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34

Folding a burrito is serious business. Get it wrong and you'll end up dumping most of the contents all over the place and look like a burrito noob. Get it right and your hands and plate will be perfectly clean, and you'll no longer be hungry. Beware: publicly flaunting these skills might lead to people wanting you to fold their burritos for them. General ...


22

I finally found what I'm looking for, from the University of Michigan - some actual data on the subject! They say that rinsing canned beans can reduce the amount of sodium by half, and also reduces the amount of complex sugars which humans can't digest (but the bacteria in our intestines can, with uncomfortable results!) It appears that draining the fluid ...


17

Guacamole seems to go brown with exposure to air, as does avocado. While it will not solve the issue entirely, covering with cling wrap directly on the surface helps maintain color for an extended period. Rather than pulling the wrap tight across the top of a bowl / container, place the wrap directly on top of the guacamole. Use your hand to smooth out the ...


15

Depending on where you are, the word tortilla can mean a few different things. In Mexico it refers to a flatbread made of either wheat or corn and a few other ingredients. These flatbreads tend to come in standard sizes in the United States at least, one of which might be labeled the "burrito" size. A burrito is one use for a tortilla. A burrito consists ...


15

You need to warm them up a bit. There are a number of ways to do this - 20 or 30 seconds on a griddle (or a comal is you have one), wrap a stack in foil and place in 325 oven for until warm, wrap a stack in a clean towel and steam them using a steamer, or slightly moisten a towel and wrap it around a stack and microwave them for a bit, etc etc. If you've ...


12

Authentic flour tortillas use lard. For an authentic taste, use that, or consider using shortening or butter since they are solid at room temperature like lard. You also might want to consider increasing the fat in your recipe. Fat will coat the proteins of your flour and keep the gluten network from forming so easily. I was also taught when making ...


12

No mold required! Simply heat about an inch of oil in a frying pan (less oil if you're making less shells - this is enough for about a dozen), then cook small, flat corn tortillas one at a time. Cook for about 15 seconds on each side. Once you see bubbles on the tortilla, you're all done if you like soft shells. If you like more crispy shells, go ahead ...


11

Cut the tomato in half at the midsection or equator (stem end being the "north pole") to expose the seed cavities. Holding the cut side down over your garbage bowl or trash can, gently squeeze to remove the seeds. You can easily pry out stubborn seeds with your fingertips. Place the tomato half cut-side up on the cutting board (Cutting waxy skinned ...


10

Genuine fajitas are made with skirt steak. The most important thing you can do when making fajitas is marinate appropriately. That recipe calls for a dismally short marination time (30 mins to an hour). When I make fajitas I marinate them a minimum of 4 hours, though typically overnight. I usually use a combination of soy sauce, lime juice, garlic, olive oil ...


9

Potatoes are very popular in some parts of Mexico. When I lived in Guadalajara, potato tacos were common, usually deep-fried. Diced (and possibly pre-cooked) potatoes with some seasoning added to a soft taco shell, then the entire thing fried together until crispy. After frying, such tacos (whether with potatoes or other filling) were cracked open to add ...


8

Penzeys (a spice co.) makes theirs from: salt, black pepper, paprika, Turkish oregano, cayenne pepper, garlic, celery, Mexican oregano, basil, nutmeg, cumin, marjoram, thyme and rosemary. No numbers are given, and you probably don't need two kinds of oregano, but I've made it before with a similar list, and it is generally insensitive to precise ratios. ...


8

What is it with tomatoes and their seeds? As Papin says, the "pulp" which is inside a tomato adds "umami" taste to dishes, or at least a good taste. Why would anyone using tomatoes wish to remove the best tasting parts of the veg? I find the peel and de-seed tomatoes to be time-consuming and wasteful of the good parts of the tomato and my time, which I ...


8

Two things: (1) Pass the tortillas through hot oil first, for just a few seconds. That will soften them and also "waterproof" them. It is the traditional technique. (2) Consider making them on a griddle instead of in the oven; preheat the sauce and the filling, soften the tortilla, fill, heat for just a few more seconds, place on top of the sauce on a ...


8

Usually when I've made them I just put sauce on top, not on the bottom, and just down the middle so the edges are exposed. And I make the sauce on the thick side so it is not too watery. I bake them in the oven too, and they are never too soggy, but you could just grill to minimise the sauce absorption. I've heard that corn tortillas are more resistant ...


