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30

Butter may look totally amorphous, but there's actually a fair amount of structure in the fat, in particular fat crystals that make it firmer. Melting it disrupts all that structure, and it can't regain it just by resolidifying, so the structure of previously melted butter really is different. You might notice that this is similar to chocolate: if you take ...


29

Part of making butter is churning... the churning process introduces a ton of air into the butter. When you melt it, all of the air is released so you should never expect melted butter to return to the same state it was before it was melted. The air trapped in butter is what causes the lighter color you see... if you take softened butter and whip it (as ...


20

There is indeed a physical change that occurs. If you think back to grade school science you probably remember learning about solutions and suspensions, and how the former is a mixture that stays mixed when left alone (like saltwater) and the latter is a insoluble particles dispersed in a liquid, which separate if left alone (like water and sand if you ...


17

Normal cheese melts like that. It is made of proteins, fats, and water, and these separate when they are heated. For dipping, you need processed cheese. It has additives which keep the fat, fluid and solids mixed in a smooth mass. Also, it really helps to use very slow and even heat. This is the easy option. If you want to do it "for real", without ...


12

If you can, just get better marshmallow skewers/forks. If there are two prongs on the end, the marshmallow can't rotate. (And as long as you're not holding it at a really steep angle, they'll have a hard time sliding off the end too.) You can get fancy ones with nice handles, but just plain metal is fine. And it doesn't have to be super strong, so you can ...


12

I just reviewed the Nielsen Massey website and under their FAQ's they suggest that vanilla powder be used for "liquid sensitive products". The powdered nature of the vanilla would allow you to add it to melted chocolate without causing the melted chocolate to seize up. While vanilla has a unique and characteristic flavor of its own, it also helps to ...


10

Try heating a couple table spoons of butter with some flour in a pot for a couple of minutes stirring with a wooden spoon then add enough hot milk to make the mixture smooth. Melting the grated cheese in flour prevents the oils from separating and the proteins from curdling. (edit) If you want to search for a recipe, a B├ęchamel sauce with grated cheese ...


9

Are you using a metal skewer? Metal will carry heat much more than other materials such as wood, and will cause the inside of the marshmallow where it is skewered to soften and slide under the weight of the rest of the marshmallow. If you're aiming for a golden brown crust, then the key is to cook it quickly at just the right distance away so that the ...


8

If all you're trying to do is melt it, then there's no structure you can mess up. The only harm you can cause is by scorching or burning spots, which might happen if your microwave is uneven and you heat too fast without stirring. But otherwise, the microwave is a great way to melt chocolate. Open it up and give it a stir now and then, be careful not to ...


7

My guess is that you don't have real cheese in your sandwich. I've seen this before with things called cheese that were really types of American cheese. It happened when then product was exposed to moisture that it seemed to absorb, which then caused it to turn soggy and glue-like. If you'd have said that you had tomato in your sandwich, I'd have been sure ...


7

Three factors influence how well cheese melts: The amount of moisture, The amount of fat, How it was set. The meltiest cheeses have a lot of moisture and fat and were set with rennet and not acid. Both moisture and fat leave space between the casein proteins that allows them to move. Otherwise they are packed together and don't flow as well. Aged cheeses ...


6

It very well might destroy the structure of the chocolate. Since cocoa butter has a crystalline structure, when it cools it will set differently based on how how it was. If melt chocolate over water, you're guaranteed (more or less) that none of it will reach a temperature over 212 Fahrenheit. If you melt it in the microwave, due to the nature of the ...


6

The magic is from Sodium Citrate Most mass produced cheese it based on "cheddar blends". Basically large (50 Kg to 1 Mg) blocks of cheese are made in a milk factory. When a consumer product is to be made from it, the cheddar is shredded, flavour and/or culture is added, and then using heat and pressure it is re-packed into consumer sized packages In some ...


5

This is tricky because you don't really want the cheese to melt, you want it to become pliable enough to roll. When making fresh mozzarella, the curds are heated in 90 - 100 degree F water to make them pliable, then heated further (maybe 120 F) for stretching and folding. This is for fresh. I would assume factory produced mozzarella will behave slightly ...


5

There is the good way and the cheap way. The good way is fondue. Acid and / or alcohol are used to cut up the cheese proteins so it isn't stringy and the cheese is heated gently to not break the emulsion. You can look up a recipe. <napoleonDynamite>There are, like, an infinity of them.</napoleonDynamite> The cheap way is processed cheese product. ...


