Hot answers tagged

9

A reasonably light cream (about 15% fat) should be fine as a substitute. It will lack the specific coconut flavour, obviously, but that's fine in this case. What's more important is the fat as a flavour carrier, and the creaminess in the texture. A soy based cream, or even oat milk should work equally well here, too. On the other hand, rice milk would ...


8

There is nothing you can add or do to your sauce to remove or mask the burnt taste. Really. Don't even try. Throw it out and start over, being careful not to burn it this time. For some foods, there are various tricks you can try for removing the burnt taste, but they all start with removing the burnt bits. With a sauce where you've already thoroughly ...


8

I'm not sure your exact recipe or method, but you cannot get rid of the burnt taste or smell and you will need to start over with fresh ingredients. You don't need or want to boil the milk at any part of the process, just to heat the milk enough to activate the thickener. In the case of a classic flour roux thickened sauce you start by cooking the roux for ...


8

If the milk is modified by removing the lactose, it is no longer considered milk, and must be sold under a different name, such as milkdrink. The fat content can be modified while still considering it milk however. The swedish FAQ of Valio (the biggest dairy producer in Finland) is very clear on this. http://www.valio.se/halsa/laktosintolerans/fragor-och-...


7

As ChrisH said in the comments, probably all that matters is that the milk is a liquid. If the end result is supposed to be something solid, there can't possibly be that much milk in there, and the fat and flavor of the milk are pretty small compared to the meat. So, just use another liquid. If you're not worried about flavor, water would work. Stock/broth ...


6

If you want to closely replicate the water/fat/sugar content of milk, you can use the following (originally from this other question): 200 mL water 2 tsp pure fat (e.g., cooking oil) 1 tbsp sugar That will produce the equivalent of 1 cup of whole milk. You can substitute the water for some other flavorful liquid (e.g., stock or juice), but you will need ...


6

First off I want to point out the term "fresh". While some containers might keep milk from spoiling for longer, it may not taste as nice. Several things might be why: 1.) Plastics leach flavor and odor into the milk. Cardboard cartons are also lined with plastic, not wax since about the 1940s. I would say this is likely the biggest impact-- I've always ...


6

If you can't find a reusable sour cream starter, you can use buttermilk starter. Some bloggers and biology/chemistry professors just use fresh active buttermilk as a starter rather than ordering some online. If you look at the various labels and product pages, you will find that both the buttermilk and sour cream starters contain the same four cultures: ...


6

A stove would be the traditional method for making oats and it doesn't require a microwave. It takes longer than the microwave but it works just fine, if not better (but this will vary by personal preference). Add milk to a small pot, bring it to simmer, add oats to the pot, cook for recommended amount of time depending on the type of oats you're using (see ...


5

It has to remind people of milk in looks and consistency and not be too strongly flavored of something else. Really, there is no authority which appoints stuff as "milk". If it looks sufficiently like milk, it is likely that people will call it milk. If it is edible and available in large quantities (unlike the milk of, say, Euphorbia) people will try ...


5

There are three factors when cooking oats or similar like cooked pudding or flan: Stirring You have to be fairly diligent because if you do not stir constantly or at least in quite short intervals, the starchy mix near the bottom will stick. You need to "scrape" the entire bottom, not forgetting the outer areas or some streaks in the middle. This is ...


4

Yes, you can. Adjust the power to medium-high, pour the milk into a Pyrex measuring cup (or similar), and drop a wooden implement (a disposable chopstick is ideal) into the cup. Keeping the heat lower than maximum will give you more time to react when the milk threatens to boil over. The chopstick will prevent the rare but possible occurrence of ...


4

Title 21 (Food and Drugs) of the Code of Federal Regulation states "(d) When foods characterized on the label as "nondairy" contain a caseinate ingredient, the caseinate ingredient shall be followed by a parenthetical statement identifying its source. For example, if the manufacturer uses the term "nondairy" on a creamer that contains sodium ...


4

You'll be fine doing a straight substitution. Well, maybe I shouldn't be so definitive since these are powders we're talking about and it's not quite the same thing, but I've substituted buttermilk for whole milk in bread recipes plenty of times. The only thing that changed for me was the rising time. When I use buttermilk in my sandwich bread, it needs ...


4

A latte is similar to a cappuccino but with different proportions. It's unsurprising that a similar method and equipment would be used. Cappuccino needs steamed milk to get the froth, so a coffee bar machine has a steam pipe. To boil the milk for a latte would require an extra piece of equipment and the associated space. Is perfectly possible to make an ...


