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16

It's normal whole milk. 'sweet' was used to distinguish it from buttermilk in older cookbooks.


15

I'm a bit of a coffee nut, having bought my own espresso machine & grinder and have been pulling my own shots and learning how to create different coffee drinks for some years now. I am by no means an expert, however: What you're seeing when the barista is swirling/tapping the milk jug is called "polishing". It's the step after they've steamed it and ...


6

Lactic acid is produced by 'probiotic' bacteria breaking lactose into lactic acid. Over time, more lactose is converted, producing more byproducts, thus more sourness. The byproducts of this reaction are responsible for the distinctive flavor of yogurt. See a more complete description here: Lactic Acid Fermentation


6

You are talking about the barista handling the milk after steaming it, right?My guess (from what I've seen in the milk jug @home): shake (rather: swirl, otherwise he'd just spill the milk) to loosen stuck-on foam on the top walls of the jug. hit to separate foam and milk (-> makes it easier for him to judge the milk-foam-ratio later) swirl again to loosen ...


5

Is half a gallon of milk that you may not need to throw out worth getting food poisoning over? If I had to choose between possible bloody diarrhea, vomiting, severe pain, seizures and possibly even death and spending a few more dollars, I certainly would spend a few more dollars. Throw the stuff away. If it's gone sour, you have a lively colony of bacteria ...


5

All coconut milk separates out. When you buy it tinned, there is often a plug of coconut cream above a pocket of coconut milk. But it certainly should recombine. It may well have been too cold when you tried to stir it together - let it come to room temperature at least. If you warmed it up on the stove you'd find the two would melt together without any ...


5

Yes, this is the way it is. The point of homogenization is to prevent the chunks of "butter" (it's actually kaymak, halfway between cream and butter). If you don't want them, you should drink homogenized milk. As for "too slowly", yes, you are drinking it very slowly. Normally, you should end a carton within 3-5 days of opening, regardless of the end date ...


4

You don't need to do this conversion. Most pudding mixes don't contain dry milk. And the mixture is in there to provide starch, not anything else. The first and best way to make a cake is to start with a good existing recipe. Getting a substitution right is not trivial, it requires some theoretical knowledge and a few iterations of making the recipe and ...


4

Soy milk can spoil, just like ordinary cow's milk. That seems to be what happened. While spoilage in cow's milk is usually souring, and the smell is unmistakable at fifty paces, soy milk spoils by turning gooey. I'm not sure about the details, but it's something in how the proteins react to oxygen. In soy milk, if I'm not mistaken, they turn into longer, ...


3

The Ozeri Deluxe milk frother claims an rpm of 15000 rpm http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BISKPMG/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00BISKPMG&linkCode=as2&tag=nmjv-20 However I have seen in ikea (and pound / dollar stores) a much cheaper option that to me seems much the same ...


3

Some jalebi can be dusted with citric acid to add tartness, but it really depends on the recipe. Jalebi itself isn't more than wheat and sugar, so chances are you're in the clear.


3

The problem you are facing is that your microwave temperature is too high and boils your milk too rapidly. The microwave does not heat food evenly and boils the milk too fast. Milk shouldn't be boiled too rapidly and doing this causes the casein in it to clump together and that curdles the milk. It should instead be brought 'to a boil' by heating on a slow ...


3

Assuming both have been pasteurized, the nutritional value is the same...You're certainly not going to be drinking milk at pasteurization temperatures. For raw milk, you have to weigh the risks of bacterial contamination. It's rare, but it can be exceedingly nasty.


3

Looking at the ingredients for Nesquick for example: SUGAR COCOA PROCESSED WITH ALKALI SOY LECITHIN CARRAGEENAN SALT ARTIFICIAL FLAVORS SPICE VITAMINS AND MINERALS: CALCIUM CARBONATE, ASCORBIC ACID (VITAMIN C), ZINC OXIDE, PYRIDOXINE HYDROCHLORIDE (VITAMIN B6), COPPER GLUCONATE, MANGANESE SULFATE, BIOTIN. The key elements are soy lecithin, which is an ...


