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29

Aw, you youngsters, spoiled with your Nestle Quick... :) To mix cocoa powder with a liquid (or really, to mix any powder with a liquid - salt and granulated sugar aren't powders), you need to make a slurry by mixing a small part of the liquid into all of the powder. Then you can dilute the slurry with the rest of the liquid. Note that if you're using sugar ...


17

To make sweetened condensed milk: The best make-your-own version is to mix 1 cup of evaporated milk with 1-1/4 cups of sugar in a saucepan, heat and stir until the sugar is completely dissolved, and let cool. If you don't have evaporated milk on hand either, you can make your own by slowly simmering any quantity of milk in a pan until ...


16

There is a lot of variability in how fast milk will go bad. How long the milk has been opened Pasteurized vs ultra-pasteurized Temperature the milk is kept at Thermal cycling: how long and how often is it kept above 40º Where in the fridge it is kept. The door will have more thermal cycling than a shelf, higher shelves tend to be warmer than lower ones. ...


15

Worked fine for us; we used to cottage with people who didn't want to shop very often, had lots of kids and a big freezer out back. We would buy lots of milk and freeze it just fine. Do let it defrost completely before trying to use it. We never noticed any separation, nor problems with expansion - do be aware of the container the milk is actually in, and ...


15

I think this question would be more suited for Biology beta, but since it's here, I'll try to keep the answer as lay as possible. Albumin, like you read on Wikipedia, is a large group of proteins, which are present in all kinds of organisms, including your own blood. (Actually, albumin in your blood has a very important function - it binds small molecules, ...


14

No. Sweetened condensed milk has a 40% sugar content. It is very sweet, suitable for desserts and such. It is entirely too sweet to substituted into a curry. The consistency is drastically different. Evaporated milk is about the same consistency as heavy cream. Sweetened condensed milk, because of its high sugar content, is more the consistency of a warm ...


13

You could do it the same way that you make chocolate syrup: Heat some water to boiling, dissovle the cocoa and sweetener and reduce down till it reaches the consistancy that you desire. This will result in a syrup that will mix in to cold or hot drinks with no problem and can also be used to top ice cream and or other desserts.


12

I was sure that with all the questions and answers we have had about yogurt that this simple question must surely have already been asked. But I couldn't find it. Making yogurt is simplicity itself. The goal is to introduce heat-loving (thermophillic) bacteria to milk, keep them warm so that they munch on the lactose in the milk turning it into lactic ...


11

Buttermilk is already thoroughly packed with live bacteria. During its manufacture, that bacteria already consumed some portion of the available lactose and turned it into lactic acid. Because of the lack of food, acidity, and the extreme competition it is pretty hard for buttermilk to go bad. The good bacteria will stay active and the buttermilk will get ...


11

I don't think anything will be wrong with that milk. If it's fresh milk, which I doubt, you should consume it in less than three days. If it's pasteurized milk, which is much more likely, it'll be unaffected. Signs of spoilage are a sour smell and sour taste. You should make a habit of always smelling your milk (food) before drinking (eating) it. If it ...


11

I am skeptical that butter from yogurt is a thing. When yogurt is made the milk proteins denature and form a mesh that traps all the large molecules in the milk. Water, sugar, and some small molecules can come out but the fat never does- it's huge and tightly bound up in the gel. Even when yogurt is blended up the whey will separate out but the fat never ...


10

If you've found a very old recipe that calls for scalding for food safety reasons, then yes, it is probably unnecessary. However, there are places where it is called for. In particular, when making Béchamel (which is made by combining milk and roux), it is important to scald or at least warm the milk, otherwise you can and most likely will end up with ...


10

Green vegetables are a good source of calcium, in particular, artichokes, broccoli, and greens (like turnip greens). Other sources of dietary calcium include sardines, canned salmon, raisins, almonds, sesame seeds, and soy beans. ETA: The daily recommended intake of calcium for an adult is 500-1000 mg. If you're curious about how much calcium a particular ...


10

Absolutely. We always buy twice as much as we need and freeze the extra. Open the milk and pour out a couple cups to make sure it doesn't burst when it freezes. Then just leave it in the fridge for a day to thaw before you need it. The milk is translucent/yellow when it is frozen but after it is thawed I can't detect a difference in it. I haven't tried ...


10

I think I found the exact answer somewhere on the net. From my experience, I know frequent stirring and also adding cold milk when it cools down will prevent it. Also, I notice this also happens for soy milk and the layer from soy milk is used to create lots of different soy products http://www.wisegeek.com/why-does-milk-form-a-skin-when-it-is-heated.htm ...


10

When metal is exposed to microwave radiation, an electric potential difference can develop as the microwaves generate electric charge in parts of the metal. Flowing electricity can cause sparks as electrons migrate to places of lower potential. Solid metal is susceptible to this because its electrons are relatively loose, making it a good conductor of ...


10

No, there is no reason they should. Bacteria feed on carbohydrates, not on fats. (This is why oil doesn't spoil outside of the fridge - it is pure fat). So it is the amount of milk sugar which is important for the bacteria, and it is the same regardless of the fat content. Also, the spoiled milk is not more or less sour at the end. The other important ...


10

Soaking chicken in milk or buttermilk in the refrigerator overnight is a common practice when making Southern-style fried chicken. This practice supposedly tenderizes the chicken through the actions of enzymes naturally present in the milk. Yoghurt is used in a similar way in many Middle Eastern and southern Asian food ways. The milk can be used alone, ...


10

Boil the milk on its own in a clean/rinsed container (microwave). If it curdles, it's the milk. Otherwise either there is a decalcifying agent in the kettle or something in the coffeee is making it too acidic. It takes very little, after decalcification, we usually have to pass about a gallon of water through the coffee machine before the steam wand ...


10

If you take your coffee sweet, ice cream works wonders, and it lasts in the freezer. Chocolate is my favorite. I recommend melting it before adding the coffee. This makes sense because ice cream is mostly milk and cream, with some flavorings--usually of higher quality than are in artificial coffee creamers. I should add the trick I used in the dorms ...


9

According to this product page from Machine Point: MachinePoint Food Technologies manufactures injection direct heating systems where high pressure steam is injected into pre-heated liquid by a steam injector leading to a rapid rise in temperature between 80 and 145 ºC for 0,5 seconds. Following the product is flash-cooled in a vacuum to remove ...


9

When making lactose free milk, the lactose isn't actually removed. Instead, lactase is added to the milk. This breaks down the lactose into its component sugars, glucose and galactose. Lactose is one of the least sweet sugars, relative to sucrose (table sugar). Both glucose and galactose are significantly sweeter than the original lactose, hence why lactose ...


8

The short answer is yes; the longer answer depends on what kind of soy milk you're buying and how you plan to use it. I've used soy milk in my breads and cakes without noticing much of a difference in texture, but I use the unflavored, unsweetened versions of it (especially in cake-baking, as many recipes call for vanilla and some soy milks have vanilla in ...


8

Milk curdles due to acidity, so if you can raise the pH of the soup by adding something basic, it would help, although it could affect flavor. The other thing to try is heating the milk to ~90 degrees C before adding it to the soup. This will cause the protein in the milk to change in a way that curdling won't result in as bad a final result--it may in ...


8

First, you don't specify if you mean cream of coconut, or coconut milk. I think coconut milk would be the thing to try here, as it has less fat. Second, if it works, it won't be bechamel any more. But this is a technical detail: if it is tasty to you, you should be able to use it as a substitution practically everywhere. Third, does it work? I haven't ...


8

The process of pasteurizing milk is to treat it with heat to kill microorganisms such as Brucella, Campylobacter, E. coli O157:H7, Listeria, Mycobacterium bovis, Salmonella, and Yersinia that may or may not be in the milk. This is a precautionary step that is taken when you are not 100% sure whether your source of milk is disease free. Pasteurization can ...


8

This is not yogurt per definition, you are making a fresh cheese. You can actually use other types of milk for such a cheese, but the mouthfeel and taste will be very different and won't be as similar to yogurt. There is a large class of acid-curdled cheeses, including paneer, tvorog, quark and many others. I don't know if yours has a specific name. I know ...


8

According to Wikipedia, buffalo milk has 8% milkfat by weight. Cow's milk is listed on that same table as 3.9%, so I'll use that figure for consistency, though the number does vary both from cow to cow and by breed. So, you need to figure out the portions in which you'd mix together whole milk and heavy cream to reach the same fat content as your buffalo ...


7

I've used a french press with good success when a steam wand was not available. Pour some warm milk in and froth away. You're not going to get the same shimmery-silky texture that a steam wand will do, but it'll be pretty decent. The combination of a wide surface area and lots of small holes is excellent for introducing lots of air into the milk and ...


7

Wikipedia has also other uses for Scalded milk besides killing bacteria: Uses Scalded milk is called for in the original recipes for béchamel sauce, to prevent the sauce from thickening excessively. Since these early recipes predate pasteurization, this was a necessary step. Scalded milk is used in bread to make a more tender loaf. Scalded milk is used in ...



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