3

My wife and daughter can't do dairy and we regularly substitute almond milk or coconut milk for regular milk in recipes. It almost always works fine. I'd probably go with almond milk for this recipe.


3

You may also want to try Thai country-style curry recipes. Country-style curry contains no coconut milk so there is no need to try to replicate a primary ingredient; the dish just has a different character. Here are some recipe examples, though I have not made these. http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/red-curry-beef-shiitakes-edamame.aspx http://www....


3

Nothing at all. It doesn't matter how you close the milk, 3-5 days in the refrigerator is the time it will last in the refrigerator. If your grandmother wants to spend less money on milk, she will have to buy it in smaller packages. Even if they cost more per unit, she'll have to calculate the price when taking in account the waste from the bag.


3

It's simple. Heirlooms will produce expected results no matter how many times you reinoculate your culture. Direct set is a blend of species and eventually only the strongest strain will remain and it may not create anything you want to eat. I never bought cultures, I just buy plain or vanilla yogurt, eat it and use what's left behind to make another batch. ...


3

I think I understand what you mean about "hairy" taste; I think of it as a "goaty" taste. Unfortunately, the diet of the goat contributes much more to the flavor of the milk, than sheep or cow diets/milk. This is one of the reasons that goat milk is a favorite when it comes to cheese making. It adds a little funkiness to the cheese. Now all that said, how ...


3

Chocolate milk is frequently made with either chocolate syrup (which has no fat) or a powdered mix of cocoa powder and sugar (which has almost no fat) for precisely this reason. You can make it with chocolate by sprinkling very finely grated chocolate into hot milk, but you still run the risk of the fat separating.


3

It's not a specific date, as there are just too many variables -- what temperature it's been stored at, and how many days since the seal has been broken are likely more significant. Growing up, my mom would use it for pancakes and baking once it started to smell a little bit off, but would dispose of it when it started to curdle (separate & get chunky). ...


3

I'm not so lucky as to be able to get whole raw milk… Wait, then there's a flaw in your premise. Check the label. Any milk treated using high-heat processes like UHT, pasteurization or ultra-pasteurized milk doesn't sour like it used to in your grandmother's days; it spoils… goes rotten. Spoiled milk is not the same as soured milk. The ...


3

Either you failed to adequately pasteurize the milk, or your culture was bad, or some unclean / unsanitized (some would say sterilized, I know better) utensil was involved on the cooling/inoculating side of the pasteurization step. 4 hours is a remarkably short incubation time - were you aiming for a "liquid/drinkable" yogurt? For a set yogurt 8-12 hours is ...


2

Maybe your milk is about to go bad? According to the website below, when the milk is almost bad the acidity in coffee or tea is just enough to make the proteins combine and make the milk curdle. This is from foodreference.about.com: Milk and Coffee or Tea On occasion, cold milk added to coffee or tea will curdle. This can be alarming as curdled milk is ...


2

The fat, protein, calcium, water in the milk make the snack more nutritious and healthy without changing into another taste experience like, say, cookies and salad. Like the cookie, milk is still a sweet taste (lactose) and a rich experience (calories and fat). Combined they make a great snack or desert experience. It seems evolutionary to me that we would ...


2

having instant coffee, or camp (chicory) coffee made with hot milk is the only way to serve it! Loads of regional variations on what it's called, I just know it as a coffee made with milk! It won't split the milk, and if you have 1 spoon of coffee when made with water, add at least half a spoon again when making it with milk to give a rich, smooth flavour.


2

Even if your purchasing milk from a dairy that doesn't pasteurize their product the amount of cream is going to be very minimal. Dairies separate all the cream from their milk and when they package it as whole milk they only add back 3 and 1/2 percent cream to make whole milk. This means that for a gallon of milk (which is 128 ounces) they only return 4.48 ...


2

I have re-used my direct set with success; just No Guarantee. Contamination issue is no different. Think of Heirloom as an old-time garden tomato vrs a high performing hybrid that won't breed true.


2

You might consider going with pasteurized eggs (if you can find them whole) or a pasteurized egg product (a common US brand is "Egg Beaters"). Pasteurized eggs are eggs that have been pasteurized in order to reduce the risk of food-borne illness in dishes that are not cooked or are only lightly cooked. They may be sold as liquid egg products or ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible