New answers tagged

0

Cannot for the life of me understand where an anise flavored spirit like Pernod would be suggested? and to a lesser degree an apple brandy like Calvados? and why such an obscure (and not inexpensive wine like a pineal) would either. There are also many suggestions to use white wine, equally confusing as it is light years away from the taste and ...


1

I guess that you heard about the advice not to reheat mushrooms of any kind and thus, to toss the dish if it is not eaten right after cooking (at least I read this advice in a book along with the advice not to reheat spinach and this advice is/was quite popular in Germany). This statement is true if the food will be stored at a place which is not ...


2

Shiitake mushrooms are certainly not poisonous, either raw, cooked or as you posit in your question, after being cooked, stored in the refrigerator and consumed later. If you enjoy eating them cold, go for it. Just keep in mind that like any other cooked food, they can spoil if not stored properly (I have some leftover Chinese mustard greens stir-fried ...


1

Shiitakes are not poisonous and are fine eaten cooked, uncooked, cold, or as leftovers. Poison's mushrooms contain toxins which cause their effects. Some of these toxins will break down when cooked, but there is nothing I can find about the opposite happening (toxins activating when cooked) Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mushroom_poisoning


2

That is the "Ring" left by the "Veil" of the mushroom. The veil is a thin piece of tissue that covers the gills of some species of mushrooms when they are young, before the mushroom has matured. When the mushroom nears maturity, the veil separates from the cap to reveal the gills, allowing them to spread their spores & sometimes leaves a ring of ...


4

This part of the mushroom is perfectly edible. It's a structure called a partial veil which protects the spore-producing gills on the underside of the mushroom cap, usually while the mushroom is still immature. They open as the cap grows larger, exposing the gills and releasing the spores which produce new mushrooms. It's pretty common to see these on white ...



Top 50 recent answers are included