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23

No, the mold on meat isn't especially bad. It won't eat your insides. But still, moldy meat is worse than moldy plants. Mold itself isn't a strong health concern. It can't cause an illness, and doesn't grow in the human stomach. There are some kinds which produce metabolic byproducts poisonous for humans, and this means that you shouldn't eat moldy food, ...


23

The visible mold that you can see is the fruiting body of the mold, that is the moldy-equivalent to the apple; much of the mold penetrates into its food substrate like the roots of a tree. Since strawberries are fairly porous, the entire fruit is almost certainly full of the mold, even though it is not visible. You should discard the strawberries.


15

If its soaked in the spoon, I'd not risk it for an inexpensive wooden spoon. A soak in a bleach solution is the common treatment though. I'd buy a new one or replace it with a high temp silicone spoon (no unremovable mold issues in the future then!)


11

Gorgonzola, like any other blue cheese, is supposed to have mold. It should have blue mold radiating from "veins" through the middle, like so: Normally this pre-existing mold actually helps prevent other molds from growing, but if you see more than one type of mold (especially a different colour like green or black), then you should throw it out, because ...


11

It's mould. You've probably seen it growing on bread. Refrigeration slows it down, but eventually it'll grow. You didn't say when you bought it and opened it. Perhaps your fridge is not set cold enough?


9

Unfortunately...I think that other answer gave some dangerous information. Sticking a raw pepper in oil and letting it sit out is dangerous. Not only could the moisture cause mold apparently but sticking something like that in oil runs the risk for botulism. You could reduce the risk of mold by using dried peppers, but botulism is still there.


7

Per NC State's Extension's article on pickles and sauerkraut (some emphasis added): Pickles or sauerkraut mold during fermentation. Answer: Unsafe—microorganisms are growing improperly. Possible reasons Fermentation temperature was above 75°F. Too much salt was used, not allowing adequate lactic acid production. The ...


5

Like @sarino and @megasaur mentioned already, it is mold and you did the right thing by throwing it away. This link explains pretty well why mold grows on the food: http://wanttoknowit.com/why-does-mold-grow-on-food/ Also, the reason that food stays good in these unopened bottles in normal temperatures is that the food is vacuum sealed, so it doesn't come ...


5

Hot water and detergent might be enough, but after serious mold growth, I'd use a disinfectant. The easiest way to do this would be to disinfect your cooker with bleach, which is very effective at killing mold on non-porous surfaces. After thoroughly washing and rinsing your cooker, make a solution of 10 parts water to 1 part bleach and allow it to soak in ...


5

You can't close them up and expect them to stay mold-free, they will produce too much humidity. You will have to spread the peels on a flat surface, without overlapping. Do it on a slightly absorptive surface, and breathable is good too. The optimal setting would be a wire rack with a sheet of paper on it, but if you don't have a rack to commit to the ...


4

There shouldn't be any significant difference between an established homemade sourdough culture and one that's seeded from something you bought (I'm assuming like the culture that King Arthur Flour Co sells online). In fact, no matter where you bought your starter culture, over time the local bacterial flora would crowd out the bacteria that was in the ...


4

If you're referring to the dried ham Jamón , then I'd say no. As a general rule if any meat has gone far enough for anything out of the ordinary to grow on it, I throw it out. For every bit of nast' that you see, there are probably 10 million more that you don't. Cheese, on the other hand, I cut moldy pieces off all the time.


4

I use bleach to remove mold and mildew stains from my bathroom and while the process would be gross, I would think that once thoroughly washed the bleach wouldn't cause any harmful effects to the pan or to future snacking humans.


4

The key here is after some judicious cooking. Assuming that you cook the meat or vegetables well (generally >= 165F is recommended; a pressure-cooker would certainly do the trick if the food was heated all the way through), so that there's nothing actually left alive in what you're eating, the question is what toxins were left behind by the mold and ...


4

According to http://www.eggsafety.org/consumers/consumer-faqs, black or green spots inside the egg are the result of bacterial or fungal contamination of the egg. The use by date is only an estimate, so if your eggs are moldy, I'd bin them.


