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1

Chopped pork is not an uncommon thing to see in Southern barbecue. Though it is largely in whole hog barbecue. With whole hog, you have to cook the tougher cuts a little less than desired, in order to keep the cuts with less connective tissue from becoming overcooked. If you want some unsolicited advice, I would suggest giving your roast another hour of ...


2

You need to cook the meat until it's basically falling apart on its own. And you need to cook it for a long time over low heat -- high heat will cause it to toughen up. Once it's cooked, you should be able to pull it apart pretty easily with your hands, or with a couple of forks. If there are bones, you should be able to easily pull them free of the meat ...


8

You definitely want to pill the pork apart with a pair of forks or your fingers. The best way I find is to allow little "clumps" of pork to permeate the mix. Note that while books talk about cutting against the grain of meat, that is for raw or cooked meat meant to be sliced and served. The reason you cut against the grain in that situation is to tenderize ...


3

Personally I do the pulling with my fingers. Makes it easier to pick out any gristle, veins and fat.


2

I've cooked lots of meat in my President's Choice rice maker, which comes equipped with a steaming tray. The rice cooks for about 50 minutes, and if it senses there's extra water or moisture in there, it will keep extending the time by 1 minute. I have literally thrown entire 1.5" thick pork chops in there, chicken leg quarters, a small sirloin roast, all ...


0

I use 2 very thin plastic cutting sheets with the Chicken in between them , this works great ! No mess.


0

If the meat is not spoiled, the reason might be that the animal was stressed before killing: The smell can be from lactic acid or its decomposition products. Other reason, yet not very probable, is that the animal was underfed and suffered from catabolic condition - this could be the case with a milk cow. Or perhaps the meat was just stored in a wrong ...


0

It is past Easter but for future you may want to try this. Get a saute pan or a saute pot you want to roast in, heat it and then brown your roast, all sides. Before you do that, be sure you season your roast very well so that when you put it in the hot saute pan with the oil you are browning the dry seasonings also (be generous with your seasonings). Once ...


0

You can serve almost any protein medium rare. I wouldn't want to eat poultry at that temperature, mind you. Cooking the protein to high temperature is not the only way to cook it safely. The high temperature kills almost all of the bacteria in seconds. But a lower temperature for a longer period of time does just as well. For instance, this chart lists ...


0

I learned to cook as a very young, new bride from my husband's aunt who had cooked for the USO in World War II. I learned before microwave ovens were commercially available. This was in 1970. I cooked chicken and rice from frozen cut up chickens and made spaghetti sauce from frozen ground beef. They were good and no one got sick. I expect the key was the ...


2

I have a vegetable/fruit juicer and add the pulp to ground chicken meatballs and meatloaf because they tend to be dry without it. I use the pulp from juicing a mix of kale, beets and beet greens, apple, carrot, and ginger and it really works to moisten the chicken. The ginger adds a hint of Asian flavor, so omit if you don't want that. I am sure this would ...


0

My usual hiking partners and I have used prosciutto on several camping trips lasting between 5 and 14 days all mid summer. We have never had a problem with cured meats not being refrigerated. They taste great and have never given any of us any stomach issues. Salted pork has been around for a lot longer than refrigeration has. However as with anything read ...


0

One solution is to sprinkle it with salt and pepper, place it in a small baking dish covered with aluminum foil, and bake in a 325 degree oven for about an hour or so. The fat will render nice and slowly and the meat will crisp up in certain areas. The meat will be delicious in tacos, sandwiches, over pasta, or on its own!


0

As food safety is the foremost consideration here, I'd say it's OK to cook frozen food right out of the freezer. There's no germs involved, and any surviving germs will be thoroughly cooked by the oven or stove. And cooked germs/microbes taste good! I BBQ meat taken directly from the freezer hundreds of times now. I can attest to the taste of my BBQ! ...


0

Another option if you have a meat grinder would be to mix it with a leaner cut of meat to increase the fat content when making sausages.


0

How about making boneless Ribs?


4

I always save all my scraps to make stock. I'm not sure what you would do with lamb stock, but it would probably make a good sauce to use on lamb. The fat that renders out is also useful for future cooking of whatever it came from (duck fat for duck confit, for example). I just throw all the scraps into a slow cooker with celery, carrot, and onion ...



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