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6

To answer this question we should turn to the oracle: http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/season3/Cookie/CookieTranscript.htm The relevant quote is: "Nothing affects a cookie's texture more than the melting characteristics of its fat. Butter has a sharp melting point meaning that, uh, just a few degrees difference between a solid and liquid states. So since ...


5

Sounds like it's working for you. As long as the dough doesn't form a skin, inhibiting rising, then looks like it ain't drying out. Very even heating too, I imagine; that's critical: with the hot and cold patches of some big ovens, uneven fermentation and rising could ruin a loaf especially the final proofing. Cracks in the sides of the crust can be blamed ...


5

If it is a quick bread then it should be chemically leavened with baking powder or soda. The presence, or absence, of sugar should not play a role at all in the working of baking powder. Where sugar may play a role, however, is in creaming the fat. If this recipe calls for solid fat such as butter or shortening then it will often also call for the sugar to ...


4

I imagine you have tried recipes already with an appropriate quantity of xanthum gum and starches... are you making any substitutions, or omitting ingredients? Substitutions really change the game significantly, even unwitting substitutions like sweet rice flour vs white rice flour, potato flour vs potato starch. Substituting an alternative flour directly ...


3

If your recipe relies on yeast to make it rise, Splenda will not work. Sugar is food for yeast: if it's zero calories for you, it's zero calories for the little yeastie beasties too.


2

The short answer to your question is YES. The extra acid in the ingredients will hamper the second act of the double acting baking powder. The acids are timed/staged for reaction not the baking soda. The Magic Baking Powder (happens to be in our kitchen, too) is mostly a single acting formula since monocalcium-phosphate is a low temperature acid (with ...


1

I think there's lots of things at play in your situation. Bread has many variables ("degrees of freedom"), and this is part of the reason that bread is so fun and so diverse (and so fun)! Experimentation is warranted here, I think. There's many sourdough enthusiasts around here, so you'll probably get many different opinions. Take the suggestions you like ...


1

In making bread or pizza dough, there is no step called "leavening." While there is some variation in method, depending on whether a preferment is used, in general, the active culture (whether it is sourdough starter, commercial yeast, or a combination) is added very early in the development of the dough. The dough is then kneaded to develop gluten ...


1

I had limited success making gluten free bread. The best result I got was from the recipe at http://www.healthyfood.co.nz/recipes/2010/august/no-knead-gluten-free-bread , which resulted in a half-decent, moist loaf.


1

It's common practice to raise yeasted bread in a warm, humid environment -- it's what yeast like best. Professional bakers will often use a proof box that lets them control the temperature and humidity. Home bakers will often use a just-warm oven or a microwave oven (both turned off!) with a container of warm water. Using your dehydrator this way is ...


1

The faster you do your first rise on bread, the less complex the flavors. Unless you're in a hurry, a slow, long overnight rise in the fridge will result in better flavors. The enzymes in the bread will have more time to do their magic and convert the starch to sugar. If you need a quick second rise or you're working with a highly enriched dough and you ...


1

Splenda yields a lower content when making quick breads. In order to make it rise better, add an additional 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda per cup of Splenda used. Splenda doesn't react the same way as regular sugar would with the baking soda. Source: http://www.zenoplex.com/splenda/recipes/tips.htm


1

In addition to Splenda's front line product they also offer "Splenda Sugar Blend" which is a blend of sugar and Splenda which is what they recommend using for yeast breads: Yeast Breads Yeast breads rise well with SPLENDA® Sugar Blend. There is enough sugar present to feed the yeast, speed up fermentation, and aid in the browning of ...



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