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Lactic acid is produced by 'probiotic' bacteria breaking lactose into lactic acid. Over time, more lactose is converted, producing more byproducts, thus more sourness. The byproducts of this reaction are responsible for the distinctive flavor of yogurt. See a more complete description here: Lactic Acid Fermentation


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I was looking online and someone made oat milk without doing any cooking. So I did something like that 1 cup oats (ground to flour). This is probably too much especially since I also used coconut flour (mainly for flavor). It isn't "right" yet, but I think with the right ratios I might be able to do this w/o any cooking. Probably I need to use a blender ...


3

The Ozeri Deluxe milk frother claims an rpm of 15000 rpm http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BISKPMG/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00BISKPMG&linkCode=as2&tag=nmjv-20 However I have seen in ikea (and pound / dollar stores) a much cheaper option that to me seems much the same ...


1

Ciao Bella has an excellent 'coconut sorbet', that had the creamy quality of ice cream, without any actual dairy. They released a cookbook a few years ago, and although I don't have it, I did browse through it in a store ... I don't remember the whole recipe, but I recall there being actual coconut meat in it, not just coconut milk. I don't remember there ...


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I am fairly sure this will work. What matters in ice cream is not so much the emulsion, as the ratio of solids to water. Once everything is dispersed finely enough (and in a roux, it is), it should work well. There are ice creams which use starch too, for example gelato. You'll have to boil your sauce though, a simple slurry is likely to have an unpleasant ...


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If you're going for low-fat but still creamy then tapioca starch works very well. I use it for sorbet, so it should work fine with milk substitutes as well. Use about 1 tablespoon of starch per quart of liquid. Add another two teaspoons if you have no fat whatsoever. Make a slurry, cook to a low boil until thickened, etc. etc.


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The link for Jalebi shows the ingredients as wheat flour dough and a sugar syrup. Those ingredients are not acid and will not make milk curdle. If you flavor the syrup you might consider using non- acidic flavorings. Herbs and spice extracts such as vanilla will work. Orange,mandarin flavors will be good if you use the grated zest portion. The zingy taste ...


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I have the same issue and it is NOT because the milk has approached the expiration date when it's a day old or too high of a microwave setting when it dues thus randomly. What I've found is that it may be a chemical reaction with the rinsing agent in your dishwasher and milk.


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First you want to make sure that your raw milk comes from grass-fed cows. Satisfying this requirement, and also making sure that the cows do not live abusive lives, in poor conditions, such as in minimal amounts of space and so on (as the ones of the dairy industry), there will be nothing to worry about it. There is some superstition about raw milk but, in ...


3

Some jalebi can be dusted with citric acid to add tartness, but it really depends on the recipe. Jalebi itself isn't more than wheat and sugar, so chances are you're in the clear.


3

The problem you are facing is that your microwave temperature is too high and boils your milk too rapidly. The microwave does not heat food evenly and boils the milk too fast. Milk shouldn't be boiled too rapidly and doing this causes the casein in it to clump together and that curdles the milk. It should instead be brought 'to a boil' by heating on a slow ...


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Check the temperature/heat rating that you are setting on the microwave. Very likely its a bit too high and that's the reason why it has a similar reaction as to when lemon juice or vinegar is added to milk.


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I make a coconut curry "b├ęchamel" sauce every once in a while. Usually use it with chicken and broccoli and etc. recipes that I serve over pineapple fried rice. Make a roux (using at least some butter), shake up a can of coconut milk and whisk it in until the desired consistency (and then I also add curry to taste). FYI: B├ęchamel sauces aren't served cold ...



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