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6

The magic is from Sodium Citrate Most mass produced cheese it based on "cheddar blends". Basically large (50 Kg to 1 Mg) blocks of cheese are made in a milk factory. When a consumer product is to be made from it, the cheddar is shredded, flavour and/or culture is added, and then using heat and pressure it is re-packed into consumer sized packages In some ...


5

This is tricky because you don't really want the cheese to melt, you want it to become pliable enough to roll. When making fresh mozzarella, the curds are heated in 90 - 100 degree F water to make them pliable, then heated further (maybe 120 F) for stretching and folding. This is for fresh. I would assume factory produced mozzarella will behave slightly ...


3

Working with chocolate is so tricky! Introducing even a tiny amount of water to melted chocolate will cause it to seize. The water could come from unexpected places: steam from a double boiler, condensation on the interior of a lid, the use of a wet utensil. Seized chocolate can be returned to a smooth, melty texture, but it will no longer be suitable for ...


2

Fudge is candy. Like all candy making it is built on a concentrated sugar syrup. Fudge is differentiated from other candy in that it is encouraged to form tiny crystals and is high in fat. The chocolate in fudge provides two things: flavor and fat. Although less traditional, plenty of recipes for fudge variants leave out the chocolate altogether. As ...


2

If it's got milk or cream in it, then refrigerate it. Otherwise pure sugar and salt doesn't really spoil. As a general rule dryer goods take longer to spoil, and fat/oil is very difficult to spoil.


2

Do you mean that you made salted caramel today or melted it into a sauce? If you mean made it, keep it loosely covered in a cool, very dry place, not the fridge. Moisture is the enemy of caramel and if it's salted, the salt will attract even more moisture. Or, you can wrap them really well and freeze them. If it is a melted, salted caramel sauce, just ...


1

While I am not certain if any of these ingredients were in the brand of cheese you bought, I figured you may be interested to hear that according to Heston Blumenthal there is two ingredients, in addition to cheese, you need to make a good fondue. One is acid, which will keep the protein from "clumping together", in the recipe I saw he used a bit of white ...



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