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Yes, this is the way it is. The point of homogenization is to prevent the chunks of "butter" (it's actually kaymak, halfway between cream and butter). If you don't want them, you should drink homogenized milk. As for "too slowly", yes, you are drinking it very slowly. Normally, you should end a carton within 3-5 days of opening, regardless of the end date ...


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Your whitener may have the same problem as when I use soy milk in my coffee. With certain brands of coffee the milk curdles due to the acidity of the coffee. I have found that the curdling is also influenced by the temperature difference between the milk and the coffee. For this reason I suggest: Buying coffee that you know is not too acidic for your ...


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I add cocoa powder and sweetener to a mug, then add skim milk. Microwave for a minute or until almost boiling, and it should be completely dissolved. Since you're trying to make chocolate milk not hot cocoa, just chill it afterwards.


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Put cream in the milk. This prevents the milk from sticking. Put a wooden spoon in the milk pot; this will break the foam and prevent boiling over. Use medium heat.


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I have not seen this "aloe vera jelly" you describe, but from its behavior (clumps milk, needs a boil), it seems to be a pectin based thickener. If it is HM pectin, it will need enough acid, and this will clump the milk. The simple answer is that you will not be able to make a milk jelly with this thickener. Your options is to either use a different white ...


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I also have a plastic container of buttermilk in the back of my frig cause it's coldest there for some reason and my expired in nov and it stills smells like buttermilk . I just shake it up before using , do the sniff test, and ck for mold and chunky texture if it's all good then I'm baking . Today I will be making banana bread 😃 Happy cooking


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I know what you mean with the non dissolving creamer. Normally though, I find it happens when the water isnt hot enough. Maybe just check that it is and see if that helps


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This answer is assuming 3.5% butter fat for the whole milk(UK regulations). Paneer is between 25% and 27% butter fat. Since the ratio of fat in milk is mass(or weight depending on the country) per unit volume we can quickly calculate that it would take between 715 and 775 mL of whole milk (assuming all milk fat is captured in the curd) to yield the 25 to ...


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A half gallon of whole milk makes about 10 ounces of paneer (From the kitchn). So conversions and cross-multiplication later, about 670ml of whole milk will make about 100g of paneer. Since it's not an exact science, how about using a quart (946ml) of milk, 2 TBS of lemon juice and 1/8-1/4 tsp salt. That should yield about 140g of cheese, giving you a little ...


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Use half and half. More on the actual question though q: it may help to dissolve in just a bit of water first so it's easier to really mash it in and get it all wet. Just a theory though!



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