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To me it's really about the juices. I often hate cookout burgers because they are so dry. Coming them medium allows juice while killing most of the bad bacteria. But I'm america we tend to use sauce to make our food good. So that's the difference. Overseas they put sauce for a hint of flavor. In America we load out food with sauce so it'll automatically ...


1

The only properly safe way to do it would be to cook the burger sous vide until it has been pasteurised. I've done burgers at 55C using thickness and the Modernist Cuisine tables to calculate the cooking time. You just have to be careful when browning them afterwards not to completely undo all your good work by leaving them on the heat for too long.


12

Beef has a firm, closed texture, which prevents bacteria penetrating far into the meat. This is why it's relatively safe to eat a rare steak: you kill the surface bacteria by searing it, and the middle is relatively bacteria free. When you grind beef, you of course mix the surface with the middle, which increases the risk. To be safe, you should therefore ...


7

You're right with your assumption that surface bacteria should to be killed and by the process of grinding meat the surfaces bateria mixes into the interior. BUT: There is also steak tartare which is basically minced beef consumed raw. The trick is to get the meat from a trustworthy source, store it at low temperatures, process it in an environment which is ...


1

I am hooked on Dario Cecchini's seasoned salt. I have found that grilling the steak first and then seasoning just before removing from the grill gives me better clarity with the subtle flavor of his very fine grind seasoned salt. And I use much less which is good because trips to Chianti are rare. Also, I do not grind pepper on the steak which would compete ...


1

Adding other ingredients to the egg/cornstarch mix will make it more likely that the velvet surface will break down. So marinate in advance of velveting. Use Soy sauce in the marinade as osmosis will draw the marinade into the meat in exchange for meat fluids. The velveting that follows will trap the marinade in the meat and give you the double effect you ...


3

I think the beauty of Italian cooking is in it's simplicity. Most classic recipes have fewer ingredients than you think and for good reason. The quality and freshness of those ingredients are key, but more is not better. If you want the meat to shine use a marbled cut (eg neck portion of Chuck) and add milk to the meat / vegetable mixture while cooking ...


2

I'd be more concerned about the meat's safety than taste/texture. "Warm" thawing creates the perfect environment for bacteria growth. That having been said, my experience mainly involves the use of a microwave to thaw meat. When microwaving meat to thaw, try to avoid the meat having corners or protrusions. This adversely affects taste/texture because they ...


2

You wouldn't want to exceed 100F, especially if you don't have good temperature regulation. Above this temperature (especially in fish) you'll start to see the texture begin to change. But, if all you're trying to do is thaw the meat, it's more important to circulate the water than to have the water at a warm temperature. Water with strong convection ...


2

You've answered your own question, it's size and shape. You could buy a roast and slice it into chops and you'd get the same thing as if the butcher does it. That's if they are both pork sirloin, sometimes there can be confusion between sirloin and tenderloin, which are not the same thing.


0

Chicken =2 days...meats such as steaks, lamb, pork = 5 days. Here's the link to Food safety.gov, you can find the definite answers you seek on this page :) http://www.foodsafety.gov/blog/marinades.html



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