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35

Technique Always use a cutting surface made for a knife, particularly a wooden chopping board/block. Avoid contact with hard surfaces such as metal, glass, or stone; these will quickly cause dulling or even chipping of most knives. Also avoid cutting frozen items, for the same reason. Use the dull end ("top") of the knife for scraping food off surfaces, or ...


31

Kosher salt and a small amount of vegetable oil. Scrub the pan with the salt on a rag or paper towel, if there are stubborn bits mix a couple drops of oil with the salt, wipe dry with clean towel. If you use a wet method to clean the pan re-heat it after cleaning to make sure it is completely dry before storing.


24

You should use both. Knives have a very thin ragged edge (the burr) that is too small to see, which gets pushed over from use, and which makes the knife seem dull. A honing steel straightens this burr out. I use a honing steel before I cook every day. Over time, the burr wears down, or can no longer be straightened. At this point, you will need to use the ...


22

Ideally it should be matte to just-slightly-shiny black and very smooth. This article has some terrific information on the ideal oil to use (flaxseed) and method for seasoning, with actual scientific grounding.


20

Besides what @Janelle said, for really stuck on stuff, use a similar process as you'd use to deglaze the pan -- While the pan's still hot (or heat it back up if you've let it cool), and then add some cold water. Some should instantly steam, and should hopefully be hot enough to boil a little. (don't add so much water that you cool down the pan). Scrape ...


20

"Better" might be a matter of interpretation. The oils will behave a bit differently, however. Mineral Oil is a non-drying oil, which means that it will not polymerize (form a plastic-like substance) over time. This is good for oiling cutting boards because it will stay a bit liquid in the wood and flow into cracks and scratches. It is also food-safe and ...


19

Ceramic blades can only be sharpened against something that is harder than it is. I would recommend sending it back to the manufacturer for sharpening if needed. Typically it is done using a very hard abrasive wheel because of the risk of the blade breaking, you do not want to do this without proper safety equipment.


13

I'm still happily using a non-stick frying pan that I've had for almost 4 years. I only use Teflon utensils. I never use harsh abrasives. After cooking, I fill it with boiling water, let it soak for a while and then wipe out with paper towels. Most of the time I just give it a quick rinse and it's ready for the next time. And buy quality - "Quality is ...


13

Another alternative is to go to an East Asian grocery and pick up a wok cleaner, which looks like a tiny little broom made of stiff sticks. It does more-or-less the same thing as the coarse salt. I find it particularly useful for cast iron grill pans, as it's easier to get leverage on burnt-on material than when using salt. It'll cost you maybe two dollars ...


12

Always use a soft cutting surface like a wooden board or a plastic cutting board. Avoid glass cutting boards. Always clean them after using them.


10

Well your chef's knife should constitute about 90% of your usage I'd say. It should be used for slicing, dicing just about anything. Your paring knife is actually the 3-4" one you describe. Paring knives are typically used for delicate tasks like, coring apples, peeling, and some people use it for mincing garlic because it's so small. I've never seen a 2" ...


9

That is just the seasoning - the nonstick carbon that is formed after years of use - coming off. If big pieces are dropping in your food or you are freaked out by it, simply give your pan a good scrubbing with some steel wool and soap then re-season it. To season the pan: Take a paper towel and soak a bit of oil into it Coat the inside of the pan with oil ...


9

Here are a few rules I follow with my own knives. Don't put your knives in the dishwasher. Hand wash and dry immediately after use. Store knives where they won't be banging up against other hard things: my favorite is in a wooden knife block. If you must store your knives in a drawer, protect the edge. You can use a commercial solution like this guy, or ...


9

A stone is the hardest way to sharpen a knife. If you don't get the angle exactly right, you'll just be messing up your knife, not sharpening it. If you do want to go that way, yes, you'd definitely want to practice on something cheaper, because it's likely you will mess it up. This is why a lot of people just take their expensive knives to a professional to ...


8

I've never heard of milk being used to season a pan and so I am a little skeptical of it. Pan seasoning is always done with fat that is heated until it polymerizes. This creates a very hard non-stick surface that makes cooking easier and protects the pan from rust. See this question for more about how to season your pan: What's the best way to season ...


