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In the time before electric mixing, chocolate, made by hand, sometimes required the effort of multiple people switching out as they tired, needed to work on some other task, or switched in and out cheaper laborers and experts during less or more critical stages of the process. Mixing chocolate in one direction is important not because there's "one true ...


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The only way it would matter which direction you stir is if there is some difference in the way you stir one direction vs the other. For example, if the industrial size mixer they were using in your friend's chocolate factory had blades that were shaped to move in a specific direction.


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Hello @stir_choc and welcome to Seasoned Advice! You really gave us a tough question! I have to admit that I had never heard of this. However after much digging it appears that there is in fact a very scientific explanation for the reason behind this. When I first started researching this, I came up with many results for recipes that gave the instruction ...


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I see enough here: Rheological measurements of chocolate quality: non-Newtonian liquid non-ideal plastic behavior time-dependent behavior Thixotropic/non-thixotropic transition To make me think that changing the direction in which you are stirring melted chocolate might easily cause changes in the properties of the melt that take a while to settle down. ...


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It sounds like the "one correct direction" thing isn't real. However, it's definitely a good idea to stir consistently in one direction, to keep things flowing smoothly (laminar flow) rather than creating turbulence. It's possible that they picked one direction as the standard direction and told everyone to stir that way to make sure it was consistent. But ...


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One must stir molten chocolate in whatever direction one feels like. Really. There's no magic about what direction you stir. There's not even really any magic about always stirring in one direction, though if your stirring technique is bad, being told to pick a direction and stick to it can help improve it. (As in, if your stirring technique involves ...


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I think most chocolate is already tempered when you buy it. Assuming that's the case with yours, you just need to be careful not to break the temper when you melt it. That means not letting it get too much warmer than its melting temperature. If my memory is correct, you have to keep it below 125 deg. F to avoid breaking temper. Coincidentally, I mixed ...



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