Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

Actually, it's a popular misconception that brining works because of osmosis. If it was really osmosis at work, plain water would work better than salted water. Kenji over at The Food Lab went into this a few months ago: http://www.seriouseats.com/2012/11/the-food-lab-the-truth-about-brining-turkey-thanksgiving.html Here's the relevant bit: To ...


12

I can't see any reason for the marinating itself to make any difference. If it's safe to leave the (un-marinated) meat in the same conditions for the same length of time, then it's safe to marinate it for that long. Five days in the refrigerator is definitely stretching it for chicken - usually no more than a few days is recommended, and that's assuming it ...


11

Yes, the problem will be the vinegar. Vinegar is acidic and you'll end up with mushy meat. 48 hours is almost certainly too long. For a vinegar base, I try not to push it over 8 hours and that's only if really necessary. A few hours is typically fine. Right now, you've got to consider how to save the meat. I'd freeze the meat right now. Freeze the meat ...


10

A lot of cheeses are naturally brined (feta, for example), and marinating cheese is not much different. For the best effect: Pick a porous cheese Cut off the edges if the cheese has a skin Cut into smaller pieces to increase the penetration Press it dry with towels (or paper towels) You can inject the cheese to get more flavour in it Marinate in flavours ...


10

Soy sauce, sake or mirin and sugar are the usual ingredients in a teriyaki sauce. The rice wines in particular are vital for an authentic teriyaki flavour. So the question is somewhat moot: onions aren't usually found in teriyaki sauce anyway. The onions naturally add flavour to your marinade: if you like it, leave them in, if you don't, take them out. The ...


10

Soaking chicken in milk or buttermilk in the refrigerator overnight is a common practice when making Southern-style fried chicken. This practice supposedly tenderizes the chicken through the actions of enzymes naturally present in the milk. Yoghurt is used in a similar way in many Middle Eastern and southern Asian food ways. The milk can be used alone, ...


10

Yes, it is perfectly safe (as long as you continue to thaw the meat in a safe manner, as in the refrigerator). The marinade will not begin to have much effect until at least the outer layers of the meat are thawed, but it will not otherwise have any side effect. It may get slightly better penetration due to the changes in the texture of the meat from ice ...


10

If it's the same marinade you marinated the chicken in, I would be very careful. If it's not cooked to a high enough temperature, it is not safe to eat, as it has been in contact with raw chicken. It would probably be safe, but I would just mix up a new similar batch and use that to finish off the chicken. It's not worth risking salmonella to save the cost ...


9

One doesn't generally marinate baked chicken wings because that runs counter to the goal of getting them crispy. I know that a lot of recipes tell you to do it, but while those recipes might result in good flavour, they'll also result in a pretty awful texture. Wings need to be baked with as little moisture as possible so they don't get soggy, and then ...


9

It'll be fine. I've done this multiple times, even occasionally for more than 1 night and never had a problem, if anything it improves things as the marinade has time to work into the meat. If you can, give it a stir a coupe of times (every 6 hours maybe?) to ensure even coating. The acids in orange juice and most (?) marinades are generally too weak ...


9

Five refrigerated days is pushing well past the recommended boundaries--MeatSafety.org and FoodSafety.gov both recommend no more than 1-2 days. The marinade would make no significant difference in the overall shelf life of the chicken. This applies even to acid or enzyme based marinades since the concentration and application is not uniformly controlled.


8

Two things- If the marinade is very strong or salty then the meat could simply become over flavored. If the marinade includes a meat digesting enzyme such as papain then leaving it too long could turn the meat to mush.


8

There are several reasons why you should marinate before cooking: Many marinades contain raw ingredients that should be cooked along with the food being marinated, such as garlic or ginger. In some cases this may actually be a health hazard (raw garlic can harbor botulism), in other cases you'll simply end up with an undesirable pungent flavour. Many ...


8

You can absolutely freeze marinated meat - defrost in the refrigerator, and it will continue to marinate as it defrosts. I find that it usually takes about a day to defrost chicken breasts in the fridge. The meat is more of a concern than the type of marinade when it comes to freezing. Most marinades should be fine to freeze. However, if you're starting off ...


