looks they may be had for about $50.


4

Your issue revolves around 2 things: Some (not all by any means) vegans have a tendency to be a bit fanatical. Whatever cleaning you may do is strictly based on whether or not they want to 'accept' it. There's no 'official' guidelines, especially considering the different types of veganism. If you're worried about cross-contamination of fatty oils ...


4

You are not going to find any other meat with quite the same unctuous texture as pulled pork and mild but meaty flavor. Certainly no cut of beef will do so. If you feel compelled to use beef, use the corresponding cut of beef, which is the chuck. It will pull (although a little more shreddy), but it won't have the same texture, and it will have the ...


3

I tried my darndest to find a good answer for you, but I'm honestly not convinced that these are still being made! Here is a link to an antique one on Ebay. http://cgi.ebay.com/Antique-Wonder-Pot-Aluminum-Cooking-Baking-Israel-1950s-/350452375571?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item519896e013#ht_6415wt_1088


3

First ask yourself if the Dairy Ingredient is significant to the dish, some dishes can go without the dairy item. Olive oil for butter is the easiest example. I make Beef Stroganoff often, and I always put sour cream as an optional ingredient - garnish. My brother is lactose intolerant and he loves Stroganoff. Also, review some Kosher cook books, Joan ...


3

The best peanut butter, in my subjective opinion, contains peanuts and nothing else. Liquidize the nuts in a food processor until it's as smooth as you want it; and you're done. Peanut butter made this way might go a bit stiff if you leave it, but give it a good stir and it'll go back to normal. Good wholefood brands sell ready-made peanut butter of this ...



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