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10

I've noticed that most of that lamb flavor comes from where the lamb is raised. I have the opposite taste, I look for the distinct lamb flavor. I avoid American lamb and go for imported (AU/NZ) lamb because of this. You should look for lamb raised in the USA or Canada, it is generally much milder. If you're already buying that type here are some things to ...


8

The first thing I have to say is kebabs and overcooked are synonymous. If you want all your meats and/or veggies to be cooked right, I would advise you to put each item on it's own skewer so you can take them off as they are finished. As for a broiler and broiler plate functioning as a substitute for a grill, I would say that it won't be an exact ...


8

For the times I've done gyros as such, you basically make a 'paste' out of it in the food processor. Throw ground lamb in and give it a whirl, mix your spices and such in, put it on a spit, fridge to give a bit hard, and then on the spit. It comes out with a texture like that. That's how that kind is often done. For 'proper' tasting meat (more like the ...


8

Breast of lamb (or veal) is what would be called the belly on a pig -- it's the relatively thin and flat layer of muscle and fat surrounding the ribcage. As such, the bones that you have are in fact ribs, and they're quite easy to remove from the remainder of the meat. Because of the muscle that's between the bones, connecting them, they can be treated as ...


6

I like to add some extra comments to this post and also may give some criticism of the recipe. 1.Background of the problem As @rfusca said, cooking too long is a bad thing, which is true in some way. However, I think it's too broad to conclude cooking too long is the ultimate reason. There are parts of beef that they get tender as you cooking longer such ...


5

Yup, cooking most meat too long is a bad thing. Cooking lamb too long like that will result in rubber. Its also possible that you accidentally cut with the grain instead of against it - which would result in a very chewy, rubber like texture. You end up with long proteins that are harder to chew. When you cut across the grain, its a bunch of very short ...


5

When any meat is sliced thinly you know it is done when it is seared on the outside, that's really it. The 6 minutes in the recipe sounds like too long to me depending on how thinly you've sliced your lamb, I'd halve the time myself. 30 seconds with the lamb, then add the garlic, stir fry for 1 minute and thirty seconds, then add the herbs until wilted, then ...


4

You want the ones that look like little tiny T-bone steaks. Typically they are called Lamb Chops, but look first as there are different cuts under that name. You might also consider doing a rack, which is the equivalent to a Rib Roast, but obviously much smaller. For the rack, I'd sear it in a pan, and then broil it until done. (15-25 minutes, 140-160 ...


4

In the UK I'd use a cut called lamb leg steak, as you can prepare it in a similar way to beef steak. Personally I prefer to griddle on one side, flip over and finish in a hot oven. Make sure you rest it! I know recipe requests are a bit ugh here, but I'd recommend making the lamb steaks a little bit spiced (rub with cumin, chilli & coriander) and serve ...


4

Shoulder is a tough cut. I think you will probably find it a bit chewy if you've cooked it at 190ºC for 52 minutes. In future, preheat the oven to maximum, place the lamb in a roasting tin, cover the tin with foil, put the tin in the oven, then immediately turn the oven down to 150ºC, and leave it for 4 hours. After that time, take it out of the oven and let ...


4

If a recipe asks for a boned piece of meat, this indeed means that the bone is removed. I think the easiest and cleanest way of doing this is just asking your butcher. As for doing it yourself, there a some videos available online, e.g. this one. Since your meat is a bit smaller, I would suggest to lower the temperature a bit (to 340F) and leave it in the ...


4

You answered your own question. Add cold water and break up the clumps with your hands. My Italian grandfather used this method for his meat sauce. I also see hot dog stands use the same technique to make their chili sauce. So long as you don't boil all of the liquid away the meat will not clump.


4

Hooves are generally not eaten directly but make great soup. If you Google 'trotter soup', you will find recipes from many different culinary traditions, most of them middle-eastern or from the Indian sub-continent. This page has some typical recipes: http://www.khanapakana.com/recipe-search/s/trotter Although trotter generally means pig's hooves in the ...


3

In answer to "And is this authentic or just an American bastardization of the authentic gyro meats?", it could be American bastardization, or just lazy cafe owners? Shawarma is made by stacking strips of meat on the skewer. Like spokes on a bicycle wheel, where the skewer is the hub. One end of a strip goes on the skewer, the other hangs out The meat is ...


3

Being Greek I don't paticularly like this kind of lamb. It's really a compressed meat loaf if you ask me. But you can watch Alton Brown make this version on Good Eats http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MabT40VRvZk In your first photo I prefer when the meats are stacked up like on the left side. You can also use ground beef, lamb, chicken or pork season them ...


3

In the past when I've cooked in the ground I put rocks into the fire. Don't really know what sort of rocks, but I've been involved in sessions that use bricks. Point is that you needs some way to "envelope" the heat around the thing you are cooking so what we did was put the rocks into the fire to heat them up. Carefully remove the rocks before putting ...


3

Alton Brown demonstrates using a piece of string to scrape the bone clean. First he cuts and trims the bulk of the meat down to where he wants it. Then, he uses a string tied to a garage door handle (very cheap at any hardware store). Loop it around the bone a couple of times and pull, and it cleans it right up.


3

Roast Lamb Loin is very easy. 30mins per 500g on 180 degrees. Seasoned with salt is the minimum; however it's easy to add Rosemary or Mint. It works very well with a large range of sides including salads, purees, or roast vegetables. A good wine match is a full bodied red such as Sharaz or Syrah.


3

According to Kenji Alt's experiements (admittedly with beef), the major effect of the bone is insulation, which matters in a high-heat cooking environment, but not in sous-vide. See: Do Bones Add Favor To Meat For sous-vide cooking, the bone adds little value, other than appearance. It may also make it harder to put the product in your bag and seal it ...


2

I love lamb burgers. You grind lamb, then mix it with onions and various spices. You then put them on a spit and either broil them in the oven or cook them on a grill. You serve inside grilled pita them with tzatziki (a yogurt and cucumber sauce) and taboulleh (a bulghur salad). The latter is optional, it's just a nice side dish.


2

You can't go past Lamb Backstrap . It does everything a steak does in regards to cooking, remains very juicy and tender. You can wrap in prosciutto , serve with soft polenta. Basically whatever your imagination can come up with it will suit this cut.Only down side is the price to purchase, but well worth it for a romantic dinner.


2

Generically speaking meat that is appropriate for a braise is tougher and has connective tissue that can be turned to gelatin by the long slow cooking process. As you've noted, meat that is tender can be "cooked to death" using that same method, so I would, generally, recommend against using a braise. However, a stove top braise can go quickly without ...


2

I don't think the amount will matter too much for cooking, just may take a bit longer, but a thermotor should help there. What I would consider doing is make the crown out of the three like you had planned and cook the fourth seperatly (but at the same time). When the lamb is done carve the extra rack (by the single bone) and use it to garnish the crown ...


2

My local lamb (grass paddock raised) just doesn't have enough fat on it to survive a "rack in the oven" experience. Hogget & mutton is fine. This may be your problem too? So for lamb I would cleave the rack into individual ribs and BBQ on medium-high till the surface has crisped (typically twice as long as a similar beef cut). All the fat should have ...


2

If I'm correct, the cut you have should resemble a rack of ribs. If this is the case, you should be able to simply push the bones out, perhaps with a bit of loosening with a small sharp knife. I assume you need it boned to facilitate stuffing, but on the off chance it's not, you could just slow-cook the lamb for 4 or 5 hours by which point the bones will ...


2

There is no standard spice mix for Doner Kebabs. This generally applies to any food in any part of the world. There can be a common mix, but as you have experienced, they can be quite specific to certain areas of the world A major factor for noting a common spice mix is the global food supply industry. What happens in general is that food retailers buy bulk ...


1

You've got two questions, with 2 different approaches: What is the "authentic" spice mix used in your local region? and What is the spice mix that most appeals to you (or your eaters/customers)? I'm in NYC, and there are easily 100's of gyro, kebab & shwarma food trucks, plus a host of "authentic" and "fusion-style" Middle Eastern/N. African/W. Asian ...


1

I tend to ensure that when boning you trim to uniform thickness. It's important for cooking time, and to make sure that you don't get overcooked sections. I'd drop the temp slightly, and drop the cooking time by 5 minutes. Give it 5 minutes longer to rest. I'm not familiar with the recipe - is it a rolled leg, or BBQ'd? If it's rolled - I wouldn't be so ...


1

AS for butterflying - that depends on the cooking method. If you're roasting I would truss it up into a roast shape. So, back into a rolled package shape. If you're grilling outside then I would butterfly it. I've found that on the grill (unless you have a rotisserie, which would be great here) it's better to cook it thinner so it's not too crisp on the ...


1

Gyro meat blocks are essentially meat loaves - bread crumbs are a common ingredient, as are other things you'd find in a meatloaf recipe. Here's one creative person's approach to both a homemade gyro cooker and the meat block to cook on it.



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