7

You need to 1) increase the emulsification, and 2) reduce the amount of time the sauce is very hot. You can try adding honey or mustard to the sauce, that will improve emulsification. You can also hit it with a stick blender which will do a much better job of breaking it up than can be done by hand. Also it may look ok after a few hours but who knows how ...


7

Don't worry about the pork contaminating the chicken, but rather vice versa. A good rule of thumb with chicken is to treat it as a biohazardius contaminant. Because it is. Salmonella is present IN chicken meat, unlike other meats where you will only find microbes on the surface. Your marinade doesn't seem particularly inhospitable to pathogen growth, so ...


7

Hardly a queer question. We marinate in acidic liquids because it tastes good, really. As Alton Brown said in the Good Eats episode, "Raising The Steaks": "Acid doesn't tenderize meat nearly as well as enzymes. But acids can help you tenderize your own food. That's because acids taste tangy, and tangy tastes tell our saliva glands to do their stuff, and ...


7

Soy sauce is pretty salty. It sounds like a great deal of water diffused out of your chicken and into the marinade, which significantly changed the texture of the meat. It's not uncommon to do something like this on purpose. When you make gravlax, for example, you cover a piece of salmon with quite a bit of salt and refrigerate it for a day or two. The salt ...


6

While health concerns for storing meat are very real, in the scope of this question it's actually not an issue. No amount of time you are going to marinate something that will yield a good result is going to pose a health hazard unless your meat is near expiration to begin with. Consider the following: For most marinades, you will get very little ...


6

Marinating your meat makes it safer primarily by introducing it to salt, which kills bacteria. It is possible to make jerky safely without it, though you need to be careful. You should use lean meat; fat is the most likely component in the meat to go bad. It's also important to regulate the temperature closely and make sure hold the meat at temperature for ...


6

This would be a bad idea. Chicken should be cooked 1-2 days after refrigeration according to the USDA and other food safety agencies, and will tend to get noticeably slimy and pungent after 3-4 days in my experience. 5 days is really pushing it. I understand the rationale for the question - lemon juice can kill the surface bacteria - but that's just the ...


6

Any vinegar or lemon juice or any other acid it there for those two reasons. To soften the meat and to impart flavor.


6

That release of moisture is due to breakage of chicken's cell structure, and further moisturing will not repair it - so it's not about the pores, and there's no "going back" from that state. Still, if You cook Your chicken in a liquid with agents that affect osmotic pressure (salt, for example), it will lead to release of liquid through membranes, and ...


6

The main factors a base liquid can contribute to a marinade are: Bulk -- enough volume to reach all of the food. Acidity -- helps tenderize the surface of meats, and provides a bright flavor balance Sweetness -- helps provide a flavor balance Viscosity -- helps the marinade stick to or coat the target food Enzymatic activity -- some liquids (such as ...


6

Brining and marination do two different things, contrary to popular belief. Brines allow salt (plus possibly a very few other small flavor molecules) to penetrate into meat, at a rate of about 2-2.5 CM per 24 hours. These deeply season your meat, change its texture, and help allow it to retain moisture when being cooked. Marinades are a surface treatment, ...


6

Pineapple contains Bromelain, which is "one of the most popular proteases to use for meat tenderizing." Since it's sold as a meat tenderizer, I'd say it really just depends on how long you marinate with it -- it's possible to over-tenderize something. This warns about over marinating, and mentions recommended times: The same process that tenderizes ...


5

Yes, it's oxidation, so yes, oil will stop it happening. However, broiling the potatoes straight from the oil will not yield very good results. You are much better off par-boiling them for 3 or 4 minutes, draining them, leaving them to steam and dry out for a few minutes, then coating them in oil and seasoning, and baking them for 30-45 mins. This will yield ...


5

I think just about any large flaky-fleshed fish that's not too fatty is a good candidate for ceviche. Salmon can work, though it's a tad fatty. Tuna is not a good choice, in my opinion. Cod and any kind of bass can work really well. I would think haddock or even sole or flounder could work too. There is lots of white-fleshed fish available in the North ...


5

As long as your normal marinating time isn't significantly less than the defrosting time, then I believe that'll work fine. If the normal marinating time is much smaller, then you'll end up over-marinating your meat; if the marinade is acidic that would produce undesirable results. If it's the same or longer, then you'll be marinating for the right amount of ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible