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13

Water freezes at 32F, but turkey contains more than just water. Alton Brown answers this question in his original turkey episode of Good eats. The meat freezes at 26F, so they can call it "fresh" if it's kept at say, 30F (below the freezing temp for water). The USDA recognizes "frozen" for a turkey as having been brought down to 0F. Apparently the middle ...


0

if you are cooking a steak on a grill and the grill is the right temperature you can usually tell by how it looks and how it bleeds. Rare - Marked/browned on all sides Medium-rare - starting to bleed and marked/browned on all sideds Medium - Bleeding red and Marked/browned on all sides Medium-Well - starting to bleed clear to only bleeding clear Well Done ...


2

To quote a comment: According to Harold McGee's "On Food and Cooking", when meat is cooked for an extended time below 120˚F or brought up to temperature slowly the myoglobin remains intact and there will be a distinct red color throughout the meat. – Didgeridrew Sep 23 '13 at 16:39 Here is the Science of Cooking article @Digdgeridrew mentioned To ...


3

Ground lamb may also be a good substitute. It has a bit more fat than veal does, which would come closer to pork (though it may change the flavor a bit, adjust seasoning as needed). Alternatively, a fattier type of ground beef should work good (like ground beef chuck which is around 80% lean habitually). This will have less impact on the flavor than ground ...


2

The body can derive energy from three main "families" of molecules: Fat. This is the highest density, at about 9 KCalories a gram. There are varying recommendations regarding the amount of fat intake to be healthy, and most major medical establishments have been seriously wrong over the past decades. In my opinion, which works for my body alone, 20% of ...


6

Hello Cheryl and welcome to Seasoned Advice! Ground veal would be an excellent choice to substitute for ground pork. I think you will find that the flavor will be closer than turkey or chicken.


1

tl;dr: You don't. Here are a few of the problems with trying to judge doneness based solely on color: Depending on the size and shape of the meat, the exterior color may or may not be any sort of indication of the internal temperature, which is the important part. A large, squarish roast cooked at a high temperature might be beautifully browned on the ...


3

As much as I don't like how broad and strange this question is, I will venture an answer. TL;DR: You can't in most cases. Not by color. Here are some things to keep in mind: Cooking method can make color vary widely. Take chicken or pork, for instance; cooking it in liquid will make its color like the liquid, frying will make it brown-ish, grilling ...


0

The short answer: No, the gamey taste of venison is not a euphemism for rotten. Factors that may contribute to strong or "gamey" flavor in venison include: the animal's diet (animals that forage a lot of grain from farm fields rather than grasses, wild plants, and nuts have a less gamey flavor) its age (older animals tend to be gamier) the inclusion of ...


1

Short answer: Not really. Doing some armchair math, you have two liters of water and 55g of salt, which is about 0.25 liter. That gives you 12.5% the amount salt as there is water in your original solution. The logical solution would be to then cook the meat, then measure the quantity of salt afterwards, right? However... That would assume that the ...


-1

My nonno (grandfather) came from Italy over 55 years ago. He has been making prosciutto, capicollo, pancetta, soppressata, salami as long as he could remember. It was passed down from his father and so on. I continued on with this family tradition, we have never used curing salts or cultures in any of our meats. We're all still alive. Table salt only!


5

Generally speaking you can serve pheasant a little pink, but not as rare as you can duck. This is more a textural thing than a safety thing though, I believe. Pheasant is quite lean so cooking it completely makes it very dry. Cooking any meat anything less than well done is technically 'risky'; you have to weigh the risk with having an enjoyable meal. ...


0

For that many guests on a budget, you will need a leg of lamb (Tesco has a whole leg, suitable for 8-10 guests, for £25 - likely more at a Halal butcher, but not in break-the-bank territory) While a crock-pot might not be large enough, an inexpensive electric roasting pan should be, and ideal for the "low and slow" braising or roasting techniques that joint ...


4

Of course you can freeze meat. If it would be unsafe, your local supermarked wouldn't be allowed to sell it. What you have to keep in mind when freezing your own meat: Storage time is limited, for guidelines see here or here. Freezing does nor remove bacteria, mold and other "nasties", but stops them from multiplying. Rule of thumb: What's on the meat ...


0

In my experience, yes, it does. I live in Mexico, we have good quality meat in the north, but not so much in the centre and south. So I put a piece of lesser quality beef tenderloin in raw milk, just enough to cover it (not pasteurized). I keep it for 3 days in the fridge at 34-36 F (1-2 Celsius). After that time, I use tap water to rinse all the milk. ...



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