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15

I'm a bit of a coffee nut, having bought my own espresso machine & grinder and have been pulling my own shots and learning how to create different coffee drinks for some years now. I am by no means an expert, however: What you're seeing when the barista is swirling/tapping the milk jug is called "polishing". It's the step after they've steamed it and ...


6

Lactic acid is produced by 'probiotic' bacteria breaking lactose into lactic acid. Over time, more lactose is converted, producing more byproducts, thus more sourness. The byproducts of this reaction are responsible for the distinctive flavor of yogurt. See a more complete description here: Lactic Acid Fermentation


6

You are talking about the barista handling the milk after steaming it, right?My guess (from what I've seen in the milk jug @home): shake (rather: swirl, otherwise he'd just spill the milk) to loosen stuck-on foam on the top walls of the jug. hit to separate foam and milk (-> makes it easier for him to judge the milk-foam-ratio later) swirl again to loosen ...


5

All coconut milk separates out. When you buy it tinned, there is often a plug of coconut cream above a pocket of coconut milk. But it certainly should recombine. It may well have been too cold when you tried to stir it together - let it come to room temperature at least. If you warmed it up on the stove you'd find the two would melt together without any ...


5

Yes, this is the way it is. The point of homogenization is to prevent the chunks of "butter" (it's actually kaymak, halfway between cream and butter). If you don't want them, you should drink homogenized milk. As for "too slowly", yes, you are drinking it very slowly. Normally, you should end a carton within 3-5 days of opening, regardless of the end date ...


4

You don't need to do this conversion. Most pudding mixes don't contain dry milk. And the mixture is in there to provide starch, not anything else. The first and best way to make a cake is to start with a good existing recipe. Getting a substitution right is not trivial, it requires some theoretical knowledge and a few iterations of making the recipe and ...


4

Soy milk can spoil, just like ordinary cow's milk. That seems to be what happened. While spoilage in cow's milk is usually souring, and the smell is unmistakable at fifty paces, soy milk spoils by turning gooey. I'm not sure about the details, but it's something in how the proteins react to oxygen. In soy milk, if I'm not mistaken, they turn into longer, ...


4

Pasteurized milk is the standard way milk is sold in industrialized countries. How it's packaged can depend on the country but it's perfectly safe to drink provided it's consumed by the "use by" date. Pasteurization is a heat-treating process: Pasteurization (American English) or pasteurisation (British English) is a process invented by French ...


3

This link should help you. It should be ok at least a week or two past the use by date. http://www.eatbydate.com/dairy/yogurt-shelf-life-expiration-date/


3

By golly it worked! :) Short Answer Yes, evaporated goat's milk works just fine in Cajeta and you can start with at least 50% less water than you would use to fully reconstitute the milk. That being the case, powdered goat's milk would probably work just the same way, but that has not (yet) been tested. Much Longer Answer Here's what I did: 24 Fluid ...


3

The Ozeri Deluxe milk frother claims an rpm of 15000 rpm http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BISKPMG/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00BISKPMG&linkCode=as2&tag=nmjv-20 However I have seen in ikea (and pound / dollar stores) a much cheaper option that to me seems much the same ...


3

Some jalebi can be dusted with citric acid to add tartness, but it really depends on the recipe. Jalebi itself isn't more than wheat and sugar, so chances are you're in the clear.


3

The problem you are facing is that your microwave temperature is too high and boils your milk too rapidly. The microwave does not heat food evenly and boils the milk too fast. Milk shouldn't be boiled too rapidly and doing this causes the casein in it to clump together and that curdles the milk. It should instead be brought 'to a boil' by heating on a slow ...


3

I use lemon zest in my tea while its steeping, then I strain it through a fine strainer. Gives you all the benefits and no curdling.


3

This is an old method for making cappuccino or latte without using a machine or frothing tool. To get bubbles in the milk, you have to shake, and tap(hit). This method is now used for special drinks which can be either alcoholic or non-alcoholic


3

I will disagree with Johanna here. While hers sounds like a reasonable definition, it is not how the word is used in practice. Milk is A) Cow's (also goat's, sheep's, camel's and mare's) lactated fluid, or B) Any liquid which kinda looks like A), doesn't have an overly strong taste, and there is a convention of being called a milk. It can in many cases ...


