New answers tagged

1

So, here's is what I did: I did calculate the volume of the cake pan I wanted to use (37 x 5 cm) and the one the recipe calls for (23 x 4 cm), thanks to @Stephie's answer. From the ratio, I figured how much batter is needed to fill the 37 cm cake pan. As for the baking of the large cake, I did take @Joe's advice, used an old towel and a tin can opened from ...


1

You are asking about weight. A cake pretty much weighs the same as the sum of its ingredients (maybe some slightly evaporation from the buttermilk). There are plenty of free cup to gram converters on the internet, just use one of those to get an idea how close you are to your 4 kg goal. An egg weighs about 60 - 80 g, but it depends on the size.


3

It is a question of scaling. In chat you told us the given recipe was for a 23 cm pan. I'll ignore height for now, assuming the same height for all pan sizes, because that can be adjusted in a second step. The math: The cake batter for round cakes fills a cylinder. The volume of which is base circle area x height, ignore height as stated above. The ...


2

An experienced cake baker friend of mine suggests one egg per five guests when making sponge wedding cakes like chocolate or vanilla (not traditional Buritsh fruit cakes, which is the norm where I come from) I'm in the same boat, of cooking my first wedding cake for 150 guests, and I'll be making a 30-egg cake on that basis.


3

It's referring to the weight of each piece after cooking. 1 lb of uncooked chicken is 453.59 grams. Some use 450g as a quick rule as 4 grams is really not much in most applications. 450g divided by 2 would make each piece 225g raw. Cooked chicken generally loses 30% of its weight, so cooked is 70%, or .7 of the raw weight. 225g X .7 = 157.5g , which when ...



Top 50 recent answers are included