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10

The cause is that the mousse dries out on the surface. It builds a skin of dehydrated mousse. It happens with most cremes, not only your yolk foam. To prevent it, put plastic wrap on the mousse. Don't span it over the bowl, press it on the surface itself, without leaving air between the mousse and wrap. Your mousse will stay soft. This also works for ...


7

Try Hervé This's chocolate Chantilly. Water plus chocolate. Quite stunning.


6

Raw eggs are actually a lot safer than said to be believed, especially in recipes such as this one. Rocky ate raw eggs all the time! haha So please feel free to make the mousse and eat it too! Although cooking them almost always kills bacteria if they reach 150 degrees Fahrenheit. The most dangerous part about using eggs is something that many of us were ...


4

First of all, it is extremely rare for the yolk of an egg to become contaminated if the egg is reasonably fresh. Contamination only tends to occur when the egg is quite old and the yolk membrane weakens. (Source) Now, that said, egg yolks begin to set at a temperature of 62° C (144° F), and salmonella can be killed at temperatures as low as 59° C (138° F), ...


4

In the referenced mousse recipes (there is more than one in that dessert), the vast majority of the foaminess will come from the whipped cream. You need to ensure that your cream is beaten properly to maximize foaminess, that is air volume: Chill your working equipment, including the bowl, whisk, and of course the cream itself If whipping by hand, use a ...


4

There are several major types of mousse, made from different bases, and with different flavor elements. Depending on which one you are using, they may have varying requirements. As MandoMando mentions in the comments, assuming you are using a mousse based on whipped cream or whipped egg whites or a freezer-stable thickener (neither gelatin, agar agar, nor ...


3

The goal is to melt the outermost little bit and let the ring mold slide off. Make sure they have had plenty of time to set up before unmolding. The torch will work, although I would use a towel soaked in very very hot water, then squeezed dryish—just wrap it around the mold for ten or twenty seconds. This maybe gentler than the torch, and less ...


3

I've never tried the iSi gourmet whip+. It sounds very novel and like a bit of a gimmicky way to cook which is never a bad thing, especially if you can make your friends say, "wow!" But the real trick to making mousse is beating air into the egg whites. So you gotta be confident the gourmet whip works, otherwise don't stick with it. I would just use a ...


3

I have made plenty of mousse(s) over the years, and have never seen anyone get sick. I have, however, never used anything but store bought eggs. There is always a risk of salmonella due to raw eggs. Using pasteurized eggs is a pain in the ass, because it takes forever to incorporate air, and the retention can be awful. If you are that concerned, heat a ...


3

The egg yolks provide fat and act as emulsifier for the ingredients in the mousse, helping things blend well. There are fats and emulsifiers in chocolate, so you can get away without the yolks, just replace them by weight with cream and chocolate. The whites are a bit harder. I have tried using the pasteurized egg whites that come in cartons. They don't ...


3

I've been pleased with this Good Eats recipe in the past, which uses whipped cream plus gelatin; have you tried this yet?


2

An egg is such an amazing little thing that it doesn't really have any direct substitutes. To get the lightest eggless mouse possible you'll have to stick to heavy cream, sugar, and chocolate. Gently melt 3.5 oz. of dark chocolate over low heat. While that melts, whip together 5 oz. of heavy cream and 1 oz. of sugar until it's foamy. When the chocolate is ...


2

It could just be that it wasn't mixed thoroughly - little droplets of dissolved gelatin intermingled with the cool whip would certainly give you a grainy texture. Whisking thoroughly, or even using a hand mixer, could avoid some of this. But failing that, it's possible that it's simply prone to separation. Cool whip is a sort of fake cream, emulsified fats ...


2

I usually cover the surface with sugar. The sugar melts and leaves a fluid layer on the surface, which prevents the mousse from drying out.


1

In my opinion A soufflé is something that requires heat and will "rise" when cooked A mousse does not "rise" and is general served uncooked


1

There is no strict delineation between these two terms. Either can be savory or sweet. Some common differences are: Mousses may get their foaminess from from plain whipped egg whites, a meringue, whole eggs, whipped cream, or something else; a souffle is always leavened by whipped egg whites. Mousses (except for some seafood mousses, which are gently ...


1

About two years ago I read about the "ultimate chocolate mousse" from Heston Blumenthal. Interestingly, the recipe only calls for two ingredients: bittersweet chocolate and water. Sugar can be added, but it is optional. It is all in the technique. You use an approach that is similar to tempering chocolate and then whip. Place a mixing bowl over a bowl ...


1

If you are able to get hold of it, I have used vegetarian gelatin substitute in the past, and found it to be fine. I'm in the UK, and most supermarkets stock something like Dr. Oetker Vege-Gel or their own brand (often called vetetarian gel, rather than gelatin(e), to avoid confusion). If you are looking for an agar conversion, Joy of Baking suggests that a ...


1

Gelatine has nothing to do with a mousse. That means it's no problem to find a recipe without ;) . I'm doing Mousse au Chocolat like that: melt 200-250gr (more is better for stability) of chocolate (70%+ cacao) in a baine-marie whip 400gr of cream whip one egg yolk in a baine-marie until fluffy * mix the chocolate into the egg yolk carefully fold the ...


1

The grainy texture you tasted could be one of two things: The Gelatin pack wasn't stirred thoroughly enough. The Gelatin pack was old and didn't have all of it's dissolving properties. Either way it's easy to fix.


1

If you are insistent upon substituting something for the cream, you are probably going to need to experiment with adding some soy lecithin (to make sure that the substitute fats don't separate), maybe some cold-soluble gelatin too for added stabilization (regular gelatin that has been bloomed and added when the mixture is hot might also work), and possibly a ...


1

you could try googling a mouse recipe using marshmellows. I know they exist and are egg free. I have never tried one myself but heard of them.


1

I wouldn't make the layers fully in the freezer. It will be hard to seal up and may dry out. Also, frozen layers are easier to work with. The freezer will dry out unsealed cake extremely fast. I'd bake all the cake, trim and level them, wrap tightly and freeze on Thursday. Make the sauces and creams on Friday and put them in the fridge. Assemble all on ...


1

The risk of salmonella comes from the outside of a fresh egg. Washing your eggs nearly negates the risk of contracting anything serious. It takes a lot of salmonella to overwhelm an adult immune system. However, if I was being completely cautious, I wouldn't feed an infant raw animal products. The risk of infection is higher and more serious for a baby.



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