4

If it grows a grey or pink mold around the edges, or a black mold, throw it out. That's an undesirable mold. Those molds aren't usually dangerous, but they can make the cheese taste bad. With gorgonzola cheese specifically, the mold is injected in to the cheese via needle-like things, and then it grows veins from there. If a mold is a different color and ...


4

I've successfully dried peels in the oven at low/minimum temperature (150/200F for several hours) - although this is sort of imprecise. Just check them every half hour or so, and take them out of the oven when they are no longer pliable/bendable and make a hard sound when you tap them.


3

This is what the cheese should look like. Edges on a cheese like this are referred to as the rind. Any white on there is fine unless it starts looking fluffy, even then you could probably just cut it off. The rind here and on many hard cheeses is a quite hard layer of dried cheese and protects the cheese inside. If the yellow section of the cheese had ...


3

Well, first off, mold grows from spores, and your Pyrenean cheese was likely already "contaminated" with Penicillium roqueforti, Penicillium glaucum, and Penicillium candidum spores at the cheese shop (it'd be surprising if the cheese shop isn't covered with them!). So, if you keep it in a environment habitable to them, they will grow. I suspect that you'd ...


3

rfusca raises a good point - if you're worried that it's actually penetrated deep, you might just replace it. That said, I'd just use sandpaper. Hopefully it's just a surface stain, and you won't have to take much off, but you'll be able to see how deep it's gotten as you go!


3

I believe that if you cut/scrape off the mold the rest will be fine. With a huge chunk of wrapped and refrigerated parmigiano reggiano, for example, I have been scraping it off before grating it for over 18 months now with no ill effects.


3

My family eats a lot of bread. I bake six loaves at a time once or twice a week. We freeze in plastic shopping bags all but two of them. When one loaf is eaten it is replaced from the freezer and the new loaf is allowed to thaw at room temperature. Freezing is the only way I've found to reliably keep homemade bread for any length of time. Around here bread ...


3

I've been using Bread Bags (variation on Green Bags, not sure which came first) with some reasonable success. I'm sure there are other brands and sites to buy them from. I normally just grab them at the grocery store/BB&B. I only remember the details from the green bags, but they have lining that absorbs chemicals that are released by vegetables to ...


3

Mold is growing because there's something for it to consume, the only way to prevent it from happening is to clean your grill more effectively, or carbonize it before the fire goes out. No grill is air-tight, so even though it gets a good heat blast (not enough to sterilize it as you may think), spores will get in from outside. Remember, hot air is less ...


3

That advice isn't "wrong" and millions of people keep keep fish sauce in a cabinet for decades. Regarding safety, it's generally OK to store fish sauce at room temperature for years, but that isn't recommended by government worrywarts for best quality. Still Tasty. Pathogens run in fear faced with this stuff, but it can (rarely) develop "offness". It is ...


2

I don't know about if it's safe or not, but what I can tell you (if indeed we are talking about dry-cured ham) that for it to grow mold you had to have handled it improperly. Cured ham should never be refrigerated (most common cause for mold to grow on it), stored in plastic wrap, or anything that bumps up humidity or lowers a lot temperature. If you live ...


2

My understanding is that while sourdough starter is somewhat mold resistant thanks to the yeast and the bacteria that make it acidic, it's still vulnerable to mold. My thoughts are that if you're finding that your homemade starter is going moldy faster than a bought starter, perhaps yours was a little weak in the bacteria department. That would leave it ...


2

My father used to work in a grocery store and they used to do the vinegar thing. He also told use to turn our cheese if stored for long periods so the gases would not come to the top and form mold? Whatever,I do it when I think of it.


2

As long as the kraut was submerged below the brine all the time it's been fermenting it would be fine. The mould forming on top of the brine is a natural by-product of the fermentation process. It's when the kraut has contact with the air and forms mould you should discard. I experiment with making chilli hot sauce using a similar fermentation process and ...


2

After the Big Green Egg is COMPLETELY cooled down, put a container of DampRid on the grate. We kept our BGE outside all winter and spring with the cover on it (and a 10 oz. container of DampRid sitting on the grate) and did not have any mold inside it when we opened it last week (June) for the first time since last summer. Last year we had a lot of mold ...



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