Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

Ingredient substitution lists say you can use an equal volume of lemon juice or vinegar if you don't have cream of tartar. Most likely, the assumption has been that a baker will be more likely to have cream of tartar on hand than other acid sources due to the fact that it has multiple uses in the kitchen: Leavening Stabilization of egg whites Prevent ...


10

This is the nature of meringue: they will start to fall apart as soon as you stop whipping. There are a few tricks to help it hold longer, but in general you want to have EVERYTHING ready to go as soon as the meringue is whipped. To help stabilize the meringue you can: Use a copper or SILVER-plated bowl to whip, or add a tiny amount of powdered copper ...


6

First of all, I suggest reading through our other questions on meringues and general egg-beating, to rule out any issues with your technique regardless of sugar content: Beating Egg Whites with Granulated Sugar Added for Tapioca Pudding How to minimise sugar in meringue Why do my egg whites separate after whipping? Making my meringues form peaks How can I ...


5

Joy of Baking actually recommends using parchment or foil: ... it is a good idea to use parchment paper or aluminum foil to line your baking sheets, not wax paper, as the meringue will sometimes stick to wax paper. According to Living Strong: Next in line for substitutions similar to parchment paper comes aluminum foil. The flexibility of the ...


4

Meringue powder is a pasteurized egg product - "dried egg whites with stabilizers and anti-clumping agents such as cornstarch". It is used to stiffen recipes and I think there are two main reasons for using it (as opposed to egg whites): 1) Reduced risk of salmonella 2) Less time/labour/effort used - you don't have to beat the egg whites for a long time ...


4

Ironically, it could be precisely because you're trying to enjoy the meringue on a hot day that is causing it to deflate so quickly. Meringue are extremely sensitive to moisture, and a humid day can wreck your meringue's volume. It's best to make meringue on a dry day. However, there are a few things you can do to achieve better stability: Use fresher ...


4

The eggs whites in traditional meringues are used to spread the sugar into a thin foam that is then dried in the oven (or dehydrator) leaving behind the sugar structure and some proteins from the eggs. To make a meringue you need something that dissolves to tangle up with those proteins. I would guess that the beet meringues from Café Atlantico are made with ...


4

As far as I know, real Italian meringue don't really have to cook in a strict sense, they only need to dry out the water present in the white. For that to happen you should cook them at a very low temperature (something between 180-200 Fahrenheit) and keep the oven door slightly open, so that the moisture present in it could go away and they could dry ...


4

The secrets: (some are old wives tales, but hey, it's an old recipe) Eggs: Room temperature (you don't put eggs in the fridge do you?) and not fresh Contamination: Make sure everything you use to prepare the base is perfectly clean, especially no grease. Use boiling water to rinse everything first. Metal or glass bowls are best, as plastic is harder to get ...


4

The crusting is important so that any flowers or other intricate decorations will fix their shape and not slump when left out in warmer temperatures. (you don't want to refrigerate iced cakes, as when you remove them from the fridge, you'll get condensation). An icing that crusts quickly means that you can use an icing that's not quite as stiff for your ...


4

Acids allow more air to be beaten into a meringue. In order to make meringue, the proteins in egg white must be denatured. In their natural state, the proteins are curled up into tightly packed balls. When the egg is beaten, they uncoil into long strands. These strands then begin to coagulate, or join together, with the help of the sugar you add. The air ...


4

You want to be sure that the egg whites are fully whipped before you add pieces of anything (it's also best to incorporate sugar as either a syrup or very finely ground sugar once the eggs are already whipped as sugar can make the whipping take longer). When you incorporate pieces of anything into your meringue, be it nuts, candy, etc, fold it in gently ...


3

If the meringues are coming out of the oven sticky, you might lower the temperature slightly and extend the drying time (to avoid browning)--they should feel quite dry and very light coming out of the oven. Sugar is hydrophilic--if the air is humid, any condensation--even when you cannot see it--on the meringues will dissolve the sugar, and then they will ...


3

Both solutions will work. If you are making more mering, then make sure the thickness of the meringue layer in stays the same as for the small tin. If you scale the recipe correctly this happens automatically. I think your math is off though. The area of your 24 inch tin is only 1.77 times larger than the 18 inch pan. Assuming your pan is round: The area ...


