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3

The sludge you speak of is actually proteins called myosin (denatures at 120f) and actin (denatures at 150f) going through the stages of denaturing, coagulation and ultimately gelantization. Protein coagulates when it is denatured, that is destroyed. Gelatization is a follow on the process of breakdown in connective tissue.


0

The problem is that if a small tribe crushes and sun dries a beetle with a stone or heavy wood and ads it to a dish for colour then it would be 'artesenal' where as if the exact same outcome was achieved in a machine production line it would be called 'processed'.


13

I think it's nutmeg. The author of that blog is from Switzerland, and nutmeg is muscade in French and Muskat in German. It's also something that'd taste fine in the dishes she uses it in.


18

It's nutmeg. The author of that blog is from Switzerland, so I imagine that term is used there, but I had never heard used culinarily until now. I Googled "Grated Musk", and still had to look around to be sure. Thanks for teaching me something. EDIT As of an hour after the question was posted: Click the "Grated Musk" link now! This question is now the top ...


6

By a strange coincidence, NRC (a Dutch quality newspaper) published a report this weekend (7 Feb 2015) that EU law allows flavors created by genetically modified yeasts in bio-reactors to be described as "natural" (since yeast fermentation is a a natural process). Link. Unfortunately the article is in Dutch and for subscribers only, but the title and header ...


17

To expand on Jolene's answer, there is not only no official definition, but the only definition which fits its common usage is A food which a certain group of persons is not afraid to eat. Philosophically, "natural" is the opposite of "artificial" or "man-made", but philosophy doesn't give us a limit of interaction under which something stays "natural. ...


13

Narrowing the question to just Natural Flavor, we have Code of Federal Regulations Title 21: (3) The term natural flavor or natural flavoring means the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit ...


4

From Consumer Reports: Most consumers would probably be surprised to learn that the FDA has not developed a formal definition for use of the term "natural" or its derivatives. But the agency has not objected to the use of the term if "nothing artificial or synthetic (including all color additives regardless of source) has been included in, or has been ...


39

Short answer? Not a damn thing. The term is pretty much meaningless in the US; at best it only means that the product doesn't have artificial colors, flavors or synthetic "stuff". From the FDA: What is the meaning of 'natural' on the label of food? From a food science perspective, it is difficult to define a food product that is 'natural' because ...


1

Note there are specific European Union regulations that define the terms "milk" and "dairy". This article from the Food Standards Agency (UK) summarises this: Guidance On Legislation On The Protection Of Definitions And Designations In Respect Of Milk And Milk Products Specifically it says: The terms ‘dairy’ and ‘milk and milk products’ are used ...


3

I will disagree with Johanna here. While hers sounds like a reasonable definition, it is not how the word is used in practice. Milk is A) Cow's (also goat's, sheep's, camel's and mare's) lactated fluid, or B) Any liquid which kinda looks like A), doesn't have an overly strong taste, and there is a convention of being called a milk. It can in many cases ...


0

Milk is a stable emulsion of fat in water, basically tiny drops of fat suspended in water. To qualify as milk, rather than cream, or whipping cream, it has a certain fat percentage, usually less than 3%. This is why really low fat milk tastes like water: it is basically water. Such a stable emulsion can be produced in lots of ways, including by cows or goats ...



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