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6

They are completely different. Clotted cream, also called Devonshire cream, is made by heating unpasteurized milk until a layer of cream forms on the surface. The mixture is then cooled, and the cream skimmed off. It has a butterfat content between 55 percent and 63 percent. Unlike creme fraiche it is not a cultured milk product, and is typically eaten as a ...


5

Your end result if you follow that recipe would weigh approximately 22 ounces, or 1 pound 6 ounces, or 1.375 pounds. (There are 16 ounces in a pound. Fluid ounce and ounce as a unit of weight are not exactly the same thing, but pretty darn close considering the ingredients you are working with, there are 8 fluid ounces in an American "cup", a "fluid ounce" ...


4

You can add Mascapone Cheese to a plain italian tomato sauce. The sauce can take on quite a different feel to it from the normal pasta sauce which can make a nice change.


4

Cheese is a cultured product, so you should follow the advice in the question: How do you know when a cultured item is no longer safe to consume? Since it's been acidified and (if it's store bought) probably also pasteurized, it's very unlikely that any harmful bacteria would be able to compete with the "good" bacteria. Most cheese never go bad in this way ...


3

Here are some fairly complete, although fairly long, instructions for making homemade Marscapone. Any cream cheese (such as Philadelphia) could make a reasonable substitute, with extra cream added if necessary.


3

Yes, you can. You'll require heavy cream, an acid (vinegar or tartaric acid), au bain marie technique and patience and a refridgerator. Check out preparation here.


2

This is a recipe for a quick "tiramis├╣". It can be used to serve cookies, or fruits. It requires mascarpone cheese, 2 eggs, and cocoa powder (optional). Whip the egg white. Incorporate the mascarpone cheese into the yoke and mix. Incorporate the egg white, and mix. Add cocoa powder. Leave in refrigerator before to use it.


2

Mascarpone will substitute for cream cheese in most respects (except, as Elendil mentioned, the precise taste), however it will not entirely bear the same structural qualities and may lead to your cookie spreading out a bit more than the cream cheese would have (in the same way that applesauce can do the same when substituted for a fat). The varieties ...


2

Yes, that should be fine, but bear in mind that cream cheese has a sharper, subtle cheese taste whereas mascarpone is more or less triple cream, and thus milder. If you want that sharp taste, perhaps add just a little lemon juice with your mascarpone.


1

You probably wont be able to get that exact result with a pastry bag because the almost perfect square grid they are divided into. I still think a pastry bag will be your best bet. I am not sure were you got that picture but my guess is that the tiramisu was machine made and the marks and peaks are from the tooling that was made for the machine to deliver ...


1

Mascarpone works well for making a sauce. I've found it combines nicely with sweet chilli dipping sauce. It is also eminently suitable as a filling for a chicken kiev style dish.


1

It should work well as a sauce. You can also use it to make a sweet sauce, as it has just the right balance of fat and flavour for dessert. Mix it with peaches or blackberries, along with a reduction of some of their juice. Will go well on a cheesecake or tart, or as a more refreshing replacement for custard on a crumble.


1

Yes, it will melt similarly to cream cheese and can be used in sauces, or to enrich either polenta or risotto.



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