3

No, there is nothing about raising otherwise-safe milk rapidly to a high temperature that is going to make you sick. Unless you are already lactose intolerant or otherwise allergic to milk. Raising milk rapidly to a temperature above the danger zone (140 F / 60 C) is going to make it safer, not less safe.


3

The one time I made mozzarella, I used this recipe. As I understand it, the key is (a) citric acid, and (b) kneading (that's what gives it the stringy texture). It turned out pretty well, but it didn't keep long at all.


3

Unless you are using a canning method that is actually designed for long term storage and shelf stability, you cannot assume the food is sterilized or pasteurized by home processing methods. You should therefore not expect a refrigerated shelf life of more than 2-3 days, the same as if you had not processed it. Finally, you are creating a low acid food ...


3

My son and I did this for science fair project. We left milk in a glass out at room temp . Day 1 whole milk and 2% was about the same. On day 2 the whole milk had a very slight odor and a slight film over top of glass. The 2% had a stronger odor and had seperated it had an inch of curds on top and inch of liquid on bottom.


3

This link should help you. It should be ok at least a week or two past the use by date. http://www.eatbydate.com/dairy/yogurt-shelf-life-expiration-date/


3

This is an old method for making cappuccino or latte without using a machine or frothing tool. To get bubbles in the milk, you have to shake, and tap(hit). This method is now used for special drinks which can be either alcoholic or non-alcoholic


2

I solved the problem by removing the outer "Panarello" wand and using the inner steam wand to stretch my milk, it gives you much more control and with a little practice it works a treat and produces nice glossy stretched milk perfect for latte art.


2

I haven't used goat milk in my baking because I don't like the taste of goats milk. I suspect it would be a good idea for you to taste goats milk first to see if you like it if you haven't already. Other than that, there's no reason to not use it. As far as fat content goes, I only use full-fat dairy in my bread. No adjustments to the recipe are needed.


2

Off the top of my head, the added sugar from the milk may cause the yeast to over-leaven the bread. The opposite is true when substituting water for milk, you may need to add sugar. Edit: According to this site, Glutathione in the milk must be destroyed by heating it first, otherwise it tends to inhibit yeast. Also, allegedly lactose doesn't contribute as ...


1

By golly it worked! :) Short Answer Yes, evaporated goat's milk works just fine in Cajeta and you can start with at least 50% less water than you would use to fully reconstitute the milk. That being the case, powdered goat's milk would probably work just the same way, but that has not (yet) been tested. Much Longer Answer Here's what I did: 24 Fluid ...


1

Ciao Bella has an excellent 'coconut sorbet', that had the creamy quality of ice cream, without any actual dairy. They released a cookbook a few years ago, and although I don't have it, I did browse through it in a store ... I don't remember the whole recipe, but I recall there being actual coconut meat in it, not just coconut milk. I don't remember there ...


1

Since I'm not sure how to re-post as my guest account, I just want to say that I tried a little variation after reading logophobe's answer stating that he thought an added oil would counteract the chalkiness. I toasted the rice grains (as the linked article stated) before soaking them, and then after blending, I strained the resulting milk once, and then ...


1

I've have now done it, and it's lovely. It gives a very slight tang to the bread, almost like a little nod to sourdough. I definitely like that it's full-fat, it's just richer. I used this: Powdered Goat's Milk which is available in most grocery stores here (at drastically different prices, one store's normal price is three times another store's normal ...


1

Goat milk is highly prized in baked goods and for those with digestive issues. I've used it often but because it is richer and costlier freezing it is a good option for leftovers. As the previous poster pointed out it is heavy on the fat content.


1

It is safer and helps increase the shelf life of the milk. Otherwise the milk will pass through dangerous temperatures and and may be recolonized with air born pathogens. These will grow rapidly during the period the milk is warm, and more slowly once it is refrigerated. While the milk may not become immediately unsafe or unpalatable, its storage ...


1

In that recipe, there are 2 cups of milk, and 2 tablespoons of butter. The difference in fat from dairy in going from milk to light cream at 15% fat is about 3 tablespoons of fat (and therefore, about 3 tablespoons less water). You are almost quite likely going to get a quite similar outcome if you eliminate the butter, and maybe add a tablespoon or two of ...



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