3

Technically, the minimum ratio of sugar is zero. You can definitely create a stable meringue without any sugar at all, although you'll have to mind your conditions and preparation - use a spotlessly-clean bowl, room-temperature egg whites (separated when chilled), initially foamed up on low speed with an acid such as vinegar or cream of tartar, superfine ...


3

The easiest way to prevent meringue from weeping is by adding a teaspoon of cornstarch to the recipe, which will absorb the excess moisture that causes it. If you're a bit adventurous, you can also opt to sprinkle some cookie crumbs over your filling so when it weeps, the crumbs will absorb the moisture.


3

Piet Huysentruyt (a famous Belgian chef) advices to break and split your eggs, keep the egg whites in the fridge for a day or two, get them out and use them if they reach room temp. And yes, in meringue, moisture is your enemy! It can help you, if you bake the meringue, to put a wooden spoon between your oven door, so that the vaporized moist can escape ...


3

As there are multiple types of meringues, I imagine the core of this question is really the effect of acid on egg white foaming. According to KATERYNA LOMAKINA and KAMILA MÍKOVÁ writing in the Czeck Journal of Food Science, there is a moderately complex relationship between pH of the egg whites, and its foaming capacity (overrun) and the stability of the ...


2

I struggle with this same problem; if I omit the cream of tartar (or cornstarch), then it stays nice and fluffy, no falling. Of course, then I have the problem of it "weeping," as discussed here.


2

The reason they're supposed to be warm is that cold eggs tend to curdle, and de-emulsify. This is only really an issue if you're adding a bunch of fat (because otherwise you don't get an emulsion). They should also get a bit bigger, which may explain why they seem to shrink more when you fold things into them. You can always try adding a little cream of ...


2

Try this: separate the white from the yolk 3 or 4 days before you want to make meringue. Keep the white in an hermetic box in the fridge and take them out of the fridge one hour before you begin. So the egg white foam will be more stable. Another trick is to add some drops of lemon juice to the egg white right before you beat them.


2

A pavlova base is a meringue with cornstarch added. The addition of cornstarch makes a soft, marshmallow-y center. The Joy of Baking has what looks like a comprehensive recipe, although I haven't made it. I've always just made it with a normal meringue base and only just learned this was "wrong" (silly English heritage I guess) . If you want to use a ...


2

The only ingredients you add to a meringue before the stiff peak stage should be ingredients related to stabilizing the meringue itself - acid and maybe a little salt near the beginning, sugar during the transition from soft to stiff peaks, and starch or other stabilizer at the end of stiff peaks. It's also OK to whip in small quantities of things like ...


2

Actually, this can be done but it may not be convenient to do if you aren't in a restaurant setting where this can streamline your process. If you take equal parts egg whites and sugar, beat them together, cook at 74C for 30minutes and then transfer them to the siphon and charge with 4 cartridges, dispense to desired shape, and then bake at 150C until set ...


2

To add peppermint candy to meringue, you want to crush it into as reasonably fine a powder as possible to minimally disrupt the meringue. You don't need it as fine as flour, but you definitely don't want any chunks that wouldn't easily pass through a larger meshed sieve. After you get stiff peaks in your meringue, fold the crushed peppermint into the egg ...


1

According to the packaging from the Wilton brand royal and meringue frostings, the shelf life can be for up to three months if kept in a cool dry place in a sealed/air tight container. The egg products are labeled as pasturized. (I think the FDA requires whole protein products to be pasturized to be sold to the public, but I cant swear to it).


1

A meringue with nuts in it is called a "japonaise". If you search this, you will see many different recipes for a nutty meringue. All meringues are crunchy in the beginning but become moist when left out or filled, provided they are properly cooked in the beginning. I wouldn't worry about the texture as long as you use the meringues right away or store ...


1

I have made two separate meringue mixtures side by side: one with vinegar and one without. In my experience it makes no difference to the final outcome provided that you add the sugar really slowly (a tablespoon at a time) and not too early. If this is done correctly then there is no need to add an acid.


1

I recommend watching Egg Files VII - Good Eats. It is an entire episode on meringue. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TmIuFX3x_ik Important factors affecting the result: temperature amount of sugar how the sugar is incorporated Alton Brown explains how to make three types of meringue: french, italian, and, swiss. Here are a tidbits of info from that ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible