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-2

Sorry, there is no way I would NOT wash chicken before. We have been washing chicken since the beginning of time and all of a sudden chicken juice is spreading everywhere. If you are careful, it is fine. I have been doing this all of my married life and none of us have EVER been sick from cross contamination.


1

One potential downside to this method is that with a thick coat of flour, you're mostly browning the flour, not the meat, and thus possibly creating different flavor compounds than if you were searing the meat directly. Maillard reactions are complicated stuff. If you're doing this, you should probably shake off excess flour to leave a very thin layer so ...


1

I find that when cooked meat is frozen separately it dries out quite a lot; it will still be moist after defrosting if it's submerged in its gravy as you freeze it.


3

I have done it both ways successfully. Flouring the meat before browning does give a little extra flavor, plus the flour continues to cook while the meat is braising. I personally think it gives a richer, deeper flavor and ensures that you won't have any raw flour flavor. If you are happy with your results using this method I wouldn't change it. :)


0

Lots of pedantic and bombastic responses on this site, but not so many facts. Milk and buttermilk both tenderize meat. You should try it before you knock it. The chefs at Allrecipes.com put it more succinctly than I can: "Dairy-based marinades, such buttermilk or yogurt, are probably the only marinades that truly tenderize. Only mildly acidic, they don't ...


4

I use two containers when possible. The meat and the sauce usually thaw at different rates, so you end up w chunks of frozen meat embedded in thawed sauce. This can be messy to work with. Once frozen, it's OK to combine meat and sauce in a single container. Just separate when thawing.


11

According to the USDA: If packaging is accidentally cooked in a conventional oven, is the food safe to eat? Plastic packaging materials should not be used at all in conventional ovens. They may catch on fire or melt, causing chemical migration into foods. Sometimes these materials are inadvertently cooked with a product. For example, giblets ...


0

I would recommend to always marinate the meat with spices and yoghurt for at least 6 - 8 hrs or overnight in in the fridge. This makes the meat tender and juicy plus to avoid burning never put your biryani directly on the flame. What you can do is put a tawa on the stove then sealed biryani pot on it which will surely help. Usually biryani takes 45 – 50 mins ...


4

I suspect that this is a question that it's impossible to give a definitive answer for. In reality it's probably a mixture of religion, culture and confusion. I reckon that in most cases that it boils down to "Fish isn't a meat because when I was growing up I was told it's not a meat", or something like that. In terms of etymology, "meat" originally just ...


2

People were eating fish as "non meat" long before the vegetarian society was ever formed. Religion, particularly Christianity, was just as influenced by this cultural "error". In fact, in Japan where Christianity was not introduced until the mid 1500's, fish was already considered non meat by the dominant religions of Japan, zen Buddhism and Shintoism. Up to ...


3

For a 30 min marinade, no, you don't have to put it in the fridge. In fact, many recipes will call for removing thick beef cuts from the fridge 20-60 min before cooking, to let the meat come up to room temperature. That being said, there has been some testing of what sort of difference bringing a steak to room temperature makes, and the general concensus ...


3

Food safety. Leaving meat around at room temperature is never a good idea. Two hours is the USDA recommended limit for the whole 'lifetime' of the meat. It makes little or no difference to the flavour absorption.


0

Sweet refers to the sweet basil that is not in the mild


2

Thesaurus.com has an article on the name. Their explanation is that the long sausages got compared to dachshunds. With time, people started calling them "dogs" instead of "dachshunds". They don't list a source for the information, but I hope that, being language experts, they have fact-checked it.


1

I usually add a little bit of water (just a few tablespoons) to whatever I am heating up. I find this provides additional moisture and keeps the food from getting too dry. Also, be sure to stir/flip regularly so that the food is evenly heated.


4

To get the best results reheating food in the microwave, use 50% or 75% power, and turn the plate every 20 seconds or so (if you don't have a turntable). Stir or flip a few times if you can. Only get it just hot enough, no more. Food overcooked in the microwave is just nasty.


0

As long as you cook it properly 165 F according to foodsafety.org you would have no problems. If you plan to eat it raw or rare, contamination may occur (this doesn't mean it's a Death sentence and you'll get sick for sure, but you have to know your risks)


3

Be sure to look at this related question too: How does velveting work? Serious Eats just kind of took this on. They added some nice flavor to the velveting marinade, and then sauced the chunks after cooking. Some kind of adaptation of that concept would probably work well for you. I have done some small experimentation with adding flavors to the ...


4

The flour is still there, it has just been moistened by the meat, giving it a translucent appearance. It hasn't in any way soaked into the meat. You don't have to re-flour, but you can, lightly, if you care to. By flouring the meat, you are doing a couple of really nice things. The flour will form a brown crust on the meat by virtue of the Malliard ...


3

When you coat meat with flour and let it sit for a period of tome, the flour will absorb some moisture from the meat and appear less white. It's still there. I find that allowing the time for the meat to sit before cooking produces superior results. It actually seals the meat better, keeping the moisture in and grease out. Bonus is that the crust on the ...


16

It doesn't go into the meat, it soaks up water and becomes a slurry. The slurry is transparent, so you don't see it. If you fry it as it is, you won't prevent spraying and sticking the same way it would have been possible with a dry flour layer. If you roll it again, you will have these effects again, plus slightly more heat buffering because of the double ...


1

If you defrosted it correctly (How to quickly and safely defrost chicken?), then yes. You can cook and serve it 2 (even 3 or 4) days later.



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