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0

you can tenderise any meat by use of baking soda rub, sprinkle on a few teaspoons and massage into meats, cover it with film for a few hours in the fridge, massage again and thouroughly rinse off soda and pat meat dry, works wonders


1

Greek gyros is always cuts of meat, not homogenised with herbs etc. like a donner kebab, and comes as either pork, or less commonly, chicken. In the UK what is described as 'chicken donner' or 'chicken shawarma' is almost always very similar to what is called 'chicken gyros' in Greece in terms of the meat and its appearance, though spices etc are different ...


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I have used Olive Oil too in the past with Greek Yogurt with half table spoon honey and lemon and lime to taste. Mix to form paste and apply. Brush light to remove masala coating if you want to or reduce it. Also cool the chicken in fridge so masala is less. Hope I understood your question.


3

Actually, it sounds like everything went right to me, that's a classic terrine. You simply picked the wrong recipe if you don't want fat - 1/4 of it is lard after all. When you cooked it the fat melted and got squeezed out to the sides, that's perfectly normal. If you want less fat then replace fat with gelatine which will solidify to hold it all together. ...


1

Terrines almost always shrink. The water in the ingredients evaporates out, so the volume reduces - there's nothing you can do about that. However, not filling the mould will have exacerbated the problem. All terrine recipes are careful to state that the mould should be filled - yours even says to mound it slightly. It also says to use caul fat to help it ...


5

Your best choices would be top sirloin (#1 choice), tenderloin, or one of the other (less expensive) sirloin cuts. Those cuts will be tender, flavorful, and without pockets of fat or gristle to mar the appearance of your dish. I don't recommend round because I simply don't like its flavor. Using round in this application might be one of the best ...


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Depending on the type of alarm you have, it may go off when steam is detected, as well as smoke.


2

There's no reason why you couldn't boil vegetables as you make the stock and then puree them in as a base. It's really about taste and the result you want. Making the stock without vegetables in it will give you a clear broth with a simple pork flavor and the vegetables will be distinct in it. If you add vegetables while cooking the stock and then puree ...


3

If you are going to cook a stock for 4 hours, the flavor of the vegetable will contribute to the overall flavor of the stock...but not be so great in vegetables themselves...and their texture will be very soft. I would strain and de-fat the stock... then use the stock you created to build your soup. Add vegetables at this point and cook just until the ...


0

The smell indicates a safety problem. There is no reason to add vinegar to meat (unless you bought already marinated meat, but 1) marinating mince is so unusual, the chances of finding premarinated mince are against zero, and 2) this would have been declared on the label. The likely source for the smell is bacterial fermentation. Many bacteria produce ...


2

Probably. Beef should have a faintly sweet meaty smell. An acidic or vinegary smell is never good. I'd chuck it and/or take it back and get a refund, providing it was still supposed to be in date. With any question of food safety, you have to make the trade off between your willingness to contract food poisoning and the cost of the item involved. Minced ...


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You always treat rabbit like chicken ;) temps are same. cook well. internal temp 165 . 2pounders are best for pan frying. Stew ..braising... baking..roasting.. all great ways to make rabbit :)



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