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9

A reasonably light cream (about 15% fat) should be fine as a substitute. It will lack the specific coconut flavour, obviously, but that's fine in this case. What's more important is the fat as a flavour carrier, and the creaminess in the texture. A soy based cream, or even oat milk should work equally well here, too. On the other hand, rice milk would ...


8

I'm not sure your exact recipe or method, but you cannot get rid of the burnt taste or smell and you will need to start over with fresh ingredients. You don't need or want to boil the milk at any part of the process, just to heat the milk enough to activate the thickener. In the case of a classic flour roux thickened sauce you start by cooking the roux for ...


8

There is nothing you can add or do to your sauce to remove or mask the burnt taste. Really. Don't even try. Throw it out and start over, being careful not to burn it this time. For some foods, there are various tricks you can try for removing the burnt taste, but they all start with removing the burnt bits. With a sauce where you've already thoroughly ...


7

As ChrisH said in the comments, probably all that matters is that the milk is a liquid. If the end result is supposed to be something solid, there can't possibly be that much milk in there, and the fat and flavor of the milk are pretty small compared to the meat. So, just use another liquid. If you're not worried about flavor, water would work. Stock/broth ...


6

First off I want to point out the term "fresh". While some containers might keep milk from spoiling for longer, it may not taste as nice. Several things might be why: 1.) Plastics leach flavor and odor into the milk. Cardboard cartons are also lined with plastic, not wax since about the 1940s. I would say this is likely the biggest impact-- I've always ...


6

If you want to closely replicate the water/fat/sugar content of milk, you can use the following (originally from this other question): 200 mL water 2 tsp pure fat (e.g., cooking oil) 1 tbsp sugar That will produce the equivalent of 1 cup of whole milk. You can substitute the water for some other flavorful liquid (e.g., stock or juice), but you will need ...


5

Pasteurized milk is the standard way milk is sold in industrialized countries. How it's packaged can depend on the country but it's perfectly safe to drink provided it's consumed by the "use by" date. Pasteurization is a heat-treating process: Pasteurization (American English) or pasteurisation (British English) is a process invented by French ...


5

I use lemon zest in my tea while its steeping, then I strain it through a fine strainer. Gives you all the benefits and no curdling.


5

If you can't find a reusable sour cream starter, you can use buttermilk starter. Some bloggers and biology/chemistry professors just use fresh active buttermilk as a starter rather than ordering some online. If you look at the various labels and product pages, you will find that both the buttermilk and sour cream starters contain the same four cultures: ...


4

Yes, you can. Adjust the power to medium-high, pour the milk into a Pyrex measuring cup (or similar), and drop a wooden implement (a disposable chopstick is ideal) into the cup. Keeping the heat lower than maximum will give you more time to react when the milk threatens to boil over. The chopstick will prevent the rare but possible occurrence of ...


3

Add it if you like! As mentioned in the comments, eggnog usually already has nutmeg in it, so when you say you say you can't taste anything other than nog, in reality you're probably tasting eggnog including nutmeg! If what you add is pre-ground, the flavor probably isn't terribly strong. And even with freshly grated nutmeg, you're probably only adding a ...


3

It's simple. Heirlooms will produce expected results no matter how many times you reinoculate your culture. Direct set is a blend of species and eventually only the strongest strain will remain and it may not create anything you want to eat. I never bought cultures, I just buy plain or vanilla yogurt, eat it and use what's left behind to make another batch. ...


3

You may also want to try Thai country-style curry recipes. Country-style curry contains no coconut milk so there is no need to try to replicate a primary ingredient; the dish just has a different character. Here are some recipe examples, though I have not made these. http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/red-curry-beef-shiitakes-edamame.aspx ...


3

My wife and daughter can't do dairy and we regularly substitute almond milk or coconut milk for regular milk in recipes. It almost always works fine. I'd probably go with almond milk for this recipe.


3

Nothing at all. It doesn't matter how you close the milk, 3-5 days in the refrigerator is the time it will last in the refrigerator. If your grandmother wants to spend less money on milk, she will have to buy it in smaller packages. Even if they cost more per unit, she'll have to calculate the price when taking in account the waste from the bag.


2

I do hard cheese from goat milk, I do not have specific amounts to give you but I will share my experience. At first when following recepies I had the same issue until I started to pay no mind to quantity and once milk starts to simmer I start squirting in the white wine vinegar and gently mix with a slotted inox spoon (the pan is also inox. Aluminium pans ...