8

Standard prep for beef tongue seems to be: scrub it well and rinse, then soak it in cold water for 2-3 hours. Heat water to a low simmer (about 200F) and cook slowly for at least an hour per pound. Preferably cook as long as you can (5-6 hours) to get a more tender result. When meat is tender and cooked, remove meat and save the broth. Cool the tongue and ...


8

While wild potatoes do exist throughout the Americas, they were domesticated in South America, perhaps in what's now Peru. They were a staple in the Incan empire (also in that area), and still are in modern Peru. They grow best in cool, moist areas like those parts of the Andes, so it's not surprising that they never became commonly used in hotter parts of ...


8

If possible, don't buy your tortillas from a modern super market, but look for a source of homemade/fresh tortillas. These can be found in many cities in the U.S. at Mexican or Latin American stores or neighboroods. Perhaps check your yellow pages for "Tortilleria" (The spanish word for "Tortilla Store"). These tortillas will also taste much better (at ...


8

You probably want to just use already-cooked beans, from a can. (Hope there's a store nearby.) Then you just have to cook as long as it takes to let the flavors mingle; half an hour is plenty. If you happen to have a pressure cooker, you can cook dried beans much faster, something like 20-30 minutes. See for example this recipe - you can add back in ...


7

Recipes As far as salsa recipes go, they're all over the web. Check sites like allrecipes.com or epicurious.com - - or justrightmenus.com! Shelf Life Refrigerator. With regard to shelf life, according to stilltasty.com, you're only going to get 5-7 days out of fresh salsa in the refrigerator. Freezer. The same source says you can keep it for 1-2 ...


7

You might be able to counter-balance it with other flavors (salt, sour, sweet, hot), but you're likely still going to have some bitter notes come through, it's just a question if it's tolerable or not, and some people dislike bitter more than others. (I can't understand how people can drink beers other than lambics) In looking at a similar thread on ...


7

That sounds like a standard queso cheese (typically found on your chimis etc.) If you are looking for a terrific queso recipe, there are myriad. However, two tips for any queso: seek out "Chihuahua Cheese" (its a mild white that melts very smoothly and has a subtle flavor) pepper and cumin and paprika roasted first are your friends, but if you add more ...


7

We call those sandwiches guajolotes [*]; they are specific to to Tulancingo. One of the typical foods of the Tulancingo region are los guajolotes: buns (similar to a white bread baguette) are halved, filled with refried beans, cheese enchiladas, onions, and salsa. Guajolotes may also sometimes include meat, such as: shredded chicken, ham, sausage, or ...


7

They're commonly called squash blossoms in English - as you might guess, this is because it doesn't matter too much what kind of squash they're from. They'll most commonly be from smaller summer squash plants (e.g. zucchini) though, since they produce many small squash instead of a few large squash (like pumpkins), so you can get more blossoms for your ...


6

They may be too thick. You can try placing several pieces of paper or thin cardboard into your tortilla press to get thinner tortillas. (If you aren't already using plastic or wax paper to press the tortillas, then you'll have to start, so that the paper doesn't stick to the tortilla.) Experiment with several different thicknesses until the cooking is more ...


6

I have made refried beans out of pinto, small red, black, and even navy beans. I almost tried using kidney beans once but it seemed wasteful. They were all different in texture but they were all good. Black beans, for example, have a much more fibrous skin so the refried beans are not as smooth- I actually prefer it to the homogeneous pinto mash. Obviously ...


5

The heightened flavor of refried beans (over regular beans) comes from two components: the extra fat, and the Maillard (browning) reactions caused by the cooked beans shallow-frying in hot fat. Effectively, a crust forms where the mashed beans contact the fat. This crust breaks up later when the dish is stirred together. If you can get them, try pinto beans ...


5

I wouldn't trust any store brand to omit seeds entirely; it's just not going to be a priority for them. I'd suggest making your own instead. It's fairly easy and fast to seed tomatoes using a chinois, and to seed peppers using a knife. And it'll taste better, too! BTW, many online medical authorities seem to think that seeds are not actually an issue ...


5

Taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco_burrito Two key technologies that made the San Francisco burrito possible are the large flour tortilla and tortilla steamers, which together increase the flexibility, stretch, and size of the resulting tortilla. The tortilla steamer saturates the gluten-heavy tortilla with moisture and heat, ...


5

The Pico de Gallo I make (plum tomatoes, white onion, fresh jalapeno peppers, lime juice, a tiny bit of olive oil and chopped fresh cilantro, salt and pepper) will last approximately 1 week if kept in a sealed container in the refrigerator. Over that time the tomatoes will get a little mushy and the cilantro will wilt. Perhaps you can have everything else ...



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