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23

The visible mold that you can see is the fruiting body of the mold, that is the moldy-equivalent to the apple; much of the mold penetrates into its food substrate like the roots of a tree. Since strawberries are fairly porous, the entire fruit is almost certainly full of the mold, even though it is not visible. You should discard the strawberries.


22

No, the mold on meat isn't especially bad. It won't eat your insides. But still, moldy meat is worse than moldy plants. Mold itself isn't a strong health concern. It can't cause an illness, and doesn't grow in the human stomach. There are some kinds which produce metabolic byproducts poisonous for humans, and this means that you shouldn't eat moldy food, ...


11

Gorgonzola, like any other blue cheese, is supposed to have mold. It should have blue mold radiating from "veins" through the middle, like so: Normally this pre-existing mold actually helps prevent other molds from growing, but if you see more than one type of mold (especially a different colour like green or black), then you should throw it out, because ...


9

Unfortunately...I think that other answer gave some dangerous information. Sticking a raw pepper in oil and letting it sit out is dangerous. Not only could the moisture cause mold apparently but sticking something like that in oil runs the risk for botulism. You could reduce the risk of mold by using dried peppers, but botulism is still there.


7

Per NC State's Extension's article on pickles and sauerkraut (some emphasis added): Pickles or sauerkraut mold during fermentation. Answer: Unsafe—microorganisms are growing improperly. Possible reasons Fermentation temperature was above 75°F. Too much salt was used, not allowing adequate lactic acid production. The ...


5

Like @sarino and @megasaur mentioned already, it is mold and you did the right thing by throwing it away. This link explains pretty well why mold grows on the food: http://wanttoknowit.com/why-does-mold-grow-on-food/ Also, the reason that food stays good in these unopened bottles in normal temperatures is that the food is vacuum sealed, so it doesn't come ...


5

You can't close them up and expect them to stay mold-free, they will produce too much humidity. You will have to spread the peels on a flat surface, without overlapping. Do it on a slightly absorptive surface, and breathable is good too. The optimal setting would be a wire rack with a sheet of paper on it, but if you don't have a rack to commit to the ...


5

Hot water and detergent might be enough, but after serious mold growth, I'd use a disinfectant. The easiest way to do this would be to disinfect your cooker with bleach, which is very effective at killing mold on non-porous surfaces. After thoroughly washing and rinsing your cooker, make a solution of 10 parts water to 1 part bleach and allow it to soak in ...


4

According to http://www.eggsafety.org/consumers/consumer-faqs, black or green spots inside the egg are the result of bacterial or fungal contamination of the egg. The use by date is only an estimate, so if your eggs are moldy, I'd bin them.


4

If it grows a grey or pink mold around the edges, or a black mold, throw it out. That's an undesirable mold. Those molds aren't usually dangerous, but they can make the cheese taste bad. With gorgonzola cheese specifically, the mold is injected in to the cheese via needle-like things, and then it grows veins from there. If a mold is a different color and ...


4

Well, first off, mold grows from spores, and your Pyrenean cheese was likely already "contaminated" with Penicillium roqueforti, Penicillium glaucum, and Penicillium candidum spores at the cheese shop (it'd be surprising if the cheese shop isn't covered with them!). So, if you keep it in a environment habitable to them, they will grow. I suspect that you'd ...


4

The key here is after some judicious cooking. Assuming that you cook the meat or vegetables well (generally >= 165F is recommended; a pressure-cooker would certainly do the trick if the food was heated all the way through), so that there's nothing actually left alive in what you're eating, the question is what toxins were left behind by the mold and ...


4

There shouldn't be any significant difference between an established homemade sourdough culture and one that's seeded from something you bought (I'm assuming like the culture that King Arthur Flour Co sells online). In fact, no matter where you bought your starter culture, over time the local bacterial flora would crowd out the bacteria that was in the ...


4

If you're referring to the dried ham Jamón , then I'd say no. As a general rule if any meat has gone far enough for anything out of the ordinary to grow on it, I throw it out. For every bit of nast' that you see, there are probably 10 million more that you don't. Cheese, on the other hand, I cut moldy pieces off all the time.


3

This is what the cheese should look like. Edges on a cheese like this are referred to as the rind. Any white on there is fine unless it starts looking fluffy, even then you could probably just cut it off. The rind here and on many hard cheeses is a quite hard layer of dried cheese and protects the cheese inside. If the yellow section of the cheese had ...


