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17

I'm culling a lot of information from one of my favorite cocktail books for this one. Yes, limes have a slightly higher acid content (on average) than lemons do - about 6% for limes, compared to 4.5% for lemons. More importantly for their flavor, lemons have about 2% total sugar, while limes have somewhere between 0.5% and 0.75%. Sugar/sweetness has quite ...


13

I agree that there is no true substitute, but if I were going to try, I'd use the zest of 1 lime for every 2 kaffir lime leaves. I wouldn't do the bay leaf or lemon thyme suggested above.


12

I wouldn't attempt to substitute. I've read somewhere that you can use regular lime leaves, but I've never seen those anywhere. Even Googling for lime leaf turns up kaffir lime leaves. They can be found easily enough online: ImportFood.com. They freeze well for months in just a zip-lock bag. The flavor profile is best described as a bright floral aromatic. ...


8

What you have there is simply water seeping out of the gel and bringing some dissolved stuff with it. This is known technically as syneresis. What will help is to add something stabilize the gel. Xanthan gum is probably the easiest thing to use. You can find it at health food stores or Whole Foods because gluten-free bakers use it a lot. Start with 1/8 ...


7

You might be able to counter-balance it with other flavors (salt, sour, sweet, hot), but you're likely still going to have some bitter notes come through, it's just a question if it's tolerable or not, and some people dislike bitter more than others. (I can't understand how people can drink beers other than lambics) In looking at a similar thread on ...


6

The general things to keep in mind are: Don't mix a ton of the hot mixture into the eggs at once. Add a little at a time. Don't use too high heat. It's better to be slow about this than to have scrambled eggs. Don't overheat before you temper the eggs. Go only as far as the recipe says to. If it's too hot, you might be fine if you temper carefully, but ...


6

It seems to me, that a quality planar grater is the best solution. The Spin Zester is way too expensive for a home kitchen. I can recommend this fine micro plane grater for zesting:


5

Besides Xanthan, that Micheal mentioned ... some custard pie fillings will call for use of some sort of a starch (eg, corn starch), which will help prevent the 'weeping' problem, and might be something you already have in your pantry.


4

To prevent this from happening, apart from what Jefromi says, check the temperature with a thermometer. Eggs start coagulating around 60ºC. If you keep the temperature around 55ºC you are pasteurizing the eggs at the same time.


3

Since I assume it is too late to do anything to take the lime away, undermine excess flavor of lime with roasted peppers. They will bear a pleasant complement to the tartness while adding rich, smoky notes. Hotter peppers will further distract from the excess lime. A sweet corn salsa would also add sweetness to anchor the lime.


3

When I need larger amounts of zest, I peel the fruit with a knife as best I can, scrape off the white part, and then use a food processor or finely chop it. This is slower for small amounts, but much faster for large amounts.


3

This isn't a direct answer, but rather an anecdote from personal experience. One time I made garlic parmesan mashed potatoes for a company thanksgiving pot-luck lunch. I've made this recipe a few dozen times before. However, this time I decided to get creative and go with parmesan, asiago, and romano cheeses instead of just parmesan. I also committed the ...


3

About the only thing I can think of us adding a little sugar to the pot, but don't add a lot all at once. Just add a little and taste...


3

There's the option of using Kaffir Lime essential oil - it is the best substitute I know of, much better than the dried Kaffir Lime leaves we can get around here (Israel). It is truly wonderful. Here's the one I use: http://thaifoodessentials.com/buy/ It's quite cheap and lasts for a long time (you only need a few drops per dish). The website also has ...


2

I used to buy curry and kaffir lime leaves at the DeKalb farmer's mkt (Atlanta), but have been told recently that the USDA has banned import in attempt to preempt certain microbes, bacteria, diseases. Dunno what that is really about. In the end, they are no longer available there. However, if you live in a tropical, sub-tropical latitude, you can grow your ...


2

I'd be a little concerned about mixing aluminum foil with acid foods. Aluminum acetate has an astringent taste. I'm not finding it on the internet, but aluminum citrate (from citric acid in the lime juice) likely has a similar flavor. Here's a recent, and seemingly reputable look at cooking acid foods in Aluminum foil (PDF file): Risk Assessment of Using ...


1

Make a liquor; use some whiskey or vodka and add the other ingredients into a well sealed container and freeze for a few weeks. They will dissolve into the alcohol You will probably need to use a very fine strainer to clarify it


1

Not sure whether you will have a bartender or not but as a former Bartender here is how I would approach it. You'll have to experiment in advance for the flavor you are trying to achieve. Since everything you are working with is sharp I would make a ginger simple syrup. 1/2 water 1/2 household sugar and probably about a tablespoon of fresh grated ginger. ...


1

Salt balances with sour flavors really well. There's still an upper limit on how much salt or lime can be considered enjoyable by most people. I'd start with salt, ideally in a marinade, to take advantage of the acidity unless it's already pretty salty. If that approach is taken to its limit and it's still too sour, the only route I see is ...


1

I found them in Wegmans, and I've seen them in a couple of supermarkets - but just in a jar in oil. Similar to a small jar of thai curry paste. Same size, labeling, etc. Not how I expected to find them, so be on the look-out.


1

I bought mine from Amazon.com. I'd found that there are different types of Asian grocery stores, and not all cater to all types of cooking. For instance, Philipino stores don't necessarily carry what a Thai recipe may require. So, even if you were to venture out, (Doug must not have driven in Atlanta) you couldn't assume they'd have what you're looking ...


1

I hope this helps, try chopping up a whole bunch of celery, It seems to absorb the bitter and nutralize the taste, It worked for me when I made a base for rice with way to much menthi Indian spice and the bitterness was unbearable, It worked for me and I hope this helps you to! I also added a little vinagar and sugar.


1

Not a fix, but a footnote - next time only use the zest and not the light-coloured part of the rind - that is where there the bitterness lies.



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