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0

Sweet cherry, smoked bacon, heaps of basil and a glass or 2 while cooking helps for a great spaghetti bolognese. I love adding a chorizo sausage during the slow simmer also!!!


3

The sludge you speak of is actually proteins called myosin (denatures at 120f) and actin (denatures at 150f) going through the stages of denaturing, coagulation and ultimately gelantization. Protein coagulates when it is denatured, that is destroyed. Gelatization is a follow on the process of breakdown in connective tissue.


5

The problem is that you're using a lid. Spatter screens keep the oil mostly contained, while still allowing any moisture to escape. A lid, on the other hand, collects the moisture on the underside of the lid. When you go to lift it, the water drops back into the oil, and causes increased spattering. You're actually better off without a lid, if you don't ...


0

No it is not safe it has exceeding USDA time and temperature guidelines. See the following for guidelines http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/safe-food-handling/danger-zone-40-f-140-f/ct_index


2

I've skimmed the other answers and I'm not seeing what I think is one of the most important tips for trying to pound out chicken breasts: temperature. Cold chicken simply refuses to play nice. Seriously. The difference between pounding out breasts fresh from the fridge and working with chicken that has been allowed to come up to temperature is night and ...


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Plastic bags from cereal boxes work well; they do not shred even with a mallet.


1

It sounds like your friend is using both acid and tannins in his marinade, a good combination. An acidic marinade does tenderize meat when left in for 2 hours or less. If left in the marinade longer than that, acids will toughen the meat rather than tenderize it. Enzyme and tannin based marinades work better long term. Red wine tends to have a good tannin ...


1

There should be no problem cooking for an extra hour or two on 'high'. The rule of thumb which I have learned is one hour on "high" = two hours on "low". Generally, you should always start with an hour on "high" in order to get the food out of the danger area for bacterial growth as soon as possible, after which you can reduce the heat to "low".


2

Id'say availability, like others have commented on. If you have access to sea, seafood is an easy choice. You cannot keep cattle high up in the mountains, that's why goats and sheep are more popular in e.g., Greece, where there are no plains for cattle to graze on. Chickens and doves are easy to keep and were cheaper than pigs or cows. Pigs are ...



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