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10

Why Alcohol? Alcohol is used for extracts because the flavor compounds (plant oils) you are trying to extract do not easily dissolve in water. Alcohol (typically bourbon or vodka) will do the trick. Make sure you use +80 proof because it also acts as a preservative. Making Mint Extract To make an extract, tear up or coarsely chop and bruise washed mint ...


9

There's a lovely middle-eastern recipe for mint lemonade. I used to make loads of this stuff in my navy days. So, for a jug serving six sailors: Juice of about 2-3 lemons Six tablespoons of sugar nice handful of mint Put the mint and sugar in the jug and pour about half a cup of boiling water. Stir well, and leave for a few minutes so that the mint can ...


7

The classic mistake when making a Mojito or a Julep is to over muddle the mint. Pounding away at the mint will release so much flavour from it, that you won't taste any of the other ingredients. A perfect Mojito should comprise a balance of flavours. The other main constituents do not have a particularly strong flavour, so its very easy to swamp them with ...


6

When we make mojitos, we put the lime, sugar, and mint into the glass then crush it with a wooden spoon. Do this separately for each drink. This is pretty time consuming which isn't a problem when you're making 1 or 2 glasses. If you're making more, you may want to use another method.


5

I have always wondered how in anglosaxon speaking countries, people think that "mint" is always the same as "mint", just because it has the same name. In fact, spearmint tastes as different from peppermint as thymian from oregano. Almost all cooking recipes I know of are meant for spearmint, except for some sweet applications. All mint tea I have encountered ...


5

I've dried homegrown mint, and used it in wintertime for tabouli and suchlike. It works. Don't add boiling water to rehydrate; that'll extract the flavor from the leaves, which is not what you want here. Just stir the leaves into enough cool water to make a thick glop, and let it sit for 30 minutes or so. Mix that into your bulgur. Up the parsley to make up ...


5

For something like a drink, I generally bruise the mint and use the whole leaves fresh - rub it between your fingers a bit to release the oils and then just drop it in the drink. The main benefit of this method for me is that a bunch of dry, crumbled mint in a drink is going to make it look very muddled and hard to drink, as you're constantly getting a ...


5

Yes, many oils or lipids are dissolved in alcohol, whereas they cannot dissolve in water. This is why, for example, vanilla extract is based on alcohol. That would depend on the ratio of leaves to vodka, and how long you steeped. Probably no where near what commercial extracts are. It would be unlikely to be drinkable straight, since the flavor would ...


4

Harms? Meh, that's silliness. You can make your own fizzy water if you're so inclined. Sodamakers. If you really don't want fizzy, then just substitute still water in any of the recipes in a search for Virgin Mojitos. Choose recipes that use soda water, club soda or seltzer water, not ginger ale. Ginger ale adds flavor, you want recipes that stand without ...


4

Middle Eastern Lemonade Serves 6 8 lemons 3/4 cup sugar, or to taste 1 teaspoon orange blossom water, or to taste generous 1/4 cup freshly chopped mint water (or seltzer) and ice cubes Is this what you're looking for maybe?


4

The best way I've found to get full flavor out of the mint is to infuse your liquor with it. I do this for mint juleps. Simply take a handful of mint, bruise it (you can just crush it in your hand or stick it in a bag and whack it a couple of times with a wooden spoon), and place it in your liquor of choice (white rum in this case) and leave it for a day or ...


3

I am assuming your couverture was real chocolate, since you haven't said. While I don't know the effect of alchohol on chocolate, small quantities of water can easily seize chocolate. It becomes a nasty, pasty, stiff mess. Typical 80 proof vodka would be 40% alcohol by volume, and so approximately 60% water, so your homemade extract would have had ...


3

You want to make a "mint infusion". Googling this will give you many recipes. Basically you brew the mint like herbal tea: Remove stems, Bruise the leaves a little, Add the leaves to a cup of very hot water, Let steep for a few minutes, strain and throw away the mushy leaves and use the liquid for your flavoring. The liquid will be brown as you are ...


3

I prefer to muddle the mint. Muddling is simply bruising the mint with a stick. If you are using sugar (white or cane sugar) to sweeten your Mojito instead of syrup, you can put the sugar in the bottom of the glass and bruise the mint on top of the sugar. It works well to muddle with about a shot (or half shot) of alcohol as well. Muddling gives you a ...


3

This site makes a case for not muddling the mint at all; muddled mint can give "really muddy, dirty flavors," according to their expert, Leo Robitschek of The NoMad and Eleven Madison Park in Manhattan. If you're looking to avoid bits of mint in your teeth, they have two suggestions: Make a mint simple syrup by "steeping mint leaves in hot water for about ...


2

You seem to be saying you have two issues: weak flavor, and watery sauce. There can be many separate causes for each, but one problem that causes both issues is a lack of reduction. What are you doing to reduce the sauce down and concentrate it? Are those the only 3 ingredients you are using?


2

I haven't had to muddle mint but I found this forum that tells you how. It says to bruise the mint but not to break it up. They recommend using a muddler, a pestle or the end of a rolling pin or the back of a spoon.


2

For mojitos and juleps, I like to make a mint simple syrup. Basically you add a bunch of chopped mint leaves to a 1:1 sugar/water mixture, heat it until the sugar is dissolved, take it off the heat, and let it steep for an hour or two. If it's not minty enough, just put it back on the heat for a bit and repeat. For one cup of sugar/water, I threw in ~1/2 cup ...


2

The easy way: Use raspberry oil (preferably) or a raspberry extract in place of the peppermint oil. The (probably) much better way: Leave out the oil and food coloring and use raspberry puree as you suggested. Strain frozen or fresh raspberries through a fine strainer or cheese cloth. Weigh the resulting juice/puree and then put it on the stove an cook it ...


2

With hot chocolate the easiest way is to use a satchel in the water as it heats or put a whole twig in your cup and then take it out at the end. The leaves get slimy and unappealing when heated. We boil it to make an infusion, strain the leaves out, and make jelly out of the infusion. It is delicious with crackers or on meat. You can dry it to during the ...


1

Your main limiting factor is the butter, which can go rancid and it highly sensitive to warm temperatures. You should freeze the mints for storage until you take your trip. You don't want them absorbing moisture or off flavors, so you want to wrap them very well, using freezer grade storage bags. I would suggest double bagging, small bags in larger ones. ...


1

Sugar will extract the mint oils, I have found. It is very easy to put mint leaves, stripped from the stems, and mint tips with tender stems, into a plastic storage bag, tossing and rubbing the closed bag to muddle and bruise the mint. Leaving it for several hours or overnight flavors the sugar. You can then proceed with making a mojito batch by adding lime ...



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