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9

There isn't really a technical reason for this in most cases. It is for the convenience of the cook, to get things mixed thoroughly with a minimum of mess and hassle. However, with meat loaf, once you add the egg, it gets even more sticky and messy. When I make meatloaf or meatballs, I actually do it in three stages: Mix all the onions, herbs, spices ...


8

Putting the lid on will tend to steam your meatloaf on top, rather than baking it, as the moisture that evaporates from it will have no where to go. This will inhibit getting those nice crispy brown bits. If I were to double a meatloaf, I would not simply put it in a larger casserole. Instead, I would make two... erm... loaves. This would: Ensure ...


6

You'll likely do better first trying a recipe, and see how it comes out and we can tell you how to adjust it for your preferences, but a few things to consider when making meatloaf: Don't squish the meat or work it too much while you're mixing it; you'll end up with a rather dense meatloaf. (unless of course you like that sort of thing). Some people ...


6

If you hate the soy burgers, you will probably hate meatloaf made from them. Your best bet might be to defrost 1 or 2 burgers and mix them with ground beef (or whatever meat you use for meatloaf) with no more than 25% of the mix being the soy burgers. If you like your first meatloaf, you can always try a little bit higher percentage of the soy burgers next ...


4

In Sweden, breadcrumbs or porridge oats are sometimes used as an alternative to egg for binding k├Âttbullar (meatballs). The crumbs or oats are mixed with boiling water and left for a while until you have a porridge-like consistency and then mixed into the ground meat. Unfortunately I don't know the exact ratios of dry ingredient/water/ground meat since I ...


4

Avery's "fattest turkey" advice is solid. I try to find ground turkey breast as opposed to ground turkey, no matter what I plan to do with it, because it's easier to keep it from drying out in various recipes. As he said, ground turkey is so easy to overcook. You could always add some moisture by throwing some bacon grease into the mix, which I have done ...


4

My mom's meatloaf recipe included a couple slices of bread that had been soaked in milk and then blenderized with the egg before mixing in to the meat. The milk obviously provides moisture, and the bread a nice carbohydrate matrix to hold onto that moisture. Give that a shot, I bet it will hydrate your turkey. (Do you dare take meatloaf advice from a 25 year ...


2

In general, fat in ground meat will keep dishes made with it moist. You can substitute a non-fat liquid (such as stock or tomato juice) for the fat to gain back some of the moisture, but it will change the texture. We've had good results using salsa in our meatloaf, since it provides acidity, vegetables, spice, and liquid. This reduces the amount of egg and ...


2

It's best to use the fattest ground turkey you can find if you are worried about moisture. Don't use the extra lean grinds as fat helps keep the meatloaf moist. If you can find a mixture of ground turkey that is labeled turkey breast or has dark meat in it this will help. Also, make sure not to overcook the meatloaf as turkey is by far one of the easiest ...


2

Most meatloaf recipes I googled have an egg in them. It's probably there as a binder, to hold the loaf together, rather than flavour - similar to how many people add a little egg to a hamburger mix to help the hamburgers hold together. However, just like a hamburger, in a meatloaf you could get away without using the egg, depending on how dry vs. meaty the ...


1

Yes, you can cook a meatloaf from frozen. At 350F (175C), it will take about 1.5 times the length of time it would take to cook a non-frozen meatloaf of the same size. You will get more of a crust cooking a meatloaf from frozen, so consider that while considering whether to cook the loaf in a pan or not, also whether to glaze it. The crust will be somewhat ...


1

My mom's meatloaf (which is obviously the best), uses oatmeal... Similar to @Chris's suggestion... You don't taste the oatmeal, it binds correctly, it adds a little bit of fiber, and quite frankly, I think it takes some of the heaviness off of the meatloaf.


1

There is this article in the NYT about using ground flax seed as an egg substitute. http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/09/04/replacing-eggs-with-flax/ I have used this with good results in cookie recipes and would expect similar results with meatloaf. However not having eggs but having ground flax seed seems a bit of a stretch. In that case, I ...


1

Some stale bread soaked in milk can also be used to keep the meat together.



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