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19

What you are looking for is spherification. You need to use a different hydrocoloid than gelatin. There are a couple of techniques you can use. If you want solid spheres, you can mix your liquid with agar agar, which is readily available in the asain section of the grocery store, bring it to a simmer, and then use an eye dropper to drop the liquid in to a ...


13

You could, of course, create gel layers, and the determining factor in stability would be the firmness of those gels. However - and I suppose this is just a hunch - I seriously doubt that a gel firm enough to hold the weight of all the heavier layers above it (and you are asking for at least 3) would really be drinkable, unless you're aiming for the ...


13

The Hong Kong Centre for Food Safety offers the following information and advice: Use of Hydrogen Peroxide in Food Processing Because of its strong oxidising property, hydrogen peroxide is used as a bleaching agent in some foods such as wheat flour, edible oil, egg white etc. in countries like the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. It ...


12

You can get better cooling with less dry ice by using a cooling bath. Chunks of dry ice mixed with isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol, isopropanol) will give you a liquid with a temperature of -77°C (-106.6 °F). The liquid will transfer heat to the botton of a metal dish far more efficiently than solid or granulated dry ice.


10

What about using mochi, an Asian pounded rice paste? It's a similar—though not identical—texture, it's available in sweet and savory forms, and it's held together by the starch in rice rather than anything gelatin, so it's vegetarian. You can get plain unflavored mochi at many Asian food stores; it may take some looking, as it's more often sold sweet and ...


10

This one is easy. What you want is the Texturas Experimental Kit. It's a series of chemicals / ingredients from El Bulli's line of stuff. It includes all you need to experiment with spherification, gels, emulsions, suspensions, "pop rocks", and the rest of molecular gastronomy. Best of all, it's only $32!!! Definitely the way to get started. You will also ...


10

Most gelling agents are derived from flora of some kind - usually plants or algae. Since they aren't derived from any animal, they are kosher and also vegan. The primary exception is gelatin, which is derived from animal bones. Gelatin is as kosher as the animal it came from and the conditions under which it was prepared; genuine kosher gelatin does exist ...


9

Disclaimer: I am not an expert on foams. I've made a couple before, successfully, but never anything like a lobster bisque foam. So I would advise any casual readers to do their own fact-checking and try this on a small scale - at least until somebody can verify it. Now, onto the questions: I have Lecithin and Mono/diglyceride from a set. It says ...


7

This dish should taste like the chocolate you use and have the texture of a mousse. I'm not familiar with Weiss chocolate, but I don't think 57% is adequate. I would suggest at least 70%. Perhaps you should try a different brand? Again, I'm not familiar with Weiss, but is it any good? Do you like the taste of the chocolate alone? You should. If you try a ...


7

Try Hervé This's chocolate Chantilly. Water plus chocolate. Quite stunning.


6

Salt. ;-) It helps preserve foods, slows down bacteria, enhances flavor, and controls yeast.


6

On the more "regular" side, making fluid gels by setting with agar etc and then pureeing is a nice modern technique. It gives you a sauce that will sit still on the plate, but feel liquid in your mouth, due to shear thinning (just like ketchup). This is a nice technique because it doesn't appear particularly showy, but lets you make intensely flavored, pure ...


6

A foam is just a liquid with plenty of air incorporated into it. You can incorporate air into any liquid; in order to be able to create an actual foam, however, you need to be able to incorporate the air faster than it escapes. What makes a liquid able to hold the air you're incorporating (and hence form a foam) is a foam stabilizer, also commonly called ...


6

First of all, the term "molecular gastronomy" is almost universally derided by those who practice it and "Modernist cuisine" seems to have become the accepted nomenclature. The book Modernist Cuisine has what I regard as an excellent introduction to the movement and drawing the analogy with other Modernist movements in other artforms. The Modernist movement ...


