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3

Of course you can freeze meat. If it would be unsafe, your local supermarked wouldn't be allowed to sell it. What you have to keep in mind when freezing your own meat: Storage time is limited, for guidelines see here or here. Freezing does nor remove bacteria, mold and other "nasties", but stops them from multiplying. Rule of thumb: What's on the meat ...


0

In my experience, yes, it does. I live in Mexico, we have good quality meat in the north, but not so much in the centre and south. So I put a piece of lesser quality beef tenderloin in raw milk, just enough to cover it (not pasteurized). I keep it for 3 days in the fridge at 34-36 F (1-2 Celsius). After that time, I use tap water to rinse all the milk. ...


1

For every pound of ground meat (even lean ground beef) I use 1 Tablespoon of ground flax seed-(flax seed meal available now in most grocery stores.


2

"High" doesn't turn the element on hotter, it just has a higher set point. Since many slow cookers can take over an hour to get the food inside up to temp, having it too low for the first 30 minutes has almost no difference on the temperature profile. If you had it on "warm" for a couple of hours, that would be more problematic. I'll leave the ...


2

As seen in simplest form here, the FDA has deemed the temperature danger zone at between 41°F and 135°F inclusive. Meanwhile, also in its simplest form here, we see again from the FDA that the internal temperature of pork must come to 145°F in order to be considered safe. Finally, consider the following, as found here Crock pots may vary but generally, ...


8

It won't be as nice if you place meat into the fresh tomato sauce. The reason why is because you are then essentially boiling the mince, so you won't have any caramelisation happening. That caramelisation adds a good amount of flavour to the sauce, so you'll be losing that. Sure, the mince may dry during the frying process, but remember that it will get ...


5

Mince needs to be browned, the longer the better in my opinion, to get all the nice sticky brown flavors into your dish (not just mince all meat within reason). Then I drain the fat and add onions till they go nice and brown. Then add your wine till it's reduced down to nearly nothing and then your tomatoes. The main thing to maintain the integrity of the ...


0

Just saying "no" right away isn't helpful. It's vac-packed = no air = hard place for microbes to live. I suggest opening it and giving it a smell and a rinse and then deciding from there.


0

A retailer at the markets that refuses a request for closer inspection by a prospective customer should be given a wide berth indeed. Rules of freshness apply to the retailer regardless of sale price. Use a little common sense when buying items on sale. Shopping at closing time is a great way to find bargains and makes your dollar go further. Check ...


2

No, there is nothing "wrong" or unwholesome with the meat and/or fish being sold at discounted prices. If the shop sold any produce not fit for human consumption, they would soon be out of business and presumably having to answer to local food health and hygiene authorities, depending on what part of the world you live in. At most the meat is "well hung" as ...


0

Because we don't know how hot your skillet is, how much ground meat you use and in which form the meat comes (as a thick patty or loose), you will have to use thermometer. The safe temperature of chicken and pork is the same like the safe internal temperature since there are bacterica inside the piece of meat and the suggested temperature already regards ...


3

In the case of quickly perishable items like meat, when it's not an advertised sale, shops will sharply discount prices if they anticipate that they will be otherwise left with product beyond the sell-by date. So the answer to your question is both yes and no. There is nothing wrong with buying something just before the sell-by date, but you do need to use ...



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