2

Even if your purchasing milk from a dairy that doesn't pasteurize their product the amount of cream is going to be very minimal. Dairies separate all the cream from their milk and when they package it as whole milk they only add back 3 and 1/2 percent cream to make whole milk. This means that for a gallon of milk (which is 128 ounces) they only return 4.48 ...


2

Maybe your milk is about to go bad? According to the website below, when the milk is almost bad the acidity in coffee or tea is just enough to make the proteins combine and make the milk curdle. This is from foodreference.about.com: Milk and Coffee or Tea On occasion, cold milk added to coffee or tea will curdle. This can be alarming as curdled milk is ...


2

Butter is made from yoghurt in Jordan as well. This is typical of countries with sheep milk, as the sheep fat does not rise to the top spontaneously as with cow milk and people have learnt to churn butter from soured milk -aka yoghurt in a hot climate. You add cold water or ice to bring the temperature of the churned yoghurt down. I have found however, that ...


2

As Ecnerwal answer implies, there are various ways, but from my experience with baking-grade cocoa: go with pasting. Add a LITTLE milk at first, stir, repeat until you have a paste, continue adding milk slowly and stirring until you have a liquid. Then add all the milk and/or other liquids you want. I do this for making even hot chocolate drinks, because it ...


2

I think the Q&A linked by @Joe has most of the tricks in it. Hot, paste, make syrup, blender, etc. Mixing stuff into cold milk (unless specially prepped for that) is not a good scene. Surprising they haven't done better at that given the marketing, but corporate competence is a rare thing - they may be too big to get someone that knows how to make a ...


2

I don't think I've tried this in ice cream, but a trick I picked up for sorbets (via looking at commercial product ingredient lists - often boring and full of things you can't get at home, but sometimes there's a useful nugget hiding in there) was to add pectin - the "regular" stuff, not the pink "low sugar" stuff (misleading - it's for "low sugar" canning, ...


2

A basic sponge does not contain milk, yoghurt or other dairy, neither does his closely related cousin, the pound cake (except for butter, of course). That said, obviously there are many recipes that use extra ingredients like dairy products. Usually the percentages of the recipes are a bit different from the "base" recipes. There are a few reasons to add ...


2

No, it is not a good idea at all. It will be worse, not better. What you are missing here is that cocoa powder does not dissolve at all, never, it just disperses in water (or milk). So there is no reason why methods for dissolving stuff would work with cocoa powder. You will need to use a method created for colloid-producing powders like cocoa powder, which ...


2

This looks like Trileçe which is indeed a Turkish take on tres leches: Trileçe’s heritage is a lot more complicated than that of the éclair. Chasing down the elusive origins of this cake – a Balkan cousin of the Latin American classic tres leches – leads to a deep, dark, global rabbit hole. And it's certainly got milk in it! At Köfteci Arnavut they ...


2

I suspect that it's the source of the milk rather than the container. The shorter the supply chain from cow to your refrigerator, the longer the milk will last in your refrigerator. Mass-produced supermarket milk, which is generally (always?) sold in low-cost plastic containers, spends more time being shipped and distributed than locally-sourced organic ...


2

You don't say what type of rice pudding you want to make, and wikipedia lists quite a few. I'm assuming you want to make a traditional british baked rice pudding in this answer, but if not then it might be useful to clarify what you want to make, as many cultures make different rice puddings and use different rices to make them. I think you can make rice ...


2

Commercial eggnog virtually ALWAYS has nutmeg in it, so you are just adding to that. While it's easy to grab the stuff, it's worth making your own eggnog if you'd like to raise your 'nog experience several notches. I can't imagine grinding nutmeg at home - that would take a heck of a grinder, and it would be hard to do less than a whole nutmeg at a time, ...


2

You can seek out non-dairy creamers, such as coconut milk coffee creamer, rice milk creamer. These have added stabilizers that prevent coagulation in acidic coffee, which I think would work in your lemon tea.


2

Not only are "friendly" bacteria being cultured, those bacteria make an acidic environment which is hostile to "bad" bacteria. Myself, I make plain yogurt and mix things into it at the time of eating, but things mixed in from the start essentially become "yogurt-pickled" and should be fine for a reasonable period under refrigeration. A standard part of ...



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