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20

There's a great experiment on Cooking Issues that deals with this very problem. The general advice is to not crowd the pan because of the concomitant release of water; however, the guys found that doing this is actually beneficial because, although a lot of water is initially released, by the time the liquid has eventually evaporated the mushrooms have ...


19

I find that brushes and even paper towels are too rough on mushrooms. I use cold running water and gentle rubbing by hand.


18

No as per: "There are no outward characteristics that all poisonous mushrooms have in common, so picking and eating wild mushrooms requires the utmost caution. To be absolutely safe, the only mushrooms you should eat are those found at supermarkets and restaurants! All the old wives’ tales about how to tell if a mushroom is poisonous – such as whether it ...


15

There's a process in the US Army Survival manual on how to determine which plants are suitable for eating and/or hygiene purposes, but even it states: WARNING Do not eat mushrooms in a survival situation! The only way to tell if a mushroom is edible is by positive identification. There is no room for experimentation. Symptoms of the most ...


15

For larger white and crimini mushrooms I typically just brush them off lightly with a dry paper towel. Wet towels tend to smear the dust across the mushroom. I dislike mushroom brushes as they just clutter up the drawers and paper towels are always available if needed. Button-size mushrooms tend to be more likely to be dusty and are difficult to hold onto ...


14

It's not the mushrooms that are important, it's the "crowding" -- basically, you don't want so much food in the pan at once that the bits are packed tightly, or in more than one layer. This is especially important for items that give off a lot of water as they cook (like mushrooms), or that you're trying to get to crisp up, as you want to leave space for ...


14

Soak them for a while in warm water, and you'll be able to use them, yes. However It is equally important to know that you should reserve the liquid for its essential mushroomness, and yet also that said reserved liquid should be run through a coffee filter to remove grit.


12

In France, white button mushrooms are called champignons.  Before refrigeration was common, books suggested not to keep cooked mushrooms or reheat them, because undercooked mushrooms would quickly spoil.  If you cooked them and later keep them in the refrigerator, it is safe to reheat mushrooms.  Treat mushrooms as you would treat meat. Mushrooms are mainly ...


10

They're so expensive because there really isn't anything else with the same flavor, and they can't be cultivated. However, they do take some of the smaller ones to make truffle oil, which is much more reasonably priced, and more easily available.


10

Mushrooms DO require a good amount of oil due to the fact that they will initially absorb it. However make sure that you're adding salt to them right away to help begin drawing the juices out and start them over high heat, making sure that the pan is "screaming" hot before you ever add the oil and the mushrooms so that it will retain the heat even after ...


9

Alton Brown examined this question in the episode called Myth Busters. Good Eats: Myth Smashers See scenes 10 and 11. The conclusion is that you should wash the mushrooms in water. They do not soak water from a quick rinsing. SCENE 10 Home Office Know what this is? This is an instrument of torture. It's called a mushroom brush. Now when ...


8

I use a soft brush (shaped like a mushroom!) and running water. Mushrooms don't absorb very much water, despite what you might think, so it's not a problem to wash them. If you're going to fry them, and are worried about splattering, they'll air dry fairly quickly after washing. And yes, mushrooms are grown on rotting wood and composted manure. Not going ...


8

Rehydrating dried fruits and vegetables in warm water is fast - mushrooms might take 15-20 minutes, though some varieties take longer, and it of course depends on how hot your water is. It would take a lot longer with cold water. You can still do it, and possibly more of the flavor will remain in the mushrooms (since you're not effectively cooking them ...


8

I don't think you can make a Beef Wellington without the obligatory mushrooms, it essentially becomes something else. The whole concept behind beef wellington is to keep the meat juices in by being surrounded by pastry but there's no reason why you shouldn't omit the mushrooms for something else. I really can't think of any other food substance that would ...


7

Mushrooms should be stored in the refrigerator in a breathable container. A paper bag works great. Mushrooms stored in this manner should last at least 4-5 days. For the record, the top of the fridge is one of the worst places to store foods. Depending on the model it can actually be a few degrees higher than ambient temperature, thus accelerating ...


7

You cannot tell, and there is no specific single method. This is definitely one of those things that cannot just be described on a Q&A site like this. Start studying, without eating. Find an expert and train your eyes and other senses. Graduate to gathering and have someone else confirm your identification prior to cooking. Even those experts do ...


7

I cook 'em on medium-high heat in butter until they're browned and crisped to my liking. I don't cover - that seems to result in soggier mushrooms than I prefer.


7

Ok, first of all make sure you are getting French or Italian truffles, not Chinese or Oregon. Some people like the latter but they are quite a bit different. Black truffles do well cooked, while white truffles are usually only used shaved raw over a dish. When I use them, I like to use them in a situation where I will really be able to taste them. A few ...


7

The basic technique that I've found effective is to "dry fry" them in a pan to allow water to cook off before adding any other wet or fat ingredients, including oil or butter. If you skip this step, you'll often end up with a bit of a rubbery texture. I recommend cooking them in a small cast-iron pan, but a nonstick pan will do. I usually season with little ...


7

Mushrooms contain a lot of water, so you'll never be able to avoid it completely. However, you can reduce it by: Frying in smaller batches, which prevents too much water being released at once, which prevents efficient evaporation. Not stirring the mushrooms too vigorously, especially early on in the process. The tendency is to add the mushrooms to the pan ...


7

Based on my experience with dried and fresh shiitake mushrooms, and the guidance from Gaku Homma in his book Japanese Country Cooking, I'd say that you will simply get different results with fresh shiitake. There's actually a fair amount of flavor concentration that happens as a side effect of dehydrating mushrooms, and this is particularly pronounced with ...


6

Mushrooms typically release water if they are overcooked and also if salt is added too early in the cooking process. When cooking mushrooms, cook them on a relatively high heat until they have just developed some colour. at the end of the cooking process add your seasoning.


6

Yes, cream soups are typically roux-based. If you add some flour (roughly an equal amount to the butter) to the fats, whisk and cook the flour for a couple minutes and then slowly whisk in the milk, it will be much less likely to separate. The soup will also be thicker, which I would imagine is a good thing.


6

One suggestion is to buy dried mushrooms and rehydrate them when you need them. As for freezing, as you probably know if you freeze them and thaw directly without any intervention you will probably get brown, mushy mushrooms. There are a few ways to avoid this. If you blanch the mushrooms first in some boiling water, then put them in an ice bath, that ...


6

Anything will spoil more quickly if cut than if whole. It's all a matter of surface area. The bacteria/fungi/mold/whatever can only attack the surface that is open to the air. When you cut the mushrooms, you open more surface up to attack, and hence they will be affected more quickly. This is equally true for dehydration and loss of flavour (by ...


6

I don't like mushrooms much either, I've made wellingtons with pate mostly, although I've experimented with chopped up brussel sprouts with some success as well. One thing I would like to try is yellow lentils but haven't had the opportunity. You could still try mushrooms though if it's the texture your roommate doesn't like rather than the flavor. If it ...


6

There are a handful of distinctive mushrooms that are usually safe to pick, even for a layman. This ain't one of them. This looks quite a lot like a member of the Amanitaceae family (shaped like an umbrella, with white "gills"), and people tend to avoid those because they all look similar, and some of them can kill you. If you don't know for certain what ...


5

Use the widest pan you can to maximize evaporation while you fry them, also, you can put them in a very low oven for an hour to draw some of the moisture out. Don't crowd the pan, make sure each one has some space. Also, don't wash them in water before cooking! Mushrooms are sponges, they absorb liquids. Wipe them with a dry cloth or paper towel instead to ...



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