New answers tagged

0

Yes. If you don't, you've made biltong instead.


0

Three days is pushing it, in my opinion. Best use on the second day.


19

Yes, that'll contaminate your spices. You really don't want to touch anything after touching raw meat, unless it's something you're about to wash or cook. It's not too hard to avoid this though. You can keep a clean hand and a dirty hand - grab spices with the clean one, rub them in with the other. As Joe points out, this is also helpful if you end up ...


3

You could try using a vegetable dicer. This professional one specifically says it works for chicken breast. If you have a lot of chicken to dice it maybe worth it, but it won't be real quick to clean. If this is too much machine for what you want to accomplish, smaller home versions are made, something like this home vegetable dicer might work for you. ...


8

You're wrong in your observation to begin with. There are tons of things with meat and seafood: Cajun food often combines sausage, chicken and seafood (e.g. gumbo and jambalaya) "Surf and turf" is a catchall term for red meat plus seafood in American-ish cuisine, and comes in all kinds of forms (each separately, one stuffed with the other, a burger with ...


2

A food processor on pulse setting should be able to do thing.


0

One consideration that hasn't been mentioned in your selection of a pan. If you use something like cast iron, you require some time to heat it up, but it will continue to cook the meat even after you've turned off the burner. A thinner pan will require leaving the burner on the whole cooking time. Personally, I'd look into slicing the meat thinly so that ...


1

Answering more as a chemical engineer - we study heat transfer. A lid clearly reduces heat loss. A lid also turns the pan into an oven - you hold the heat and use it on the non burner side. A little bit of water will put more molecules in the vapor phase for more heat transfer but dilutes flavor. More than little bit is waste. Steam is 1000 x the ...


1

As @Jefromi says, there is no simple answer. Also depends on your definition of "cooked". For water vs oil, most likely oil is more energy efficient. Frying a 16 oz steak takes only ~5/10 minutes, whereas boiling 16 oz of meat in water will take at least double that time, even if you use exact same pan and exact same stove. If you cut the meat more ...


0

I doubt there's a simple perfect answer. You'd want to cook it hot, but not too hot, and with a little bit of water water, but not too much. If you cook too hot you're wasting energy, since it takes time for the heat to propagate to the center of the meat. If you don't cook hot enough to at least keep everything at 100C, you'll be wasting more energy over ...


1

Vinegar is acidic thanks to its concentration of acetic acid. It thus has a low pH, somewhere between 2.5 and 5 depending on the type of vinegar. Acidic substances can affect the delicate amino acids which form the proteins that make up the majority of your meat (along with other fats and connective tissues). The end result is not entirely unlike what ...


0

I'll add a little to Tim's answer, since I have experience with low-temperature water-bath cooking (sous vide). A water bath is about the gentlest way you can reheat something. You can set your water bath to 125°, 130°F, place bagged (thin) items in the bath—straight from the fridge—and come back half an hour to an hour later to them gently warmed. Except ...


1

I've never reheated meat or fish to the same flavor and texture that it originally had. I use a small convection oven on a low temperature to bring steaks / ribs / chicken back up to temperature but: Even though I manage to keep close to the same doneness of the steaks, they're not as juicy. When I tried reheating them in au jus, I lost the doneness. ...


0

I often have the same problem. Besides other suggestions of finding a good spot to thaw and to freeze your meat in smaller pieces - I would suggest if you have a microwave and you're in a pinch, you can finish the thawing process in it. Make sure to use a "defrost" or "thaw" setting as this is lower power and is less likely to start cooking your meat. These ...


2

What I did to solve my problem was I made a thick cheese sauce with some of the pepperjack/sharp cheddar (grated some of it, coated in corn starch, melted in a little bit of milk), and mixed that into the meat mix, just enough cheese sauce to bind it, just enough to make the meat start sticking together (and I reduced amount of sliced cheese on top and ...


1

Take a Mozzarella cheese ball and break apart about 2 inch sections. Take enough that you think is going to be enough for how much meat you would like for your sandwich. Put the ingredients of meat and cheese together in a food processor. Grind together and then cook or sear the patties. The cheese should melt well enough to hold all of the meat with it, and ...


2

As a couple of commenters already mentioned, the base of the pressure cooker gets hotter than the rest, and chicken is no homogeneous size. I would like to add that besides the size difference between pieces of chicken, there is also a difference in tenderness. Breast meat is more tender so it will pressure cook faster, while legs and wings will be ...


-1

Because steam is hotter than water, any pieces of chicken submerged in the cooking liquid will take longer to cook, and pieces surrounded only by steam will cook faster. In either case, cooking proceeds from the outside in, so larger pieces of chicken will take longer to cook than smaller pieces. You mentioned that your mother heats the pressure cooker for ...



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