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22

Is it more accurate? ABSOLUTELY Does it mean that you can still follow a recipe by weight exactly and expect perfect results everytime? No You're right in that humidity will vary the weight, but if you're consistently working in the same area with a small change in humidity - its not something to worry about. You'll adjust your recipe once and then ...


21

It can range on the size of the lemon and the time of year. A medium lemon will give 2-3 Tablespoons of juice, where a larger lemon can give 1/4 cup (4 Tablespoons). Just have to decide on much lemon flavor you want in your recipe as to which number you pick.


20

"1 cup of chopped nuts" is measured after chopping. "1 cup of nuts, chopped" is measured before chopping.


20

Much more often, expert chefs will use an accurate digital scale, particularly for baking. Cups are OK for liquids, and most people use spoons for small measurments like salt or yeast, but scales are accurate for everything from flour, to honey, to water, to softened butter. Plus, since you can generally tare scales, you don't have to wash anything out but ...


15

I suggest to measure by weight as you'll never go wrong. Otherwise, I use your second method which is to scoop then use a knifed to rid of excess flour. Flour is so fluffy and needs to be compacted (somewhat) to get a true cup, therefore measuring by weight always guarantees the same amount of flour.


14

In this Gordon Ramsey scrambled eggs video he uses a "knob" of butter. It appears to be about 2 Tbsp. I don't think it's intended to be a specific term. You'd never see "knob" used for baking, where exact amounts matter. When cooking, recipes tend to be a general guideline rather than a strict set of instructions.


14

Yes they do; mostly for baking and pastries where precision is more important. For other types of cooking, precision is not that important. Experience play a role when knowing the quantity needed for a recipe. Also, most of the time, we see chefs (on TV or in real cuisine) handling small containers of prepared ingredients, and those are measured when they ...


13

Common U.S. Volume Measurements: 1 tbsp = 3 tsp 1 fl oz = 2 tbsp 1 cup = 8 oz 1 pint = 2 cups 1 quart = 4 cups 1 gallon = 4 quarts Common U.S. to Metric Conversions: 1 oz ~ 30 mL 1 cup ~ 237 mL 1 quart ~ 1 L 1 oz = 28.4 g 1 lbs = 0.45 kg Common Metric to U.S. Conversions: 1 kg = 2.2 lbs Online Converters: Google: Type a conversion such as "1 ...


13

I've always been taught that baking is a science when it is compared to cooking. Cooking is very much 'to taste' and very individual. There are not as many things that can go wrong with a standard recipe in cooking, and you have a lot more room for creativity. You don't have to look at baking as that precise. However, unlike cooking, where you can add or ...


13

How about Ruhlman's book, Ratio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking? The entire work is dedicated to breaking cooking down into ratios, and it includes recipes. I hear the bread recipe is particularly good.


12

The real answer is that it depends on the measurement methodology used by the person who wrote the recipe. I have one book that actually calls for measuring by scooping with the measuring cup and scraping it with the side of the bag, which is how the average person tends to measure flour, and results in about 30% more flour by weight per cup. King Arthur ...


12

Realistically, there's a lot of flexibility in baking, in spite of the cargo cult mantra that you have to follow pastry recipes exactly. There are simple, weight-based ratios that can be used as a foundation for plenty of variation. The "round numbers" are, in fact, approximations, and this is often why you'll see that a typical baked good recipe in a ...


11

Maybe! Flour is unusually variable in how densely it will settle, so this can make a big difference for some recipes. The purpose of sifting is to make the amount of flour in a given volume reliable. (If you are measuring by weight, you don't need to sift.) By moving around the sifted flour, or pouring it from one container into another, you are changing ...


11

I would do it the other way round, I'd fry the sausages first, then add the veg. This has a few benefits as I see it:- The sausages will brown more evenly, purely aesthetic but some people will think they are not cooked if they are not brown. You'll get the oil out of the sausages so you'll have a better idea of how much oil to add when you add the veg, ...


11

After searching different places, I could not find a clear answer. I therefor decided to measure it myselfe. I bought a bunch of normal sized lemons, and squeezed them. On average, the lemons I bought yelded 55ml, thats 3,67 tablespoons of juice per lemon.


11

Use something that will help you measure the dough or mix uniformly. Some possible tools to co-opt for this task: Ice cream scoop, melon baller, measuring cups or spoons : all depending on size of course. You should be able to get to where you can eyeball the size in relation to the tool you are using.


11

Assuming you're talking about USA usage, you're correct, a "cup" is usually 6oz. In the USA, the standard size for a "cup" of coffee is 6oz, even though nobody drinks cups of coffee that small (12oz to 20oz is more common). For that matter, the size of a "cup" of tea can be 5oz or 6oz when the number of "cups" a teapot holds is listed; a "6 cup" teapot is ...


10

This site will convert weights to volumes, and says that you should use .53 of a US cup.


10

Litmus paper is quite inexpensive. Edmund Scientific has 100 strips for US$1.95.


10

Volume measurements of herbs are hopelessly imprecise to begin with; what you actually measure as 1/4 cup depends entirely on how tightly you pack them, how wet the leaves are, even the size/shape of your measuring cup or spoon. When given a measurement like that, you should always treat it as a rough guideline; don't worry about being exact, it's not ...


10

It's actually understandable why this would be confusing to non-Americans, because the terms "teaspoon" and "tablespoon" actually have two meanings - one in cooking and one in dining. Historically, teaspoons and tablespoons were simply two types of silverware. Teaspoons were literally for stirring tea or other liquids. Tablespoons were used for serving. ...


10

A 'pinch' is the amount of powder/whatever that can be trapped between one's thumb and fore finger.


10

According to the Kitchen Companion, a terrific general handbook which I recommend, 1 lb (about 2 cups) of dried beans is roughly 6 to 7 cups cooked beans, and one 15oz can of cooked beans is roughly 1.75 cups drained, making it equivalent to 1/4 to 1/3 lbs ( or 1/2 to 3/4 cup) dried. Per my personal experience, dried beans increase in volume from 2.5X at ...


10

One tablespoon is three teaspoons, so no, it can't be considered half a tablespoon because it's one-third instead :) You can use three teaspoons to measure out one tablespoon, but it might be tricky to measure the other way: as Rumstacio said below, the 1/3 is by volume, and it can be difficult to eyeball the volume of a semi-sphere (1.3 the height of the ...


10

This depends on the time you need to bring it to boil (water evaporates long before it starts boiling), the surface area of the water, and your definition of "negligible". Best test it with your own kettle. My kettle needed 2.5 minutes for boiling it, and lost 11 g out of 560, not quite half an ounce. It will probably lose some more while cooling. If you ...


10

There is no single answer to that question: it is going to vary program by program. Some shows, like America's Test Kitchen, are going to be quite precise--at at least, they will intend to be. Other shows, not naming any names, less so. The thing is, with very very few exceptions, you should not be cooking to time anyway. The time in a recipe is just a ...


9

I'd say it depends on the recipe. "1 cup chopped pecans" I would chop and then measure. If it calls for 1 cup of pecans and then chops them as a step in the recipe, measure first and chop second. In most cases, I would assume it means after chopping.


9

Although I've come to find a lot of uses for my kitchen scale, the ones that immediately pop into mind are: Exact measurements. When a recipe calls for a cup of baby spinach, for example, that's going to be hard to measure. Not going to be a problem if you're dealing with weights. This is extremely important with baking, where exact measurements are ...


9

Another option is to get one of the plunger type measuring cups. Once you push out the ingredient, you can use a spatula or spoon to scrape the end of the spatula. This works great for honey, molasses, syrup etc. http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/kitchen/b78b/?cpg=froogle


9

The easiest way to measure a cup of flour is of course to take the measuring cup, plunge it into your bag of flour and just lift up a spoonful. The problem with that is that the plunging and lifting will compress the flour inside the cup and actually get you more flour than you wanted. If you spoon the flour into the measuring cup you minimize the ...



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