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-1

You'd better not, the milk is easy to boil while heating. Just dissolve the cocoa powder in hot water or milk then stir is okay.


2

No, it is not a good idea at all. It will be worse, not better. What you are missing here is that cocoa powder does not dissolve at all, never, it just disperses in water (or milk). So there is no reason why methods for dissolving stuff would work with cocoa powder. You will need to use a method created for colloid-producing powders like cocoa powder, which ...


0

Good answer above covers most; but a couple points. In the US you typically only find pasteurize and ultra pasteurized in normal containers; these typically still can leak in both air and light. This results in a 1-2 month shelf life for UHT and 2-3 weeks for pasteurized. Europe and many other countries you can find Aspectic packaging (milk ...


4

Pasteurized milk is the standard way milk is sold in industrialized countries. How it's packaged can depend on the country but it's perfectly safe to drink provided it's consumed by the "use by" date. Pasteurization is a heat-treating process: Pasteurization (American English) or pasteurisation (British English) is a process invented by French ...


2

As Ecnerwal answer implies, there are various ways, but from my experience with baking-grade cocoa: go with pasting. Add a LITTLE milk at first, stir, repeat until you have a paste, continue adding milk slowly and stirring until you have a liquid. Then add all the milk and/or other liquids you want. I do this for making even hot chocolate drinks, because it ...


2

I think the Q&A linked by @Joe has most of the tricks in it. Hot, paste, make syrup, blender, etc. Mixing stuff into cold milk (unless specially prepped for that) is not a good scene. Surprising they haven't done better at that given the marketing, but corporate competence is a rare thing - they may be too big to get someone that knows how to make a ...


1

I don't think I've tried this in ice cream, but a trick I picked up for sorbets (via looking at commercial product ingredient lists - often boring and full of things you can't get at home, but sometimes there's a useful nugget hiding in there) was to add pectin - the "regular" stuff, not the pink "low sugar" stuff (misleading - it's for "low sugar" canning, ...


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While I cannot comment on the use of arabic gum in ice cream recipes, I will share what I do to to help lower the fat in our homemade ice cream. I use a combination of Fat Free Sweetened Condensed Milk, Low Fat (2%) Evaporated Milk (you can also substitute fat free half and half or low fat milk) and unflavored gelatin as a base. Off of that base, my wife ...



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