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36

There is considerable overlap between cupcakes and muffins. Method From a technical point of view, muffins are made by the muffin method, making them small quickbreads. In the muffin method, the wet ingredients are combined in one bowl; and the dry ingredients are combined in another bowl. Then the two are quickly incorporated together with minimal ...


19

There really is no practical difference; the dictionary definition of a soup is: a liquid food made by boiling or simmering meat, fish, or vegetables with various added ingredients. Which also applies to any stew you can conceive of. The technical, highly-nuanced difference is that of emphasis and intent. Stewing is a method of cooking the solids ...


14

True southern grits are made with ground hominy whereas polenta is simply ground cornmeal. The proper name for them is actually hominy grits. You can make "grits" out of untreated corn, but these are corn grits and not really found in southern US cuisine. Grits are typically a much coarser grind than polenta. Hominy is corn that has been nixtamalized, which ...


12

I am quite sure that it 1. doesn't have a name, and 2. is obsolete. I read of this technique in a book on traditional English cooking (turns out that it was very similar to French cooking some centuries ago). Back then, meat was always roasted over an open fire. The fire is a hot and uneven source of heat, and they always had huge pieces of meat in a ...


10

It's actually understandable why this would be confusing to non-Americans, because the terms "teaspoon" and "tablespoon" actually have two meanings - one in cooking and one in dining. Historically, teaspoons and tablespoons were simply two types of silverware. Teaspoons were literally for stirring tea or other liquids. Tablespoons were used for serving. ...


10

According to Wikipedia: Scallions (also known as green onions, spring onions, salad onions, green shallots, onion sticks, or syboes), are the edible plants of various Allium species, all of which are "onion-like", having hollow green leaves and lacking a fully developed root bulb. In the grocery stores I've been to most (east cost of US), if they ...


9

Savory, called Umami in Japanese, implies the presence of Glutamates, the carboxylate anions and salts of the amino acid glutamic acid. The identification Glutamate receptors on the tongue only took place in the past decade, although the ability of the tongue to detect glutamates has long been know. In the early Twentieth Century, a Japanese scientist ...


9

I'm not familiar with the naming conventions for sugar in the UK so I apologize if I become patronizing. Granulated sugar is the every-day table sugar here. It's what I grab a spoonful for my cereal and such, and it is the kind used in almost all of the baking I've done. Is caster sugar what you usually have around? Caster sugar is called "super-fine" ...


9

In Britain (and France), the large purple varieties are known as aubergines. Other (pale and/or small) varieties aren't usually found outside of Asian supermarkets, where I imagine they are still referred to as brinjal. The name 'eggplant' is used in the US, Canada, and the Antipodes, mainly because the lighter varieties are more common there, which ...


9

I am quite sure it doesn't have a name in English. There is the traditional Bulgarian dish mish mash (миш маш), which is an example of what you describe. It never contains chicken, and the classic version prescribes that the vegetables have to be tomatoes and red peppers. But variations are possible, e.g. adding onions and/or feta cheese. It is always ...


9

According to the University of Minnesota Extension (emphasis added): What causes the wild or gamey taste in venison? Venison refers to the meat of antlered animals such as deer, moose, elk and caribou. The 'wild' flavor of venison is directly related to what the animal eats. Corn fed deer will have a milder flavor than those that eat acorns or ...


8

In cooking, "Savory" does generally refer to a flavor profile that is anything other than sweet. "Sweet" doesn't have to necessarily be sugary sweet...basil, tarragon, fennel, carrots, beets, etc. have sweet flavors that are not excessively sugary sweet. The term "neutral" is typically used for things like crepes and choux paste (eclair paste) because when ...


8

Is there some dialectical thing going on here? I have always known stews as stovetop and casseroles as baked, just as Jared said in his comment. See for example on wikipedia: stew vs. casserole; or in Merriam-Webster: stew (click the verb form) vs. casserole. (Casserole refers to the dish as well as the food cooked in it; it's pretty definitely something you ...


8

I don't know the term either. I don't think it is established baking slang, so it is bound to vary between recipes, should you find it in another one at all. But if you got it from a bread recipe, it must be because you need optimal conditions for your yeast. The optimal temperature for yeast rising is 35°C, with rising being too slow below that (but it will ...


8

It's not that simple. Every culture cuts their beef differently (or not at all!) and therefore has different names for it Around the Belgium, Dutch, French low lands they call what the US call brisket and flank, just flank. And what other parts of France might call brisket is not always cut separately, it is just part of the chuck Confused, we are... Many ...


