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14

The Maillard reaction can occur at a wide range of temperatures, but the lower limit is not well-defined. It can even occur at room temperature, providing some flavoring components (for example) to ripening cheeses and Seranno ham. At high temperatures (over 150°C or 300°F), it will noticeably occur on many foods in a matter of minutes, so you can actually ...


10

Unless you are prepared to build some industrial strength equipment of your own design and then move everyone in the neighborhood away while you experiment with this, I fear you are taking your life in your hands. Normal pressure cookers add a maximum 15 PSI to achieve a water boiling point of 121 C or 250 F. Autoclaves, used for surgical sterilization, go ...


6

I've added some baking soda (specifically to onions while making French Onion Soup) to accelerate the Maillard reaction in the past and it seems to work rather well. A few more general steps can be taken to encourage this reaction: add protein (egg, milk), reducing sugar (glucose, fructose or lactose), remove water, increase temperature/pH I read ...


5

The Maillard reaction begins around 150° C. You do not need that exact temperature. Usually, you don't even want that exact temperature; even baking temperatures usually hover around 175-200° C (350-400° F), and those temperatures are held for 20 minutes or more. Pan-frying is almost always a fast cooking process lasting no longer than 10 minutes. Thus, ...


3

The meat will pass through various temperature ranges when heated. The moisture in the surface layers of the meat will gradually evaporate, and once they are dried out, the temperature will start to rise more rapidly. I think the balance of caramelization vs. Maillard also has to do with specific proteins and sugars available, but you're right -- around ...


3

In my opinion the Maillard reaction isn't all that essential in Eastern cooking because of the myriad of other strong flavours going on. I don't think I've ever had browned chicken in a Chinese takeout. I always use a method called velveting when cooking chicken for stir fries. Take a couple of egg whites and add a tablespoon of cornstarch and 2 teaspoons ...


2

You need high, direct heat. Option 1 (The practical): Don't think about the candles. Even if you lit enough candles in a pile to get it hot enough- candle soot tastes terrible. Of all the tools listed among your assets only the grill shows potential. Buy some charcoal for it, get it rocket hot, and sear your ribs to perfection. The charcoal will also add a ...


2

As you mention in your comment, 154°C doesn't refer to the pan temperature, it refers to the temperature of the thing being browned, so there's no point in being too precise with your pan temperature, which will decrease a bit anyway when you put the steak in. In any case, 154°C is only when the Maillard reaction starts; it's not like you're trying to ...


1

According to the culinary textbook 'On Cooking' (ISBN 978-0-13-715576-7) page 310, you want a temperature higher than 300°F. Studies have proven that flipping a steak every 30 seconds will have a better effect visually and flavour-wise.


1

I found these slides that may help. The information is a difficult to interpret, but the page with conclusions says that the optimal roast uses the lowest possible temperature for 20 to 30 minutes. This however is information for the food industry and it is clearly geared towards increasing shelf-life which you are probably not too concerned about. If you ...


1

I imagine the argument for almonds roasted at lower temperatures relates to the notion that roasting at higher temperatures would change the chemical structure of the oils and others in the nut. This is a pretty common notion like with cold pressed oils vs. oils that have been heated through its processing. ...


1

Use a piece of butter. When it has just started browning, pour it out (before it can smoke), and the pan is now hot enough to brown other things. Allow an extra minute or two for the pan to get hotter, so it's well above the Maillard temperature after losing heat to your meat. Or, just do what most people do, and let an EMPTY cast-iron pan get insanely ...


1

Vecta's answer points to the key as I see it to ensure Maillard reactions: reduce water. Since Maillard reactions require higher temperatures than is possible in the presence of water (over boiling point) it may be the soy sauce that's causing some of your problems. Have you considered eliminating the soy sauce from your marinade and then adding it later? ...


1

I use the exact same process that you have described. Without resorting to Vecta's approach of increasing the pH, the only thing I can think of is to bump up your heat. Short of buying a professional wok burner (which would likely require expensive ventilation upgrades for use indoors), Alton Brown recommends using an inexpensive turkey fryer burner ...



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