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31

The way you've described is precisely how I melt chocolate. If you have a double boiler, that's even better, but a bowl on top of a pot is fine too. I can only think of two things that might be affecting the quality of your end result: Is the bowl big enough? The melting bowl should be larger than the pot if possible; you want the steam to be forced ...


17

If you're not talking about very much water getting into the bowl, then these techniques should help. Remove the bowl of chocolate from the heat source. For every ounce of chocolate, add one tablespoon of one of these: warm water, melted butter, vegetable oil, hot milk/cream. Stir or whisk until smooth. Add a bit more liquid if needed. Use the repaired ...


15

I always melt chocolate in microwave. Once you are familiar with the process it saves you a lot of time. Here is what I do: Use chocolate chips or finely chopped chocolate Put them in large bowl and put the bowl in the microwave Microwave for a small amount of time, say 30 seconds (you will easily decide how much time you need for the amount of chocolate ...


11

I just reviewed the Nielsen Massey website and under their FAQ's they suggest that vanilla powder be used for "liquid sensitive products". The powdered nature of the vanilla would allow you to add it to melted chocolate without causing the melted chocolate to seize up. While vanilla has a unique and characteristic flavor of its own, it also helps to ...


10

I can think of at least three things that will cause chocolate to seize - which refers to when melted or melting chocolate suddenly becomes hard again: Using too high a heat. Double-boiler is the safest, but you can use a saucepan on very low heat. Sugar bloom and other impurities. You shouldn't get this with baker's chocolate, but if you use any ...


10

Chocolate is an odd substance when it comes to melting and hardening. When chocolate hardens, its melting point will end up being just a few degrees higher than the hardening temperature. When chocolate crystallizes at high temperatures, it forms a strong, dense crystalline structure that, texture-wise, is quite brittle. Most bought chocolate (baker's ...


8

In order to get the chocolate to harden correctly, still look shiny, and have that nice snap when it is broken, you need to temper your chocolate. There are many methods for doing this, but the seeding method on this site is most people's preference: http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article/155/Tempering-Chocolate After that you tempered chocolate, ...


7

My guess is that you're adding the brandy cold, and the chocolate may also only be partially melted. Try: Ensuring that the chocolate is thoroughly melted; Heating the brandy first (to just below boiling); Gradually adding the chocolate to the brandy (not vice versa). Chocolate seizes the worst with small amounts of liquid, so you're doing the opposite, ...


7

Tempering, in scientific terms, is a process of encouraging the cocoa butter to form a stable From V crystal structure. When you temper chocolate, you are first melting the chocolate to a temperature that will break all of the crystals, leaving you a more or less uncrystalized soup of melted chocolate. From this clean starting point, you somehow encourage ...


7

It depends on what you're doing with the chocolate. If temperature isn't that critical and its going to be mixed into a cake or brownies or such, then do it in the microwave. Its simpler and as long as you don't rush it, its does a good job. Just go 10-20 seconds at a time, in bowl that doesn't hold heat well. If you need precise temperature controlled ...


7

How do you make chocolate thin enough to dip strawberries? Melt it. I'm not trying to be funny here -- you should have no problem dipping strawberries or pretty much anything else (that's solid) in melted chocolate. When candy makers coat things in chocolate, that's all they're using -- they don't add anything to make the chocolate thinner. If you're ...


6

I find the safest method to be the oven. Water is the big enemy of chocolate, even a drop or two will ruin a batch, so when I want to be safe, I melt my chocolate in the oven. I use an oven proof ceramic bowl. I place the chopped cooking chocolate in the bowl, turn the oven to its lowest setting (mine is 180°F) and place the bowl in the oven. Check ...


6

Your best bet is to start with a good quality tempered chocolate and melt it just to the point of melting, which is to say keep it 88° - 91°F (if you ever do end up getting a thermometer). Most suggest using a microwave for this in short bursts to keep the chocolate from getting too hot. If you use a double boiler, use a low heat and go slow. Pull the bowl ...


6

From the recipe and your "fudge" description, I think the problem was that you didn't get enough air in the batter. Trying a different recipe is a good idea. The way to get more air into a flourless cake is through the eggs. Look for recipes which require you to beat the egg whites separately to soft peaks. Mix everything very carefully, in the correct ...