3

My family eats a lot of bread. I bake six loaves at a time once or twice a week. We freeze in plastic shopping bags all but two of them. When one loaf is eaten it is replaced from the freezer and the new loaf is allowed to thaw at room temperature. Freezing is the only way I've found to reliably keep homemade bread for any length of time. Around here bread ...


3

I've been using Bread Bags (variation on Green Bags, not sure which came first) with some reasonable success. I'm sure there are other brands and sites to buy them from. I normally just grab them at the grocery store/BB&B. I only remember the details from the green bags, but they have lining that absorbs chemicals that are released by vegetables to ...


2

I don't know about if it's safe or not, but what I can tell you (if indeed we are talking about dry-cured ham) that for it to grow mold you had to have handled it improperly. Cured ham should never be refrigerated (most common cause for mold to grow on it), stored in plastic wrap, or anything that bumps up humidity or lowers a lot temperature. If you live ...


2

My understanding is that while sourdough starter is somewhat mold resistant thanks to the yeast and the bacteria that make it acidic, it's still vulnerable to mold. My thoughts are that if you're finding that your homemade starter is going moldy faster than a bought starter, perhaps yours was a little weak in the bacteria department. That would leave it ...


2

As long as the kraut was submerged below the brine all the time it's been fermenting it would be fine. The mould forming on top of the brine is a natural by-product of the fermentation process. It's when the kraut has contact with the air and forms mould you should discard. I experiment with making chilli hot sauce using a similar fermentation process and ...


2

If your solution grew mold, it would indicate that either the container wasn't sufficiently sterilized before sealing or (probably and) the solution wasn't sufficiently acidic. This can usually be ensured by following a recipe that is known to be good, which should have factors like acidity and water activity accounted for. As for kahm yeast, it seems that ...


2

Mold is growing because there's something for it to consume, the only way to prevent it from happening is to clean your grill more effectively, or carbonize it before the fire goes out. No grill is air-tight, so even though it gets a good heat blast (not enough to sterilize it as you may think), spores will get in from outside. Remember, hot air is less ...


1

Some ovens have a plate warming setting that is really good for this. I've dried coconut flesh in the oven. Since it's so much more moist it took about 4-6 hours for the couple of times I did it. Citrus peels have less moisture and would take less time. You could also do a combination of the two suggestions here. I would start with the oven and then move to ...


1

Frozen food does not necessarily stay edible forever. There are some microbes that love (even extremely) cold climate. Such microbes are called cryophiles and can survive or even need temperatures as low as -15°C. There are microbes that show activity at temperatures as low as ~-200°C (http://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php/Colwellia_psychrerythraea). ...


1

You should be able to just scrape the mold (I suspect due to the honey in the recipe) off and continue as normal providing there was only a little bit of mold on the surface. If there was quite a lot or you're unsure about it then you could discard most of it then use just a tablespoon or two of the mother to seed another starter. Then if after 1 or 2 ...


1

to see if a hard cheese like comte is rotting, you can usually smell it but i assume you may not be used to the original taste. If it is really not good for eating, some moss will start to developp on, this will happen when it is kept in a humid place; if you are keeping the cheese in a dry place it will just become hard as hell and if it start to get cracks ...


1

Amazon have a couple: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Silikomart-Silicone-Easy-Tablette-Mould/dp/B002VLQNBQ/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1320833045&sr=8-4 http://www.amazon.co.uk/ScrapCooking%C2%AE-Silicone-Bakeware-Chocolate-Tablets/dp/B0058GI0BW/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1320833045&sr=8-2


1

I've had that happen a couple of times. I read that you can boil water and vinegar in a pot to get some of those dark spots loose and easier to clean. Stoneware gets seasoned with use so if you use too harsh of cleaning chemicals food for the next few meals may stick more than usual. If your pan/pot is not something you can put over a direct flame then I ...


1

It looks to me that most molds you find on cheese are picked up from the cheese counter where you buy them! That's the only reason I can see for mold appearing inside the wrapping. Now, that suggests that the molds are traditional cheese types, so they are likely to be fairly harmless in most cases. I cut off mold from hard cheese, the same as most people, ...



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