Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

I am skeptical that butter from yogurt is a thing. When yogurt is made the milk proteins denature and form a mesh that traps all the large molecules in the milk. Water, sugar, and some small molecules can come out but the fat never does- it's huge and tightly bound up in the gel. Even when yogurt is blended up the whey will separate out but the fat never ...


9

When making lactose free milk, the lactose isn't actually removed. Instead, lactase is added to the milk. This breaks down the lactose into its component sugars, glucose and galactose. Lactose is one of the least sweet sugars, relative to sucrose (table sugar). Both glucose and galactose are significantly sweeter than the original lactose, hence why lactose ...


7

The use of vinegar in the cheese production is irrelevant. Cheese made with the acid from vinegar or cheese made with the acid from a bacterial culture should be similar. The difference is in how high the milk was heated when the cheese was made. The albumin in milk denatures and precipitates at about boiling temperatures. If the milk was boiled before the ...


6

Evidently, there are some recipes for frozen confections based on oat milk. For example, Dia Designs provides "5 vegan ice creams", most of which are based on oat milk. They read more like sorbet recipes, due to the lack of fat in the mix. If you were to try to create your own oat milk based frozen dessert recipes, I would suggest modifying a base sorbet ...


6

Yes, you can. And it is not too easy. Microfoam has small bubbles by definition and the panarello wand will draw a 'certain' amount of air and you can't really control that part. The notes below might help you get there. I have successfully done this with the panarello wands of automatic Saeco machines which aren't too different from deLonghi. Run your ...


6

This site explains two methods of making whipping cream from milk. The first is by manipulating store-bought milk, by adding gelatin, temperature and a lot of stirring. The second is by separating the cream out of raw milk. The site claims that the result of both methods can be used for whipped cream. A third method I sometimes use when a recipe asks for a ...


6

Yes, this is possible. From my childhood experience, oats were always cooked in milk, never in water. I can't tell you specifics of how to do it, because it was my mother and grandmothers who made them. But based on the behavior of other grains cooked in milk, from complete kernels to flours, I don't think that you need to make any changes as compared to ...


5

Cream does last quite a while in the fridge, especially before it's opened - it has a pretty high fat content. So you may be able to buy it when you can, and still have it around when you want it. Failing that, honestly, I think that anything you can do with milk and additives is probably not going to be nearly as good as actual whipped cream, so you might ...


5

Cows, goat, soy, almond, and coconut milk have around the same carbohydrate levels, so there is not enough difference to make the effort to rework recipes etc. Also coconut milk has more than 20% fat compared to milk having 1% to 5%. A normal human body can convert fats to sugars very efficiently (around 70%), so total energy of coconut milk will be very ...


5

Significant loss of nutrients during pasteurization is simply a myth. According to the National Council Against Health Fraud, the loss of nutrients when pasteurizing milk is very small. Most nutrients are unaffected. There is approximately a 10-20% loss of vitamin C, 10% loss of thiamin, and 0-10% loss of vitamin B12. See the linked article to get their ...


5

Yes, you can entirely replace water with milk. The main thing to be aware of is how prone it is to boiling over. Milk will eagerly do that on its own, and starchy water will too, so the combination has to be cooked on very low heat to avoid making a huge mess. (I think this is why the original recipe starts with water: less time with potential for boiling ...


4

From the description of how this beverage is made, it is not fermented. Four hours, at refrigerator temperature, and without any inoculation from an active bacterial culture simply will not cause any significant amount of fermentation. Instead, what is happening is that the enzyme bromelin and acid present in pineapple is curdling the milk proteins, ...


4

So long as we are discussing this topic. The Center for Disease Control has a specific answer for your question and their answer is NO. However, According to this paper from the National Center for Biotechnology Information pasteurization causes a breakdown in milk-caesin protein which after uptake through Peyer's patch can promote allergic sensitivity. ...


4

Even if it is possible, it is a very, very bad idea as you don't know what cultures or pathogens are in the already spoiled milk. Fermented dairy products should only be made from fresh milk in good condition—and in most cases, that milk should be pasteurized while fresh absolutely as soon as possible from the source cows.


4

I don't think this is practically possible with lemon juice, as milk protein will curdle in the presence of acid (in this case, citric acid in the lemon juice)—and the process happens much more quickly at hotter temperatures, as in tea. A pinch of salt may slow the process, but is likely to be unpalatable. You could neutralize the acid with baking ...