7

You'll want to look for one of two products either lait fermenté or lait ribot. Lait fermenté is a cultured buttermilk. This is homogenized and pasteurized milk which has been cultured with lactic acid bacteria. This is the de facto standard buttermilk in modern times. If you go to an American grocery store and buy buttermilk you are buying cultured ...


7

In my book, this is pretty trivial. Wasabi is absolutely a spice - it's something with a very specific flavor, derived from a plant, that can be used in fairly small quantities to add flavor to something. It's not spicy (spicy hot, piquant) in the normal sense, though. It doesn't contain capsaicin. It is hot in some sense: it contains allyl isothiocyanate, ...


6

Generally, slow-cooking means any food preparation method which relies on using low-heat for a long amount of time. Barbecues, smokers, luau pits, and low-heat ovens could all qualify. The benefit of slow-cooking, generally, is that food becomes incredibly tender, as all of its connective tissues break down. Also, flavor can infuse over time and provide ...


6

It's a regional preference on what they're called. When you're buying seeds, they're also called "bunching onions", and I grew up calling them "scallions", although I think that scallion specifically don't have a bulb yet formed, while green/spring onions might. update : A little research suggests that "spring onion" is the preferred term in the UK, AU and ...


6

Traditionally roasting used radiant heat to cook meat. This would have taken place over an open flame, typically on a rotating spit. In modern times this method is now called Rotisserie. Modern roasting refers to dry heat cooking that takes place in an oven, the food is cooked by convection. Until the late 19th century this method was referred to as baking. ...


6

I've been trying to do a little research on this this, and I know that "ground beef" and "minced beef" are functionally similar, but I'm trying to verify that they're actually the same thing (as "mincing" and "grinding" are different processes.) As they're produced from a different processes, it's possible that there might be some slight differences between ...


6

The problem is, both Sarge's and Carmi's answers are right depending on who is using the word. Some people use the word seasoning to just mean salt, some mean salt and pepper, and some mean "anything you want to use to bring the flavor to the desired point, including salt, pepper, lemon juice, spices, herbs, etc." If you are dealing with someone in person, ...


6

I don't think that the word exists at all. "Overboiling" and "overcooking" always implies an undesirable result. Else, you have to exactly describe what you are doing, which depends on the dish. Update: native speakers tell me that overboiling is not a real word in English. But I would have liked it to be :) "Simmer for hours on low flame" is the term I ...


5

Single cream is milk product with 5% butterfat. Double cream has 48% butterfat. Neither are common in the US. If you can find clotted cream, which is 55% fat, then there is a chance of making double cream at home by diluting it. As some clotted creams have a cooked taste, there may be other solutions.


5

It is a joke. Coconut curry tapenade with toast points is ridiculous to begin with, and it is intended to be funny that a big burly man craves something that is supposed to sound dainty? or elegant? I'm sure you can quite possibly make a dish and call it this. However, I can't imagine olives, coconut milk, and curry tasting very good.


5

In addition to Joe's great answer, in my childhood (where they were usually called 'bakes' (the food), but they came out of a 'casserole' (the vessel).) I learned two other important differences: time. A 'stew' was never done in less than 2 hours. It wasn't uncommon for it to bubble away in the crock pot or a dutch oven for 4 or 5 hours. A 'bake' by ...


5

You can normally use the guideline that 1 teaspoon is equal to 5 ml and 1 tablespoon is equal to 15 ml. However, do make sure that the website is American and not Australian, as the tablespoon measurement as used in that country equals 20 ml. There's a helpful table comparing the definition of the teaspoon and tablespoon measurements as used in different ...


5

Generally speaking, a pie refers to a pastry covered with a lid, like a typical apple pie. A tart is open topped, like a quiche, or a French tartes aux pommes. However, there are exceptions to this: many pies will be open topped too. Usually this is a matter of depth: the deeper it is, the more likely it is to be called a pie rather than a tart. Regional ...


5

I think the Danish use the English style cutting and names not the US style, so direct translation is not really possible. The round is often just English "Roast Beef" The main part of the round we would call topside, which is Danish is Inderlår og klump (topside and rump) The top part we call Silverside is the "Culotte" (leg) There are other ...


5

In Canada, we have lots of different types of bacon. I believe in the states, "Canadian" Bacon, as far as I know generally refers to back bacon. Standard Bacon (Also called, side Bacon, Strip Bacon; which comes from the belly), is usually just known as "Bacon". I believe this is true in the states. What happens when you just ask for "Bacon, please!"? ...



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