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22

You should throw them out. Mussels that don't open were quite possibly dead and decomposing for an unknown period of time prior to cooking. You don't want to take a chance here. Just in case future readers don't know, mussels, clams, and other in-shell shellfish are still alive when you buy them, and they should be still alive when you cook them.


12

In the future, I would recommend the following: When washing the mussels before cooking, if any are slightly open try gently closing them. If they react by snapping closed themselves or they stay shut, it means the mussels are alive and well. If instead they react by immediately popping back open, throw them out (they are dead). I've found that the ...


7

When mussels don't open when cooked, it means that they were dead before you cooked them. Don't eat them you risk becoming very very sick.


6

The Tourism PEI site says that one pound of mussels is 20-25 mussels, about one cup of meat, and that you can serve one person that for a main meal or two people for an appetizer. The Food and Agriculure Organization of the United Nations says: One bushel of whole mussels should yield from 6 to 9 pounds of cooked meats. Percentage yield by weight may ...


6

If a third of a batch of anything is dead, I would expect the other 2/3 to be near death and taste accordingly.


4

Yes, the additional liquid came from the mussels and is going to enhance the flavor of your finished dish. All you need to do is remove the mussels to a bowl, cover lightly to keep them warm, and then turn the heat up to high on your pan and reduce the liquid until it's concentrated before whisking in your butter. (I presume you added butter even though you ...


4

Captured longer ago or not, should not make a difference. When you buy mussels, they are still alive. You can check this by trying to open one. Normally, this isn't an easy task. (Sometimes, their shells can open/close when opening the package in which they came in.) The left hand mussel doesn't look tasty, but there really is nothing wrong with it. It's ...


4

Assuming your mussels came from clean, unpolluted waters, there is mainly only one thing that determines the quality of mussels: Freshness. For all shellfish, this means alive when you buy them and alive when you cook them. Their shells should be tightly closed when you buy them, or they should close when you tap them. Mushiness doesn't mean much. ...


3

Always check that most of the mussels are alive when you buy them. Check that the shells are not broken, and that they are wet. At your house, throw away all the dead mussels and process as soon as possible. Cook (steam) as fast and as furious as you can for no more than two minutes. At that point, the mussels should have opened and nearly done. ...


2

Traditional Moules a la mariniere is finished by reducing the cooking liquid until it is concentrated and then "mounting" it with butter (monter au beurre). Mouclade is a traditional mussel preparation from the region of Bordeaux where the cooking liquid is enriched at the end with heavy cream and sometimes egg yolks, thus the reason the judges on your show ...


2

It depends on where you live, and what type of mussel you are eating The blue mussel popular in Europe and North Pacific typically has an uncooked meat ratio of 25% to total weight, and 20% when cooked The New Zealand Greenshell mussel (available flash frozen in Europe) typically has an uncooked meat ratio 55%, and 50% when cooked Around US$2 per Kg. ...


2

'You shouldn't eat mussels that don't open' is an unfounded myth. It was first mentioned in a book by the British food writer Jane Grigson in the 1970s and grew through repetition to the point that 90% of cook books mentioned it in the 1990s. The fact is, mussels that don't open after cooking are more likely to be safe than those that do. You should, ...


2

When I make a paella I never cover it, I find it keeps in too much moisture. My uncovered method is to put the fish in and cook for 10 minutes. If my mussels are small I will usually wait 2-3 minutes before putting them in, bu for "standard" mussels 10 minutes seems to work well. I use a low-medium heat on a large burner.


1

Massive misinformation thrown around here!! The only way to detect a bad mussel is by smell alone. The whole "opening" thing is an old wives tale.


1

Mussels absolutely release liquid when cooked. You might try a thicker sauce? Reduce the wine a bit? Seems like 200ml should be about right though...Most recipes I've seen call for 200-400ml.


1

A friend of mine (professional cook) told met to steam mussels extra hot, lid closed. In about 5' they should be open and done. They are done when they open. Don't leave them cooking any longer than necessary as they'll toughen up.


1

As far as I know, if you spray fresh live mussels with cold water they will open slightly. If they don't open, throw them out.



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