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15

Since you specified not wanting any equipment other than a campfire and a stick, the best I can do is add one more piece of equipment you should be able to find anywhere (i.e., not have to carry with you): a rock. If you put a flat-topped rock just to the edge of your campfire, you should be able to place a graham cracker and slab of chocolate on top of it. ...


14

Marshmallows expand so much because the water in them becomes steam, and gas takes up a LOT more volume than liquid. Specifically, 1 mL of water becomes ~1.36 LITERS of vapor, before it gets heated further. That's 1000-fold expansion, before you add additional expansion as the gas is heated. Marshmallows don't have all that much water content, but when ...


12

If you can, just get better marshmallow skewers/forks. If there are two prongs on the end, the marshmallow can't rotate. (And as long as you're not holding it at a really steep angle, they'll have a hard time sliding off the end too.) You can get fancy ones with nice handles, but just plain metal is fine. And it doesn't have to be super strong, so you can ...


11

I was recently on a canoe trip. We ran out of chocolate for the s'mores a couple nights before the end, so we substituted Nutella. No need to worry about melting, just spread it on the graham cracker. The resulting s'mores are much messier, though, since it all tends to squeeze out between the crackers. Overall, we judged it enough of a success that ...


9

Are you using a metal skewer? Metal will carry heat much more than other materials such as wood, and will cause the inside of the marshmallow where it is skewered to soften and slide under the weight of the rest of the marshmallow. If you're aiming for a golden brown crust, then the key is to cook it quickly at just the right distance away so that the ...


6

Sterno is (roughly) alcohol mixed with gel. The same type of alcohol (ethanol mixed with enough methanol to make it poisonous) is commonly used in marine stoves because it's considered to be quite safe: it doesn't explode and it can be extinguished with water. Alcohol also burns cleanly and quite completely, so there are essentially no methanol molecules ...


4

Have you tried using a marshmallow recipe that is only made from gelatin and cooked sugar syrup (sugar, water, and light corn syrup to soft ball stage, 240 degrees F)? I have made various piped marshmallows that will hold swirly shapes using this type of marshmallow recipe. It is a bit more stable than the egg based recipes. The most important thing is to ...


4

Kraft's Jet-Puffed brand claims the following conversion factor: 1 Regular Marshmallow = 13 Mini Marshmallows That puts you at around 156 Mini Marshmallows for 12 Regulars.


4

I don't think I've ever seen a marshmallow recipe without corn syrup, except maybe for methocel marshmallows. But assuming these are standard gelatin marshmallows, you can dredge them in confectioner's sugar and that will make them easier to work with. Don't "dust" them, actually dredge them, otherwise you'll just end up with globs of wet sugar attached to ...


4

I'm gonna guess you just didn't go long enough. I make my own in the food processor all the time, but I turn it on high, go have a snack and come back in 10 minutes. It certainly does take quite some time.


4

There are two tricks that I know of: Stuff the chocolate in the middle of the marshmallow. More time in the fire will help it get melty. Roast your marshmallow long and slow so it's hot all the way through. It should practically fall off the stick. The hotter the marshmallow is, the more heat it can transfer to your chocolate. Let the whole s'more sit ...


3

Sterno suggests this use in multiple ways. On their site they have a pdf recipe for smores "indoors" that instructs you to roast the marshmallows over a can of Sterno. They also manufacture a Smores-n-more set that is really just a ceramic pot with a grill that you place a can of Sterno in to keep people from getting too close to the open flame. My guess is ...


3

The vast majority of recipes I find call for marshmallows to be added at the last second, and cooked only long enough for them to melt. Usually then a heavy frosting is added to top the whole thing, giving the illusion of marshmallow inside the brownie. Find an example here. I've also seen really "wet" brownies with lots of included chocolate chips and ...


3

Store-bought marshmallows (and most homemade marshmallows) are gelatin-based, which means they'll melt above 40° C. No chance of surviving a bake. I have, on occasion, seen "rocky road" type brownies with actual marshmallows and I suspect that they are either not conventional brownies or not conventional marshmallows. You could probably create a ...


2

The easy way: Use raspberry oil (preferably) or a raspberry extract in place of the peppermint oil. The (probably) much better way: Leave out the oil and food coloring and use raspberry puree as you suggested. Strain frozen or fresh raspberries through a fine strainer or cheese cloth. Weigh the resulting juice/puree and then put it on the stove an cook it ...


2

This nutrition data says that: 1 cup of miniature marshmallows weighs 50 grams, 10 miniature marshmallows weigh 7 grams, and 1 regular marshmallow weighs 7 grams 1:10 is a bit different from Sam Ley's answer; maybe Kraft is a little off average or this data is a little off. In any case, it's helpful in that it'd let you measure: 12 large ("regular") ...


2

There are 2 types of Sternos out there. There IS a type that burns something harmful for open-flame-to-food cooking. I believe it's an older way of making them though and that Sterno just makes the "safe" ones today. Just wanted to put this out there though. I own a Sterno can that is probably over 7 years old and it says to not eat food that touches the ...


2

Microwave the chocolate first in a microwaveable bowl, then heat the 'mellows and the crackers, before putting it all together. It's what I call "indoor s'mores".


2

I think you're taking an overly complicated approach to this, I've had great success with a recipe from the DIY Cookbook from ATK, in their version, they use: confectioners’ sugar, cornstarch, unflavored gelatin, corn syrup (not high fructose), granulated sugar, salt, vanilla extract The only non-vegan ingredient in this manifestation is the gelatin, ...


1

To replace the high fructose corn syrup, another syrup could be substituted without having adverse effects. I would recommend a agave syrup as it is functionally and flavorfully very close to HFCS. Fructose levels in agave syrup can vary from around 50% (very close to HFCS) up to 90% (which would be sweeter but functionally similar). You could also make an ...


1

The number of available thickeners is very large. Some work for high temperatures, others for low temperatures. For your filling I would use Iota Carageenan (Its used for thickening in many commercial ice cream products). It might be a bit difficult to find. Your second choice would be Xantham Gum. When using these thickeners be sure to hydrate correctly ...


1

Roast the marshmallow on a stick. Assemble the S'more(s). Put some foil on a rock by the fire and let them melt a bit longer.


1

It's exactly your deviation which caused the problem. Stiff meringue weeps - the foam slowly loses the egg white moisture. When you mix cornstarch in it, the cornstarch absorbs the water droplets before they have the chance to make a big wet spot. So if you use the marshmallow mix, you won't have this problem. As for crystallization, I am not sure that ...


1

I have tried adding marshmallows into my brownies, but ive learned that putting the bigger ones on top then drizzling with more brownie mix is the way to go. The marshmallows become gooey and melt on the top and into the batter. They dont burn up and get nasty.



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