4

It's not the sugar that caused the milk to curdle, it's the milk itself. Dulce de leche and caramel are both usually made with either cream, condensed, or evaporated milk. The issue with regular milk (especially skim), is that it has such a high water content and low fat content. The fat in cream buffers the protein, helping to prevent curdling, and the ...


4

Adding milk works because milk is mostly water. It might even work better, as it also contains sugar (lactose) which will be eaten by your starter's yeasts and bacteria. But it also contains other stuff, such as fats. And fats, after some time, get rancid. You probably won't want that taste in bread or pancakes. I would stick to water (which quite probably ...


4

As you see from the variety of advise from reputable sources, many combinations of hot/cold roux and liquid will work. From a convenience point of view, you want at least one of them hot in order to speed the integration. If you started both of them cold, it would probably work but take a while to warm up to melt the butter in the roux, and free the flour ...


4

Is half a gallon of milk that you may not need to throw out worth getting food poisoning over? If I had to choose between possible bloody diarrhea, vomiting, severe pain, seizures and possibly even death and spending a few more dollars, I certainly would spend a few more dollars. Throw the stuff away. If it's gone sour, you have a lively colony of bacteria ...


3

You're not going to be able to get cream from evaporated milk because it has been processed to either separate or homogenize the milk fats. As for using it in recipes, you frequently can use evaporated milk in place of cream. The concentration of milk protein mimics the extra fat of cream in some ways. In general, you should be able to sub it 1:1, but the ...


3

Are these bacteria also present in sterilized milk? If something is sterile, then by definition it does not have any live bacteria in it. That only applies while the milk is sealed in its original sterile container, though. Can these bacteria be introduced from the air or from the bread [flour]? Absolutely. There are bacteria and yeast living in ...


3

Look at it this way: What happens if you boil it, and what happens if you don't? If you boil, you reduce the risk of getting food poisoning. If you don't boil, you reduce the risk of getting malnourished. Now, if the temperature-sensitive nutrients in milk are all that stands between a healthy you and a malnourished you, then you are doing something ...


3

It is a common misconception that the shelf life of a cooked food (= mix of ingredients) is the same as the shelf life of the shortest-lived ingredient. I cannot stress enough how wrong this assumption is. As with any cooked food, the shelf life of hot chocolate should be about 3 to 5 days in the fridge, with a cumulative stay in the danger zone of no ...


3

As nobody seems to have a good source to official information beyond Mando's FDA link, I will tell you of my experience. In Balkan villages where cows are held in traditional ways and not inspected by veterinarians, the accepted wisdom is that the milk has to be boiled on the day it is bought, and drunk within the next 2 or 3 days. The boiling itself is ...


3

The best butter is made from yoghurt. Besides you get a bonus which is ayran (watery yogurt). Making butter from milk is easy as told. But not tasty because the fat has milk taste. When you extract it from yogurt the butter has its pure taste. İ am from turkey and all the butter in the villages of turkey are made from yogurt. Shelf-stable products in ...


3

The bigger number is probably (but not necessarily) colder; as others have said the manual is the easiest way to find out. Of course, if your only problem is the milk going off too fast, and it's a good temperature for the rest of the stuff, you might want to just put the milk in a colder part of the fridge. Near the vents is much colder than the door, and ...


3

The one time I made mozzarella, I used this recipe. As I understand it, the key is (a) citric acid, and (b) kneading (that's what gives it the stringy texture). It turned out pretty well, but it didn't keep long at all.


3

No, there is nothing about raising otherwise-safe milk rapidly to a high temperature that is going to make you sick. Unless you are already lactose intolerant or otherwise allergic to milk. Raising milk rapidly to a temperature above the danger zone (140 F / 60 C) is going to make it safer, not less safe.


3

Unless you are using a canning method that is actually designed for long term storage and shelf stability, you cannot assume the food is sterilized or pasteurized by home processing methods. You should therefore not expect a refrigerated shelf life of more than 2-3 days, the same as if you had not processed it. Finally, you are creating a low acid food ...


2

A good substitute is unsalted butter (pasture raised is best). Brew the coffee, and with a blender blend 2 tables spoons (or less or more dependign on your tastes) of the butter into the coffee until you get a nice foam. I have been drinking what's called bulletproof coffee. It's coffee blended with unsalted butter and mct oil (i've been using coconut oil ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible