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14

It's normal whole milk. 'sweet' was used to distinguish it from buttermilk in older cookbooks.


11

I am skeptical that butter from yogurt is a thing. When yogurt is made the milk proteins denature and form a mesh that traps all the large molecules in the milk. Water, sugar, and some small molecules can come out but the fat never does- it's huge and tightly bound up in the gel. Even when yogurt is blended up the whey will separate out but the fat never ...


9

When making lactose free milk, the lactose isn't actually removed. Instead, lactase is added to the milk. This breaks down the lactose into its component sugars, glucose and galactose. Lactose is one of the least sweet sugars, relative to sucrose (table sugar). Both glucose and galactose are significantly sweeter than the original lactose, hence why lactose ...


6

Yes, this is possible. From my childhood experience, oats were always cooked in milk, never in water. I can't tell you specifics of how to do it, because it was my mother and grandmothers who made them. But based on the behavior of other grains cooked in milk, from complete kernels to flours, I don't think that you need to make any changes as compared to ...


5

Cows, goat, soy, almond, and coconut milk have around the same carbohydrate levels, so there is not enough difference to make the effort to rework recipes etc. Also coconut milk has more than 20% fat compared to milk having 1% to 5%. A normal human body can convert fats to sugars very efficiently (around 70%), so total energy of coconut milk will be very ...


5

Yes, you can entirely replace water with milk. The main thing to be aware of is how prone it is to boiling over. Milk will eagerly do that on its own, and starchy water will too, so the combination has to be cooked on very low heat to avoid making a huge mess. (I think this is why the original recipe starts with water: less time with potential for boiling ...


5

Is half a gallon of milk that you may not need to throw out worth getting food poisoning over? If I had to choose between possible bloody diarrhea, vomiting, severe pain, seizures and possibly even death and spending a few more dollars, I certainly would spend a few more dollars. Throw the stuff away. If it's gone sour, you have a lively colony of bacteria ...


4

Adding milk works because milk is mostly water. It might even work better, as it also contains sugar (lactose) which will be eaten by your starter's yeasts and bacteria. But it also contains other stuff, such as fats. And fats, after some time, get rancid. You probably won't want that taste in bread or pancakes. I would stick to water (which quite probably ...


4

It's not the sugar that caused the milk to curdle, it's the milk itself. Dulce de leche and caramel are both usually made with either cream, condensed, or evaporated milk. The issue with regular milk (especially skim), is that it has such a high water content and low fat content. The fat in cream buffers the protein, helping to prevent curdling, and the ...


4

As you see from the variety of advise from reputable sources, many combinations of hot/cold roux and liquid will work. From a convenience point of view, you want at least one of them hot in order to speed the integration. If you started both of them cold, it would probably work but take a while to warm up to melt the butter in the roux, and free the flour ...


3

The bigger number is probably (but not necessarily) colder; as others have said the manual is the easiest way to find out. Of course, if your only problem is the milk going off too fast, and it's a good temperature for the rest of the stuff, you might want to just put the milk in a colder part of the fridge. Near the vents is much colder than the door, and ...


3

The best butter is made from yoghurt. Besides you get a bonus which is ayran (watery yogurt). Making butter from milk is easy as told. But not tasty because the fat has milk taste. When you extract it from yogurt the butter has its pure taste. İ am from turkey and all the butter in the villages of turkey are made from yogurt. Shelf-stable products in ...


3

You're not going to be able to get cream from evaporated milk because it has been processed to either separate or homogenize the milk fats. As for using it in recipes, you frequently can use evaporated milk in place of cream. The concentration of milk protein mimics the extra fat of cream in some ways. In general, you should be able to sub it 1:1, but the ...


3

The one time I made mozzarella, I used this recipe. As I understand it, the key is (a) citric acid, and (b) kneading (that's what gives it the stringy texture). It turned out pretty well, but it didn't keep long at all.


3

No, there is nothing about raising otherwise-safe milk rapidly to a high temperature that is going to make you sick. Unless you are already lactose intolerant or otherwise allergic to milk. Raising milk rapidly to a temperature above the danger zone (140 F / 60 C) is going to make it safer, not less safe.


3

Looking at the ingredients for Nesquick for example: SUGAR COCOA PROCESSED WITH ALKALI SOY LECITHIN CARRAGEENAN SALT ARTIFICIAL FLAVORS SPICE VITAMINS AND MINERALS: CALCIUM CARBONATE, ASCORBIC ACID (VITAMIN C), ZINC OXIDE, PYRIDOXINE HYDROCHLORIDE (VITAMIN B6), COPPER GLUCONATE, MANGANESE SULFATE, BIOTIN. The key elements are soy lecithin, which is an ...


3

Unless you are using a canning method that is actually designed for long term storage and shelf stability, you cannot assume the food is sterilized or pasteurized by home processing methods. You should therefore not expect a refrigerated shelf life of more than 2-3 days, the same as if you had not processed it. Finally, you are creating a low acid food ...


3

Assuming both have been pasteurized, the nutritional value is the same...You're certainly not going to be drinking milk at pasteurization temperatures. For raw milk, you have to weigh the risks of bacterial contamination. It's rare, but it can be exceedingly nasty.


3

The problem you are facing is that your microwave temperature is too high and boils your milk too rapidly. The microwave does not heat food evenly and boils the milk too fast. Milk shouldn't be boiled too rapidly and doing this causes the casein in it to clump together and that curdles the milk. It should instead be brought 'to a boil' by heating on a slow ...


3

Some jalebi can be dusted with citric acid to add tartness, but it really depends on the recipe. Jalebi itself isn't more than wheat and sugar, so chances are you're in the clear.


3

The Ozeri Deluxe milk frother claims an rpm of 15000 rpm http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BISKPMG/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00BISKPMG&linkCode=as2&tag=nmjv-20 However I have seen in ikea (and pound / dollar stores) a much cheaper option that to me seems much the same ...


2

Hard cheese usually uses rennet, and a mechanical cheese press to extract as much whey as possible, and usually a long aging (drying) time to make it hard. I think there may be a discrepancy between the original poster's definition of "hard" cheese and what is generally known as hard cheese like Grana Padano, Cheddar, and others. The process the OP is ...


2

My son and I did this for science fair project. We left milk in a glass out at room temp . Day 1 whole milk and 2% was about the same. On day 2 the whole milk had a very slight odor and a slight film over top of glass. The 2% had a stronger odor and had seperated it had an inch of curds on top and inch of liquid on bottom.


2

Even if you produce your own evaporated milk, it is highly unlikely to help you in separating the cream, because it is only reducing the water phase of milk; it doesn't change the fat phase. Nothing in this process makes the cream easier to separate from the water phase. You may be able to use the reduced product in some recipes where cream is called ...


2

I'm not quite sure what your goal is, but the standard recipe for porridge which I grew up with is 1 cup of oats to 2 cups of milk, stirring frequently to avoid burning. It takes about 5 to 10 minutes to cook, and is done when it starts bubbling. The result is usually already fairly thick, and it thickens as it cools.


2

Per Still Tasty, well refrigerated, milk should last about 5-7 days. Note that this almost certainly assumes that the milk has been pasteurized. It is theoretically possible that you could periodically reboil milk, and then try to get it cooled to refrigerator temperatures rapidly, to increase its life. I suspect that the benefit would not justify the ...


2

Read the manual. If you don't have a manual, buy an inexpensive refrigerator thermometer. Measure the temperature, then adjust by about, say, two settings, and 24 hours later, read the thermometer again. Whichever direction it changed, you will know which way the settings go. You will then know which way to adjust, and be able to target your ideal ...


2

Technically no, it is not the same thing. Sweetened condensed milk has a very high sugar content, something like 40%, while just condensed milk has no sugar at all. But this still doesn't tell us what the recipe author meant. The availability of different types of condensed and evaporated milks seem to differ a lot in different parts of the world. This ...


2

Sweetened condensed milk is approximately 40% sugar, so you would need not quite double the sweetened condensed milk, and you would have to deduct the additional sugar from the recipe. You would need to multiply the amount of milk by about 1.7 to get the amount of sweetened condensed milk, and then deduct 40% of that (by weight) from the sugar in your ...


2

I haven't used goat milk in my baking because I don't like the taste of goats milk. I suspect it would be a good idea for you to taste goats milk first to see if you like it if you haven't already. Other than that, there's no reason to not use it. As far as fat content goes, I only use full-fat dairy in my bread. No adjustments to the recipe are needed.



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