6

I have used dry ice trying to recreate Heston Blumenthal's Dry Ice Ice cream, where you leave the ice cream mixture in a stand mixer that's still mixing, and bit by bit pour powdered dry ice into the mixer, which should sublime evenly and neatly, leaving you with ice cream in five minutes. I also used leftover dry ice to do what I imagined to be something ...


5

I've used agar-agar recently, and I think it might do the trick for you. A recipe plus some technique discussion is behind this link. In the comments, a reply has been posted that the marshmellow would probably ´taste of the sea´ as agar-agar is seaweed based. This has not been my experience. However, paying homage to its heritage by using some sea-salt ...


5

Haven't tried it but here: http://newmountaincookery.typepad.com/a_new_mountain_cookery/2008/06/compressed-wate.html The link suggests the following technique: Vacuum seal pieces of watermelon (if you don't have one, just put it in a ziploc bag and take out as much as the air as possible) Freeze it overnight Take it out and thaw


5

I have (and have used at various times), agar agar (powder, flakes are evil), xanthan gum, Ultratex-3, lecithin, tapioca maltodextrin, sodium alginate. Any of these are relatively easy to get started with if you just want to have some fun. This clarification technique using agar agar is particularly enjoyable and low-stress. Let's you make perfectly clear ...


5

I've seen it done with agar-agar on the Danish show "Spise med Price". They made spaghetti with lemon balm. They sucked the warm liquid with agar-agar in it up with a syringe, pushed the liquid into a thin plastic tube, which they lowered into ice water. Before they served it, they pushed the spaghetti out of the tube with the syringe. As for a flavor ...


5

Basically anything that's liquid. Fruit is very common, but we've also done herbs (mint and sage specifically). I've also had vegetable spheres like pureed peas and beets as separate spheres. At restaurants, I've had beer sphere's served with pretzel (at Cyrus) and I've seen cointreau spheres used in a drink. They pop like caviar, and that's what releases ...


5

Khymos is a fantastic resource, and has probably the best collection of recipes out there at the moment. There's also a lot of good stuff at the French Cullinary Institute's Cooking Issues blog. They've got a good post on hydrocolloids that's quite enlightening. I actually disagree on the McGee recommendations. While it's an excellent book, full of great ...


5

All you need to do is put the liquid on a spoon and slowly lower it into the bath while tipping so it falls off. It may take a few tries but it isn't difficult to master. Naturally, larger spheres are a bit more delicate so will require gentle handling to remove from bath, rinse, and plate.


5

I would try the cold oil spherefication method. Using agar agar as your gelling agent. The cold oil spherefication involves a solution which is in this case coffee that contains 1% to 2% agar (depending on desired consistency). The solution, which is warm is then inserted into a cold oil bath. Which will set the agar. Why agar? Because agar melt at 85C. ...


5

You can thank gingerol for the kick in fresh ginger, and shogaol and zingerone for the heat of dried ginger. Gingerol is chemically similar to capsaicin in chilis and piperine in black pepper, but undergoes changes when heated or dried converting it to the other compounds. You can see where gingerol and shogaol fall on the Scoville scale here.


5

Just a few additional possibly-obvious practical considerations for #2 and #3 that I didn't see in previous discussion, with the caveat that I've not actually tried to anti-griddle before: Dry ice is carbon dioxide after all, so be sure to have sufficient ventilation; Wikipedia tells me breathing too much results in "hypercapnia"; Make the best use of the ...


5

Does the term deconstructed food really mean separated constituents or does it mean improved or simplified by inspecting the constituents and recombining them differently? Yes. (As in either can be correct) It's about taking the various components of a dish and perhaps just separating them, or it may mean putting them back together in an unusual or ...


4

Check out this PDF called 'Texture: A Hydrocolloid Recipe Collection'. It has some recipes for various types of spaghetti using agar and other hydrocolloids. Since agar tends to dissolve under heat, it also has a recipe to make noodles with methyl cellulose which gels when heated. They suggest using a syringe to make your strands of spaghetti. It may be ...



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