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5

Gordon says "white sauce", which is a simpler term for bechamel-based sauces and is quite common when making lasagna. Yet the stuff that gets stirred in the bowl looks somewhat "fluffier" than classic bechamel and when it's piped has a "raggedness" that plain bechamel doesn't have, but smoother that pure ricotta. My conclusion: it's hard to say for certain,...


3

I agree with the texture issue. I had luck this week using real - not light - sour cream instead of ricotta. I combined provolone, mozzarella and the sour cream togther before adding the additional ingredients.


3

Lasagne al forno is a pasticcio. So is pretty much any pasta al forno. Lasagna is one of many pasticcios you could make -- unless you're talking to a Bolognese, in which case they'll insist that the only proper name for the lasagne dish is lasagne -- or better, lasagne Bolognese of course :) Only person on the Internet I've seen that gets it right: http://...


2

Turkey and lasagna are both fine at 350F (177C). For turkey, here's a guide at 350F. From AllRecipes: Take the turkey out to rest when the thickest part of the thigh registers 160F (71C). Carry over will bring it to 165F (74C). (Picture from Fine Cooking) Your lasagna will be fine too, it just needs to cook a bit longer at 350F. Consider it done when ...


2

The turkey is going to be quite happy with the slightly lower temp - you will need a bit more time, but I'd guestimate 1/2 hour tops should be ok. This is another occasion to repeat our all important: Use a thermomenter to determine doneness of your roast, not a timer! The lasagna shouldn't be a problem either - I'm surprised at the long baking time ...


2

Unless your garlic has fungus growing on it or is badly discolored it's unlikely this flavor is from it. Garlic generally keeps very well and is still safe to use, and still flavorful even when it's a bit shriveled. It's much more likely these off flavors are coming from another ingredient, and could be a sign of some sort of contamination, in which case ...


1

Whether the pasta is rolled for cannelloni or flat for lasagne won't make a difference, just make sure that the tops of the rolls are covered with sauce, too, or they will dry out and taste not nice. For the pros and cons of fresh vs. dried pasta in "al forno" dishes, see the almost duplicate lasagne Q/A.


1

No, you cannot salvage it. First, once a flavor is in a dish, there is no way to remove it. Masking it slightly (which diverts the attention from it but does not remove it) and dilution are possibilities, but removal isn't. Second, mildew is mold, and many species of mold are toxic to humans. As there is no way to find out if yours is toxic or harmless, ...


1

Also try sieving or blending the cottage cheese first, if you don't like the texture but don't mind its subtle flavour. It changes the texture totally, and my husband will happily eat it in pasta dishes, even though he doesn't like the texture usually.


1

I make a white sauce using the mozzarella cheese. Since I use non-fat milk to make the sauce, it cuts down on calories. This has always worked very well in my lasagna recipe.


1

I make lasagna without boiling the noodles all the time! I have also made other noodle casseroles without first cooking the noodles. If your sauce is "wet" enough or if you add a little extra water to your sauce, it cooks fine! Most of the dishes I make, bake for about an hour and that is plenty for plumped up noodles with the same texture as boiled ahead. I ...


1

I've been cooking lasagne for the past 15 years and never had a problem with instant sheets. I use meat sauce, cheese sauce and the sheets, I cook for about 30-35 minutes in a moderate oven and stick a knife through the layers to check if it's done. Occasionally it will need an extra 5-10 minutes cooking time. I love fresh pasta in every other instance but ...


1

I was a food service specialist. The danger zone is 40°F to 140°F (4°C to 60°C). Food can be kept in the danger zone no more then 4 hours. That being said it would be fine to leave in the oven until your guest arrive with the oven turned off after backing. Reheat at 350 for 1/2 hour before serving. Your lasagna wouldn't be in the danger zone 4 hours.



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