Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

57

There is considerable overlap between cupcakes and muffins. Method From a technical point of view, muffins are made by the muffin method, making them small quickbreads. In the muffin method, the wet ingredients are combined in one bowl; and the dry ingredients are combined in another bowl. Then the two are quickly incorporated together with minimal ...


57

Found in this wiki article , is the following information: "Fancy" ketchup Some ketchup in the U.S. is labeled "Fancy". This is a USDA grade, relating to specific gravity. Fancy ketchup has a higher tomato solid concentration than other USDA grades. USDA Ketchup Grades Grade Specific Gravity Total Solids Fancy 1.15 ...


48

I suspect it means "ditto (the above line)": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ditto_mark seems to indicate that "do." was an old way of abbreviating before the ditto mark (") became widespread.


40

Short answer? Not a damn thing. The term is pretty much meaningless in the US; at best it only means that the product doesn't have artificial colors, flavors or synthetic "stuff". From the FDA: What is the meaning of 'natural' on the label of food? From a food science perspective, it is difficult to define a food product that is 'natural' because ...


31

Liqueur is essentially a flavoured distilled spirit, with the important distinction of added sugar. Vermouth is not distilled, which is why it's referred to as a fortified wine. Flavoured vodkas usually have no added sugar, and so are not classed as liqueurs. Campari uses both distilled alcohol and sugar, and so is a liqueur. Have a flow chart: And a Venn ...


27

"Fancy," when used in the labeling of foods, is almost invariably tied to USDA standards for the classification and grading of the foods. Foods traded on the wholesale market are not required to grade their foods - the use of the system is voluntary. The USDA grading names tied to different food types aren't always consistent or intuitive. Examples: ...


22

There really is no practical difference; the dictionary definition of a soup is: a liquid food made by boiling or simmering meat, fish, or vegetables with various added ingredients. Which also applies to any stew you can conceive of. The technical, highly-nuanced difference is that of emphasis and intent. Stewing is a method of cooking the solids ...


21

Graphics and quoted text from: Whole Grains Council Grains, by definition, have 3 major parts: the germ, the endosperm, and the bran. Whole grains are those that have all of the parts of the natural seed, or kernel (not including an exterior husk that is generally inedible). To be called "Whole Grain" the product must still have all of the bran, ...


20

Here's a picture of some raw ground beef from the Wikipedia ground beef article so that you can see for yourself. Basically it is beef that has been run through a meat grinder, great for making taco meat, hamburgers, and the like.


18

It's nutmeg. The author of that blog is from Switzerland, so I imagine that term is used there, but I had never heard used culinarily until now. I Googled "Grated Musk", and still had to look around to be sure. Thanks for teaching me something. EDIT As of an hour after the question was posted: Click the "Grated Musk" link now! This question is now the top ...


17

Noodles, pasta and dumplings Polish pierogi and Russian pirozhki (пирожки) Despite having the same Slavic root meaning "pie", the Polish pierogi are unleavened dough dumplings stuffed with various fillings, most commonly boiled or fried. On the other hand, Russian pirozhki are usually fried (but sometimes baked) buns stuffed with similar fillings. The ...


17

To expand on Jolene's answer, there is not only no official definition, but the only definition which fits its common usage is A food which a certain group of persons is not afraid to eat. Philosophically, "natural" is the opposite of "artificial" or "man-made", but philosophy doesn't give us a limit of interaction under which something stays "natural. ...


16

Yes, it is the same as minced beef. American versus English english.


16

US : jam/jelly/preserves/etc In the US, there are specific definitions from the Food & Drug Administration on what can be labeled as jam, jelly, etc. From CookingLight.com, but preserved here in case of link rot: Jelly is a clear, bright product. It is generally made by cooking fruit juice and sugar with pectin as a jelling agent and lemon juice as ...


16

Omakase. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omakase


14

True southern grits are made with ground hominy whereas polenta is simply ground cornmeal. The proper name for them is actually hominy grits. You can make "grits" out of untreated corn, but these are corn grits and not really found in southern US cuisine. Grits are typically a much coarser grind than polenta. Hominy is corn that has been nixtamalized, which ...


13

Narrowing the question to just Natural Flavor, we have Code of Federal Regulations Title 21: (3) The term natural flavor or natural flavoring means the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit ...


13

I think it's nutmeg. The author of that blog is from Switzerland, and nutmeg is muscade in French and Muskat in German. It's also something that'd taste fine in the dishes she uses it in.


12

I am quite sure that it 1. doesn't have a name, and 2. is obsolete. I read of this technique in a book on traditional English cooking (turns out that it was very similar to French cooking some centuries ago). Back then, meat was always roasted over an open fire. The fire is a hot and uneven source of heat, and they always had huge pieces of meat in a ...


12

According to the University of Minnesota Extension (emphasis added): What causes the wild or gamey taste in venison? Venison refers to the meat of antlered animals such as deer, moose, elk and caribou. The 'wild' flavor of venison is directly related to what the animal eats. Corn fed deer will have a milder flavor than those that eat acorns or ...


11

I have heard something similar to what you're describing called a "scramble". It's usually what I wind up with when I'm out of practice with making omelettes.


11

In my book, this is pretty trivial. Wasabi is absolutely a spice - it's something with a very specific flavor, derived from a plant, that can be used in fairly small quantities to add flavor to something. It's not spicy (spicy hot, piquant) in the normal sense, though. It doesn't contain capsaicin. It is hot in some sense: it contains allyl isothiocyanate, ...


11

Both involve boiling water, but there are a number of differences: blanching has two meanings -- it's mainly used when talking about setting (or enhancing) the color of vegetables, with minimal cooking (only the outermost layer is cooked). As such, it's typically only a few seconds to a minute dip in already boiling water, followed by a shock (dip in ice ...


10

Some more... US = UK Skillet = Frying pan Ground beef = mince (sometimes minced beef) Grilling = BBQ Chips = Crisps Fries = French Fries (sometimes chips) Steak Fries = Chips Green onions/scallions = spring onions Burner = Hob (the bit you put the pan on, on top of the stove) Granola = muesli (in terms of breakfast cereal) Granola bar = just cereal bar ...


10

I'm not familiar with the naming conventions for sugar in the UK so I apologize if I become patronizing. Granulated sugar is the every-day table sugar here. It's what I grab a spoonful for my cereal and such, and it is the kind used in almost all of the baking I've done. Is caster sugar what you usually have around? Caster sugar is called "super-fine" ...


10

It's actually understandable why this would be confusing to non-Americans, because the terms "teaspoon" and "tablespoon" actually have two meanings - one in cooking and one in dining. Historically, teaspoons and tablespoons were simply two types of silverware. Teaspoons were literally for stirring tea or other liquids. Tablespoons were used for serving. ...


10

A 'pinch' is the amount of powder/whatever that can be trapped between one's thumb and fore finger.


10

It doesn't compare at all - broiling is the US term for what is called grilling in UK. The heat source is above the food. In the US, a "grill" is used to mean a "gas powered barbeque", as the Brits would say. The heat source is below the food.


10

According to Wikipedia: Scallions (also known as green onions, spring onions, salad onions, green shallots, onion sticks, or syboes), are the edible plants of various Allium species, all of which are "onion-like", having hollow green leaves and lacking a fully developed root bulb. In the grocery stores I've been to most (east cost of US), if they ...


9

Savory, called Umami in Japanese, implies the presence of Glutamates, the carboxylate anions and salts of the amino acid glutamic acid. The identification Glutamate receptors on the tongue only took place in the past decade, although the ability of the tongue to detect glutamates has long been know. In the early Twentieth Century, a Japanese scientist ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible