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0

Place a Tawa below the vessel, and cook it for 45 minutes in low flame. All problem will be solved. TESTED!!!!


4

The baking time doesn't really depend on the weight. It depends on the thickness, and how well done you want it. The FDA recommends cooking to 145F, but you'll probably find it a lot nicer in the 120-130F range. There's a lot of room for personal preference, so it's hard to be too precise. It doesn't need to be held at the temperature for any length of ...


0

450 seems a little high. I would roast a 2 kg piece of salmon at 400 F for 50 min to 1 hour. Once the flesh flakes easily its done.


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Frozen meat wont allow to penetrate ingredients while cooking ....


0

I wondered much the same how the Chinese takeaway got their chicken so tender and googled the question and found the answer below. I cannot credit the writer as I did not keep a note, but I can tell you it works. I have not tried it with beef though, but having just done a beef curry with diced beef that has been in the freezer for over two years and was a ...


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Well I certainly know the flavor can get out. I have been experimenting with fried chicken - butter milk and flour - and want to make a kfc style hot and spicy. Easier said than done. I have tried adding bottles of hot chilli sauce, chopping up piles of chilli and adding tablespoons of cayenne pepper. In every case the "Hot" gets out. I think the ...


-1

If the plastics contain BPA, yes it is harmful, permanent, and can be transferred to unborn children during pregnancy. Not only is it harmful cooked within your food but also even touching your food. The only way to get the chemical makeup of the utensils is to probably call the company, though the law does not force them to give this information to the ...


1

There is one sense in which searing meat really does seal it. For a long time it was genuinely believed that searing meat in some way "sealed" it. As other answers have already shown, this is nonsense. Indeed it's quite easy to prove: Sear a piece of meat. Roast the piece of meat. Observe whether the meat inflates or perhaps bursts. If you put a sealed ...


9

Is "sealing in the flavor" an actual thing? No, it isn't. As Harold McGee explains in his excellent reference work On Food and Cooking (emphasis mine): The best-known explanation of a cooking method is probably this catchy phrase: "Sear the meat to seal in the juices." The eminent German chemist Justus von Liebig came up with this idea around 1850. ...


0

I personally know nothing about cooking but my dear departed mother did. She used a tip that had been passed on by her mother. Before cooking, she would treat meat by pouring on boiling water and then drying. I remember once asking why and she said that she did it to seal the meat. I didn't probe further but I always assumed that it somehow kept the flavour ...


-1

True story: I love beef jerky. The other day when I had a whole topside to play with, I made a batch of biltong on top of the three batches of jerky I had made. Just for fun (and to see what would happen) I seared two of the fillets and treated the other three with vinegar as usual for biltong. I then put all 5 into my dehydrater at 35C and waited for ...


20

There is a grain of truth in the claim that flash-freezing beef "seals in flavour". If meat (or anything else) is frozen slowly, large ice crystals form. These puncture the cells, resulting in a mushy texture when the food is thawed. But, because a lot of the cells have burst, all their contents can drain out, too, so you're going to lose flavour. However, ...


31

Searing on a grill to "seal in juices" has largely been disproven. Meat loses juice at roughly the same speed regardless of searing the meat first. Searing does produce the Maillard reaction and caramelization which enhances flavor; however, searing first doesn't produce better results. A test performed by Alton Brown in 2008 demonstrated that searing at ...


2

You are correct in saying using color to determine doneness is less reliable in older meat. As the meat is exposed to air, it oxidizes giving it a brownish color. When checking for doneness, people sometimes see this oxidized brown color and mistaken it for being fully cooked through. However, this can occur for fresher meats also. According to the USDA ...


1

It's fine. I wouldn't eat any wild-caught game on the that was cooked on the rare side (microbes and parasites are a problem with most wild stuff), but if it's thoroughly cooked you should be fine. I've actually eaten it before, and not to belabor the cliche, but it actually does taste kinda like chicken. The texture is better than chicken though.


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I'm in the Cincinnati area, and there is a restaurant in Springfield OH that serves alligator. http://www.pappadeaux.com/menu/


4

Yes you can and it is. Google 'menu alligator' and you will find plenty of restaurants that actually have it on the menu, like this one, this one or this one. I doubt that a restaurant would (be allowed to) have it on the menu if it's unsafe to eat.


0

Looked at the issue of cooking frozen meat when I was thinking about grilling a pork roast. I do partially thaw the meat in the refridgerator, amount of time depending on the thickness and type of meat. In the case of the pork roast, I will thaw it overnite and start grilling it later the next day (about 16 hours thaw time). Cornish hens I thaw overnite, ...



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