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100% marketing When the packaged weight serves no normal recipe use, or is not a round number e.g. 1 Kg When the price end in .99 or .95 You are a victim of marketing Avoid these if you can, or just smile and carry on


3

The one thing that's not been mentioned: the size of the package needs to be something easily shipped. A standard pallet in the U.S. is 48" by 40" (not sure about Europe, but I'm sure they have a similar standard). While boxes can overhang the 40" side a bit, it shouldn't be by more than a few inches, and they certainly shouldn't overhang the 48" side, or ...


31

Quite often, it's because a manufacturer prefers to decrease the size of a packet than to increase its price. Customers notice when the price goes up but don't tend to notice the product getting smaller. For example, jam in the UK used to be sold in jars containing one pound, which became the equivalent 454 grams with metrication. But, more recently, ...


27

While 127 is a weird number, 227 isn't - it's the grams equivalent of half a pound. In most cases where something is a weird (nonround) size in metric measurements, it's 10 fluid ounces or a quarter of a pound or something else reasonable in imperial units. Why so many 454g packages instead of 500? So the same machine can be used to make 1 lb packages (just ...


1

This will not be a direct answer to your question, but bear with me. When a producer is choosing their packaging, they have several options. They can portion by weight or volume (or amount, but that's useful less often for produce). They can then choose whatever serving "size" they want; producers of new products may have to determine sizes by themselves, ...



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