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27

It can range on the size of the lemon and the time of year. A medium lemon will give 2-3 Tablespoons of juice, where a larger lemon can give 1/4 cup (4 Tablespoons). Just have to decide on much lemon flavor you want in your recipe as to which number you pick.


20

After searching different places, I could not find a clear answer. I therefor decided to measure it myselfe. I bought a bunch of normal sized lemons, and squeezed them. On average, the lemons I bought yelded 55ml, thats 3,67 tablespoons of juice per lemon.


18

When you find cheap lemons, buy a lot. Squeeze half a lemon in each of the cavities of an ice tray. Freeze. Within a day, remove the frozen slivers from the tray to a ziploc bag in the freezer. You now have measured units of fresh lemon juice you may use for cooking and will keep for months. The frozen lemons are a bit less acid than fresh juice, but ...


15

Let's start with a definition of cooking. The Oxford English Dictionary defines to cook as: To prepare or make ready (food); to make fit for eating by due application of heat, as by boiling, baking, roasting, broiling, etc. However, from a chemical point of view, what happens when you are cooking meat is that you are using heat, amongst other things, ...


10

Based on this site you can substitute the lemon juice for either an equal amounts of lime juice, an equal amount of white wine or half the required lemon amount of mild vinegar (like you mentioned)


6

It makes the lemon easier to squeeze. I think it has the most effect on the peel; it's softer and more flexible when warm, so you're able to get more juice out of it than you could otherwise if you're juicing by hand. That's especially true if you're trying to juice several lemons - you'll just get tired and stop being as thorough if it's harder. It ...


6

If you're doing it for the acid (i.e. to cut the heat in a spicy dish), you might try cream of tartar if you have it lying around. I've never actually tried to substitute tartar for lemon juice, but lemon juice is the most common substitution for cream of tartar, so it stands to reason that it works both ways. (Note: You would use about 1/3 as much cream of ...


6

Lemons are quite sour, while Meyer lemons are much sweeter and less acidic. If you substitute directly, it'll have a dramatic effect. For example, suppose you start out with a dessert made with lemons that has enough sugar added (or little enough lemon juice) to make it the right sweet/sour balance for you. If you replace the lemon with Meyer lemon, it'll ...


5

I also typically use bottled lemon juice, as my budget does not allow for fresh lemons. Stilltasty says you should use the bottle within a week, but I've had success with keeping it much, much longer. That said, this is one item that will not usually work well past its best-by date, I've found. Maybe in the future, you could freeze it in cubes if you ...


5

Yes, it will work. The texture won't be different but the flavor will be significantly different. It will taste like lime hollandaise. :-P I imagine a lime hollandaise would taste great on fish and other seafood. I'm not entirely sure what you would do with lime mayonnaise though.


5

During cooking, heat, amongst causing other things like the Maillard Reaction, denatures (changes the structure of) proteins in meat. Acid is also a denaturant, and so affects the proteins in the same way. However, a mild acid like lemon juice isn't strong enough to kill bacteria, and it of course only affects the parts of the meat it can reach: consider ...


5

It sounds like fermentation to me. That's what you'd expect when you're making mead or hard apple cider. I'd personally dispose of it ... partially because I can't think of a good use for alcoholic lemon juice, but also because you don't know exactly what the bug is doing the fermentation.


5

Lemon juice thickens condensed milk in the same way it would "thicken" regular milk, i.e., by curdling. Basically, milk has two general types of proteins: casein and whey. The casein is what forms the "curds" in "curds and whey." Both proteins are somewhat unusual in that they don't tend to coagulate with heat (as eggs proteins do, for example). Thus, ...


5

When I've used Meyer lemons I haven't noticed Mandarin orange flavors. Meyer lemons are much sweeter and less sour than normal lemons. I use them in recipes that strongly feature lemon fruit, not just juice. For example, shaker lemon pies are made with thin slices of whole lemons, including the peel. Regular lemons are overwhelming so I use Meyers. On the ...


4

In my 900W microwave it takes 1/2 inch water 1 minute to boil and around 30 seconds to become hand-hot, (I know it may take a bit longer when heating a lemon with the skin acting like an insulator although this effect will be lessened due to the high oil content of the zest). You probably won't 'boil' the lemon however if you did it would produce by far the ...


4

I live in Vermont and bought a lemon to squeeze for a recipe and got 5 plus tablespoons so I guess it can range from 3 to 4 to even more!


4

Yes, you can. In fact, many canning and jarring recipes specifically call for citric acid. Presumably you are using citric acid in its dried, crystalline form. In that case, a solution of around 4% citric acid (e.g. 4gm in 100ml of water) should be around the same strength as lemon juice.


4

They are harder to juice than regular lemons, at least with reamers or unaided, because the skin breaks apart much more easily (like a plump mandarin orange).


3

That will be absolutely fine, whether you make the sauce in the classic way by cooking the yolks with the lemon juice, or with one of the variations where the lemon juice is added only at the end. I would, of course, defrost it first, rather than add a whole ice cube of lemon juice to the pan.


3

With any food, when you are getting to months past the use by date, it would be wise to throw it out. Odds are that it is more an issue of the taste deteriorating, but why take any chances?


3

if your using the lemon juice for the acidic aspect then you can use 1/2 as much vinegar. However if it for flavoring I would substitute another juice such as lime or orange. Sometimes you can also you lemon extract for flavoring.


3

I just used lemon juice concentrate 1 1/2 years after the best-by date to cook with fish and it was fine. Citric acid is literally a preservative. Why not? What is supposed to preserve the preservatives?


3

This link http://www.livestrong.com/article/520416-how-to-substitute-lemon-juice-for-citric-acid/ says 1/4 teaspoon of citric acid substitutes 1 tablespoon of lemon juice. So for half a cup of lemon juice, use two teaspoons of citric acid, and compensate for the missing liquid.


2

Whenever I have to substitute something I have to remember I am no longer making the same thing as what was in the recipe or that I had started with. With that in mind I am more free to create then to agonize over trying to recreate. I have had some great success with this, and some that should best be left in the past :) As a substitute for lemon, I ...


2

I cannot think of any physical reason why this should be so, and I don't believe it Have you tried it? Buy two lemons, nuke one of them, and squeeze them both. Measure the juice that you get from each. Better, have someone else (who isn't aware that the lemons are different in any way) squeeze the lemons and tell you if they thought one was easier to ...


2

To balance acidity, add sugar. It's how most mayonnaise manages to be acidic enough to prevent bacteria growth (pH 4.6 or lower), while still having a balanced and edible flavor. You might get an edible result with honey, but sugar is more of a neutral flavor, so I would use that first. Using a jigger of Dijon mustard is not beyond the pale, as well... ...


2

It sounds like your problem is most likely lack of acid. The acid is what causes possets to thicken. That could happen because the lemons aren't acidic enough (maybe the ones you had the first time were more sour). Re-reading your recipe, I notice that there's a second, simpler potential cause: your recipe simply asks for the juice of 1-2 lemons, and you ...


2

The last time i made lemon chicken it turned out too sour, so i added a bit of baking soda and stirred until the fizz was gone. I tested and added a bit more. It was perfect. Very lemony but not sour. I heard adding too much baking soda can leave a weird taste but i guess i didn't add enough to have that problem. Just my two cents, good luck!



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