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1

My husband and I regularly grind our own meat. What we do is trim the meat before cubing. If any connective tissue / silver-skin is on the outside of the meat or running through the meat we are getting it off of a larger piece of meat, which is much easier because you can get a better hold on it. We also use a filet knife for trimming the tough tissue. It ...


5

Regarding the chemistry of what happened here, @rumtscho's comment addresses that very nicely. Quoting from the relevant portion of the linked answer: This scum is made from proteins. Meat contains muscle fibers (the proteins actin and myosin) as well as some loose proteins swimming in the fluids within the meat (the cell plasma). When you cook meat, ...


2

Update: After reading a bit on this, (and also fully reading the question) I found that there have been papers written on the effects of acid baths on meat tenderness as well as enzyme treatment: Acid: http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1010&context=animalscidiss Enzyme: ...


4

Based on the description given in the manga (specifically "I rubbed it on the meat before boiling" [emphasis mine]) I would guess that this is not actually an effect of tenderization at all. Instead, the effect is possibly closer to that of velveting. The velveting technique is typically done with a thin coating of corn starch, and my working theory is ...


-2

Yes, it will work by osmosis, but not very well, and very slowly. It will take lots of time, just like salt does. You tenderise by either adding enzymes (which honey does not have, because it is very pure without any proteins or fats, energy storages of bees) or activating enzymes...like salt does by breaking cell walls or getting fluids between the cells. ...


0

You could fry it off with your veg base, remove it, make your soup and then add the chorizo to serve. Boiling chorizo is just a bit of a waste


-2

It's possible that a specific variety of honey may contain enzymes that would tenderise meat, but standard commercial honey would act as a preservative.


-1

Honey is not a tenderizer, pineapple juice is. It's the acidity of the pineapple juice. Honey has a low pH but it is far too viscous to penetrate pores.


1

Besides the issues with contamination, a good tight seal helps to contain any sloshing when you're moving the container around. This reduces the chance of spashing brine when intentionally moving the container, or when pushing it out of the way to get to something behind it. A minute or so of prevention can save you a significant amount of time in cleaning ...


1

It helps prevent contamination from outside sources. You don't want nasties in your brine anymore than you do in your fresh salad.


4

There are a few more problems with frozen ingredients that might not be obvious at first: The cut of the ingredients is usually already defined by how the factory did it, and might or might not be as desired, be it for textural, cooking behaviour, or presentation reasons. There is always more free water in what you pour out of a freezer bag versus what ...


12

I like chef Ramsay, he can be snobbish and course at times but he knows food and he's a straight shooter and tells it like it is. Sometimes he's just saying the food isn't hot or even warm in the middle, but some times he is referring to frozen vs fresh ingredients. Most food is better when it's fresh, because freezing destroys cell walls and breaks down ...


0

You may be able to use the gas grill for "low & slow" BBQ, although it wouldn't be ideal. You'd need someplace to put the wood chips to make the smoke, and I assume, as does your grill manufacturer, that the grill is located in a well-ventilated area. The grill would need to be set low, and you would absolutely have to make sure that you had a ...


-1

This is my go to method: Lightly season your steaks on all sides with olive oil, coarse sea salt and black pepper and let stand at room temp at least 15 mins-20 mins dry heat a heavy cast iron grill pan if you have one or use a regular pan over high heat Open fan & windows (seriously) in a regular pan: add steaks and cook 3 mins on 1st side then 3 To 4 ...


1

A marinade has two functions, firstly to infuse flavour and secondly to break down the muscles fibres ad connective tissue in tougher cuts, this not only makes them less tough but also helps to bring out the extra flavour that these cuts have compared to the 'premium' ones. For something like a slow cooked stew marinade and cooking times are somewhat ...


0

It sounds like the problem might be that the meat might have been a bit dry rather than tough as such. Paradoxically cut of meat which are tender when cooked quickly because they have little fat or connective tissue (esp loin) can end up bland and dry after slow cooking. If you fry off the meat and vegetables in a bit of butter and add a bit of venison or ...


0

You certainly can freeze raw meat - but only if it has not already been frozen and thawed. That is dangerous because it will have developed more bacteria.


0

Living in the mountains where a good beef stew in the winter is just what the butcher ordered, I make a few of them over the winter months. For some reason this time I listened to what some well-meaning online recipe ninny wrote about coating these wonderful chuck roast pieces with flour, so I tried it ! I could choke myself, I now have a pot of super-thick ...


1

You want to accomplish two things: an interior of fifty two degrees C, and a seared exterior. As mentioned, cooking sous vide is the perfect solution: first cook it, take a flamethrower and mke the crust. No need to rest it either. Without a sous vide you can use your oven set to low temp, and and a thermometer..remove when fifty two degrees and sear..this ...



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