3

You're first melting it all and mixing it together, right? You can just compute the cacao contents of the resulting mixture. For that you'll need to weigh the three batches. Say the 54% batch is 200g, the 63% batch is 150g and the 86% batch is 100g. Then you have a total of 54% * 200g + 63% * 150g + 86% * 100g = 108g + 94.5g + 86g = 288.5g of cacao out of a ...


3

I'm not familiar with the anti-seize property, but I can tell you what (tapioca) maltodextrin is. It is a modified food starch with the amazing property that it thickens fat instead of water-based liquids. If you have ever eaten at a restaurant that does the molecular-gastronomy schtick and had a powdered olive oil or coconut oil, e.g., that is how it is ...


3

I usually add vegetable shortening to my frosting recipe so that it doesn't melt easily. I live in India and it's hot in here for crying out loud. Another helpful tip is to add 2 tsp Meringue powder to your each icing batch, that tends to avoid the weepy icing. Hope this helps. (Source: Years of commercial bakery experience and my fair lot of sad weepy ...


3

Many frostings incorporate more than butter as the fat in the icing. I recently made ones using shortening, coconut butter, and coconut milk solids. These three are all fats that have higher melting points and are more reliable at higher temperatures in comparison to butter. If you wish to retain as much of the butter mouthfeel as possible, you might ...


3

Without taking away anything from the previous answers, I want to add one more reference: Kenji Alt's article on making a perfectly smooth cheese sauce. He describes the science in great detail, as well as providing lots of documentation of his various experiments. His final recipe comes down to a simple methodology: Toss the real cheese, shredded, with ...


3

Working with chocolate is so tricky! Introducing even a tiny amount of water to melted chocolate will cause it to seize. The water could come from unexpected places: steam from a double boiler, condensation on the interior of a lid, the use of a wet utensil. Seized chocolate can be returned to a smooth, melty texture, but it will no longer be suitable for ...


2

You can prevent prevent cheese from separating as it heats by adding sodium citrate to the recipe. Sodium citrate is the same ingredient used as the binder in processed cheese and wine-based cheese recipes. I bought a bag from Amazon that will last me a lifetime: http://www.amazon.com/Sodium-Citrate-Non-GMO-Molecular-Gastronomy/dp/B00BLPNM62/ref=sr_1_2?ie=...


2

Acidity level determines whether it will melt. Has nothing to do with moisture levels, fat etc. If your cheese wont melt it is either a very low acid fresh type cheese, or something went horribly wrong when it was made (cheddar for example, should always melt...if it doesnt, then something is wrong with the cheese when it was made).


2

Try sprinkling cornstarch over them. Lollipops usually get stuck because of humidity, and the cornstarch would absorbe that humidity.


2

Not all the fat in beef (and generally, in any kind of meat) is the same. Any piece of meat will have a certain amount of marbling fat, which is intramuscular and is hard to remove, intermuscular fat and subcutaneous fat, which can be trimmed off. From your picture, it seems to me that the fat covering the outer layer of the beef chunks is gristle, which ...


2

I recently had a similar problem, and I would guess that your solution will be similar as well. As in my case your recipe fails to be specific regarding too what temperature to elevate your mixture. To solve this you will need a candy thermometer. (In the US these are available at most stores that carry kitchen implements (Wal-xxx, Tarxx, etc.) The peek ...


2

Do you mean that you made salted caramel today or melted it into a sauce? If you mean made it, keep it loosely covered in a cool, very dry place, not the fridge. Moisture is the enemy of caramel and if it's salted, the salt will attract even more moisture. Or, you can wrap them really well and freeze them. If it is a melted, salted caramel sauce, just ...


2

If it's got milk or cream in it, then refrigerate it. Otherwise pure sugar and salt doesn't really spoil. As a general rule dryer goods take longer to spoil, and fat/oil is very difficult to spoil.


2

Fudge is candy. Like all candy making it is built on a concentrated sugar syrup. Fudge is differentiated from other candy in that it is encouraged to form tiny crystals and is high in fat. The chocolate in fudge provides two things: flavor and fat. Although less traditional, plenty of recipes for fudge variants leave out the chocolate altogether. As @...


1

While I am not certain if any of these ingredients were in the brand of cheese you bought, I figured you may be interested to hear that according to Heston Blumenthal there is two ingredients, in addition to cheese, you need to make a good fondue. One is acid, which will keep the protein from "clumping together", in the recipe I saw he used a bit of white ...



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