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5

I've never used ricotta or any soft cheese on my lasagne - I wonder if it is an Italian American convention. I use bechamel sauce, mozarella and parmesan, and it works very well.


5

It's true. I've done it quite a few times, before the 'no boil' packaged varieties were commonly available (if they even existed ... this was ~15 years ago) Unfortunately, I haven't done it for many years, so I'm quite out of practice. (found out I had a problem with dairy, so lasagne isn't something I make anymore) From what I remember, you needed to ...


4

There is no way to answer this. An exact calculation is next to impossible, anyway. An educated guess would have to take into account the temperature at which the lasagna is frozen, the setting you choose for your oven, the lasagna thickness, and the temperature at which you want to eat it, and will still be way too inexact, something like "between 45 and 75 ...


3

I have cooked Lasagna, cooled it overnight in the refrigerator, cut the Lasagna in portions, vacuum sealed and froze the portions. I have received all positive feedback on the Lasagna.


3

The main difference is lasagna tends to have wide flat noodles, and tends to be a dish made within the inspirations of the Italian cuisine. Pasticcio tends to use other pastas (such as penne), and the flavor elements may be inspired by the greater variety of flavors found around the Mediterranean, such as cinnamon in a Greek-based version. Both are ...


2

Use any fresh cheese like fior di latte, bocconcini, or fresh mozzarella with a little bit of fresh parmesan. It depends on the region, some people use non cheese sauces like béchamel and even some use orange cheddar. If you like a fresh and subtle tasting lasagna without the gritty texture of ricotta, a nice mix of fior di latte and fresh mozzarella ...


2

Reheating a lasagna is much like cooking it in the first place: you simply want to bring it up to serving temperature (although the second time you are not so worried about browning the top). Because you are simply heating it through until it is hot enough to be enjoyable, assuming you have thawed it first, it is going to take about the same length of time ...


2

In Italy, when we refer to Pasticcio we are usually referring to other kind of pasta rather than the lasagna noodle. As almost the totally of the italian dishes obviously this differ from the part of Italy you're referring, and so the ingredients could change. The classic lasagna is made with ragù and besciamella, as the pasticcio, but I simply love the ...


1

I had never heard of Pasticcio before until I saw my favorite chef "Ina Garten" makes it on food network. However, she did not use lasagna noodles. My understanding is that Pasticcio is the Greek version of Italian baked pasta. Another strange thing about it is that it has cinnamon in it which I personally will not do. Here is the link to that recipe. ...


1

Lasagne is the Italian name for the noodles used in a lasagna casserole. So it would be technically incorrect to use it for a casserole made with a different type of noodles. And I'm not aware of any other use of lasagne noodles, so while you will probably have to call your soup "lasagne soup" if it contains them, and Italians will also use the term "lasagne ...


1

TVP (Textured Vegetable Protein) is a great meat substitute. It's easier to season than tofu, seitan, and tempeh (IMHO). Sautee a half onion add in some spices to match the dish then add in 1:1 ratio of vegan beef stock, chicken, or vegetable stock. Bring to a boil then cover and remove from heat for 15-20 minutes. TVP is the left over protein strands from ...


1

When I make lasagne to put in the freezer, I do not bake it first. For me, the best way to freeze it is using a sheet of Glad's Press-N-Seal over the top of the lasagna, pressing down to get all the air out if you can, between the top layer (sauce/cheese) and your press-n-seal. You want more or less a vacuum seal (the cheap way). I seal my press-n-seal to ...


1

Once again I will bring up America's Test Kitchen (AKA Cook's Illustrated). They like the no-boil sheets, but they have experienced some of the same problems already brought up here. To ameliorate those issues, they recommend soaking the sheets for 10 minutes in hot tap water before use. I've done it, it works great.



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