5

Most fats work (this is why cocoa butter works) most people recommend Crisco but a small amount of low flavoured oil (or flavoured for that matter) is fine. I like ganache so personally extra thick double cream does it for me. Either way it's easier to add more later than take out! Start with a little bit.


5

If it was just a few drops of water, keep mixing for two or three minutes while keeping the chocolate warm. The water will evaporate and the chocolate will remix. If it is more water, use it as @JustRightMenus suggested.


5

If it has a shiny/reflective surface and doesn't melt or bloom (much) at room temperature or hand temperature, then it's already tempered. Virtually every packaged chocolate is already tempered. Untempered chocolate generally needs to be refrigerated for longer-term storage, so if a package doesn't specify refrigeration (and I've never seen one that does), ...


5

Melting chocolate in a double boiler is the safest method for melting chocolate, and it's fairly easy. But it makes two pots dirty. I didn't had the problem of it being grainy. So I don't know what to say about that. Melting chocolate in the microwave oven is faster and requires less dishes, but you have the risk of burning. Therefore, lower the wattage and ...


5

If really want to substitute for that coconut oil in this particular application, you want a pure, relatively flavorless, saturated fat. This will be one that is solid at room temperature. That means commercial shortening, such as the US brand Crisco. Update: cocoa butter itself, of course would be ideal, if you can get it. But, then you would want to ...


5

There are two things to keep in mind while melting chocolate: Keep a low uniform heat I start off the melting process with low to medium heat. Once the chocolate fully melts, I reduce the heat to low and keep gently stirring all the while. If you allow the chocolate to cool, it separates out into non-uniform areas of heat, and the cooler pockets start ...


4

I am sorry, but the accepted answer is incorrect in many details. When chocolate seizes, it is due to a small amount of moisture. Imagine a cup of sugar. It will pour freely. If you add a small amount of water, clumps of the sugar will stick together and stop flowing. Add enough water, and the combination of sugar and water dissolve together, and flow ...


4

I agree with Aaronut's answer. Another reason you may be having problems with chocolate seizing is that you aren't adding enough liquid. Are you trying to "go easy" on the brandy and use less than your recipe calls for? If so, that is most likely the problem. A little liquid will cause the chocolate to seize, but a lot will not. Here's an example that will ...


4

Straight baker's chocolate should harden just fine I'd think. We make almond bark and it hardens right back to it's original hardness. Melt your chocolate in a double boiler, then pour into the molds (I'm guessing you're okay, but you might need to cover with cooking spray), then I'd probably just pop it right into the freezer. Remove when fully hardened and ...


4

I don't know the details of this particular recipe, so you'll have to excuse me if this comes across as a bit of a shot in the dark, but here are a few things that could have gone wrong: Grainy chocolate is usually a sign of seizing. White chocolate still contains cocoa butter and can still seize. Therefore it's important not to let any liquid touch the ...


4

Spanish hot chocolate and Italian cioccolata fiorentina both use cornstarch as a thickening agent. Both are used more for dipping or sipping (churros in the former case), however you could easily just use less cornstarch to make it more 'drinkable'. Try a teaspoon of cornstarch, mixed with a little cold water, added to the milk when you boil it. As Kate ...


4

Chocolate is a sol, consisting of solid particles suspended in cocoa butter. It is something similar to a hard emulsion. And it can separate just the way a liquid emulsion does (think mayonnaise). This happens when you melt the cocoa butter completely, so the solid particles separate from the fat. If it happens to a chocolate bar, your chocolate looks grey. ...


4

Most chocolate you buy are already tempered(the ones with real cocao butter) but when you melt the chocolate so you can work with it, you must temper it again. I found this great article on allrecipe in regards to this. It gives step by step information about melting and tempering chocolate. http://allrecipes.com/howto/tempering-chocolate/


4

Heating it up in the microwave will temporarily make it runnier, but then it will go back to its original consistency. Here are some ways that may work for you: Add some neutral flavored oil: just a bit though or it will get greasy Add chocolate syrup: chocolate syrup is very runny will thin it out while still keeping the chocolate flavor. Hershey's is ...


3

Yes. The way I was taught to temper chocolate was in a microwave, with no thermometer: Heat on high for 20 seconds. Stir for 20 seconds. Repeat until the chocolate is smooth. If it's almost smooth after a twenty-second stirring session, keep stirring until it's actually smooth rather than putting it back in the microwave. Always end with stirring. The ...



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