3

Add it if you like! As mentioned in the comments, eggnog usually already has nutmeg in it, so when you say you say you can't taste anything other than nog, in reality you're probably tasting eggnog including nutmeg! If what you add is pre-ground, the flavor probably isn't terribly strong. And even with freshly grated nutmeg, you're probably only adding a ...


2

I do hard cheese from goat milk, I do not have specific amounts to give you but I will share my experience. At first when following recepies I had the same issue until I started to pay no mind to quantity and once milk starts to simmer I start squirting in the white wine vinegar and gently mix with a slotted inox spoon (the pan is also inox. Aluminium pans ...


2

I solved the problem by removing the outer "Panarello" wand and using the inner steam wand to stretch my milk, it gives you much more control and with a little practice it works a treat and produces nice glossy stretched milk perfect for latte art.


2

Butter is made from yoghurt in Jordan as well. This is typical of countries with sheep milk, as the sheep fat does not rise to the top spontaneously as with cow milk and people have learnt to churn butter from soured milk -aka yoghurt in a hot climate. You add cold water or ice to bring the temperature of the churned yoghurt down. I have found however, that ...


2

in rural turkey butter is made only from yogurt.add water to homemade naturel yogurt and mix it for some 10 15 minutes.you will see first butter bubbles and then the butter clusters on the surface of ayran.seperate it with a spoon and wash with cool water to get it more pure and add some salt. when you smell and taste you will see it is much more different ...


2

I haven't used goat milk in my baking because I don't like the taste of goats milk. I suspect it would be a good idea for you to taste goats milk first to see if you like it if you haven't already. Other than that, there's no reason to not use it. As far as fat content goes, I only use full-fat dairy in my bread. No adjustments to the recipe are needed.


2

Off the top of my head, the added sugar from the milk may cause the yeast to over-leaven the bread. The opposite is true when substituting water for milk, you may need to add sugar. Edit: According to this site, Glutathione in the milk must be destroyed by heating it first, otherwise it tends to inhibit yeast. Also, allegedly lactose doesn't contribute as ...


2

I think the Q&A linked by @Joe has most of the tricks in it. Hot, paste, make syrup, blender, etc. Mixing stuff into cold milk (unless specially prepped for that) is not a good scene. Surprising they haven't done better at that given the marketing, but corporate competence is a rare thing - they may be too big to get someone that knows how to make a ...


2

As Ecnerwal answer implies, there are various ways, but from my experience with baking-grade cocoa: go with pasting. Add a LITTLE milk at first, stir, repeat until you have a paste, continue adding milk slowly and stirring until you have a liquid. Then add all the milk and/or other liquids you want. I do this for making even hot chocolate drinks, because it ...


2

No, it is not a good idea at all. It will be worse, not better. What you are missing here is that cocoa powder does not dissolve at all, never, it just disperses in water (or milk). So there is no reason why methods for dissolving stuff would work with cocoa powder. You will need to use a method created for colloid-producing powders like cocoa powder, which ...


2

A basic sponge does not contain milk, yoghurt or other dairy, neither does his closely related cousin, the pound cake (except for butter, of course). That said, obviously there are many recipes that use extra ingredients like dairy products. Usually the percentages of the recipes are a bit different from the "base" recipes. There are a few reasons to add ...


2

This looks like Trileçe which is indeed a Turkish take on tres leches: Trileçe’s heritage is a lot more complicated than that of the éclair. Chasing down the elusive origins of this cake – a Balkan cousin of the Latin American classic tres leches – leads to a deep, dark, global rabbit hole. And it's certainly got milk in it! At Köfteci Arnavut they ...


2

Commercial eggnog virtually ALWAYS has nutmeg in it, so you are just adding to that. While it's easy to grab the stuff, it's worth making your own eggnog if you'd like to raise your 'nog experience several notches. I can't imagine grinding nutmeg at home - that would take a heck of a grinder, and it would be hard to do less than a whole nutmeg at a time, ...


1

If you're not sure if your milk has soured or spoiled, then you are playing with fire. Either way, I'm sticking with the science on this one: doing anything without first pasteurizing what you have would be at the risk of acquiring a foodborne illness. To make any other recommendation on this site I believe would be irresponsible. The fact that that ...



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