8

These are just mineral (calcium) stains from your water source. They will not affect the stainless steel. The quickest way to clean stainless steel from burnt on oil, food, and water stains is to use a polyprop/ester scouring pad (e.g. 3M's branded as Scotch-Brite). Use a little liquid dish wash soap, a poly scourer pad, and a generous serve of elbow ...


7

We use tap water + a cheap plastic-bristled kitchen scrub brush to get all of the food bits off. Then put it on medium heat on the stove until it's dry. The heat will sterilize for you. Why medium heat? Someone told me it's better for the pan than using high heat. It sounds logical but I have absolutely no real proof.


7

It should be fine to use. It is probably dusty, perhaps greasy from other kitchen sources. If it's self cleaning, go for it (and avoid using any harsh cleaners) It might get smoky at first, so you should have ventilation possible (window, fan, or whatever) If not self cleaning, give it a good wiping-out with an ammonia based cleaner or use commercial oven ...


6

Toxic? Neither the seasoning (which is essentially polymerized fat) nor the rust (which is... rust) is harmful in small quantities. Of course, I would not eat either by the spoonful. Spray oil as seasoning fat? See the many questions on seasoning, but cooking spray is far from ideal as a seasoning fat, as it contains emulsifiers and such, and tends to be ...


5

One of the very best investments I've ever made in a kitchen tool is this Chefs Choice knife sharpener. It is motorized and has three levels of wheel - one for grinding out really bad knicks, one for sort of once-a-month resharpening and one for everyday honing that will leave your blade razor sharp. The angle guides make it nearly impossible to use wrong. ...


5

Don't ever leave your knives wet, keep a towel handy and dry the blade regularly while working, especially after slicing acid foods such as tomatoe, citrus, etc. Hand wash your knives and don't set them down until they have been dried. Purchase a fine (as opposed to coarse) steel and learn how to use it, half dozen licks every once in a while on a well kept ...


5

While ceramic knives will stay sharp for quite awhile, there is no such thing as "never needs sharpening". In our knife shop we use a diamond system that we developed to bring these knives back to their original sharpness. (or sometimes sharper!) One could try one of the diamond block type, sharpeners on the market but the ceramics are difficult to get the ...


5

I worked with a 60+ year old chef who had been using the same knife since he started his apprenticeship at age 15 (no exaggeration). Over the decades he had worn away at least 1cm of blade width by sharpening and honing but it was still completely functional.


5

Michael's answer is fabulous, but one other note: as long as the seasoning works and achieves the desired effect, it is good seasoning. I have a variety of shapes/sizes of cast iron that I love, and few of them have the delightful smooth seasoning that it is POSSIBLE to get. I have seasoned pans with a variety of oils, both n the range and in the oven. The ...


5

I don't do anything for my peels. I only wash them if they get sauce on them, and then only with hot water and a gentle sponging. Never soak them with water. If you want to add a bit of water resistance, you could use some cutting board oil (a.k.a. mineral oil) to add some protection.


5

It won't suffer much from having a millimeter or two of material removed in one area, so I'd just go ahead with the Dremel and grind it down to clean stone rather than resorting to chemicals that may or may not work and may or may not impregnate the stone. There's no substance made short of diamonds that can resist a grinding wheel. Worst case is you end ...


4

I have a lot of canned food and have gone through my share of can openers. I'm generally OK with a rusty can opener, but I don't like the rust flakes getting into my food. I can't bear that metallic taste. While I don't mind buying a new can opener (they sell them at the dollar general for two dollars), but I find it a bit wasteful. This may sound a bit ...


4

There's a difference between sharpening and honing your knifes. If your knives need sharpening, you should take it to a professional. After a few years of moderate use, it's probably time. Michael has a good suggestion, but only if you plan on sharpening your knives often enough to make it worth it. For regular maintenance, you want to use a honing steel on ...


4

Get them professionally sharpened regularly, there is no substitute for that. Hone them every time before you use them, don't cut on a hard surface (such as a marble or the like) Some knives like the Wusthof knives I have will lose their sharpness quite quickly other's like Global are meant to keep it for a bit longer, so different knives mean different ...



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