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7

Mustard is one of those simple condiments to make, and is fun to experiment with. At it's most basic mustard is two ingredients: Mustard Seed Liquid There are endless variations from there. Mustard seed comes in white, yellow, brown and black variations. I suggest buying whole and grinding them yourself using either a mortar & pestle or ...


6

Dijon has a strong taste from the liquid they use in it (it's not quite vinegar, not quite wine). I'd probably try a blend of some other mustard + a little white wine vinegar (not white vinegar; white wine vinegar) or champaigne vinegar or apple cider vinegar. (Maybe even a dry white wine, if you have that on hand). If you have dry mustard powder, and ...


5

Gravlaxsås is a mustard sauce for salmon, made with dill. The one I bought reports the following ingredients: mustard vegetable oil sugar water wine vinegar dill modified cornstarch On this site, the ingredients reported for gravlaxsås are the following: 6.5 tbsp. oil 2 tbsp. vinegar 2 tbsp. prepared mustard 1 egg yolk 0.25 tsp. salt 0.25 tsp. dill ...


4

Food quality isn't binary; it doesn't go from perfectly good to perfectly bad in an instant. Even if it did, the time it would take depends on the storage temperature. And for non-liquid foods, it's possible that only a part went bad (how well does it mix?). So, you don't get a precise date, but a rough interval at which time the decay starts to set in. As ...


3

What you are doing is not sterilizing the mustard. You just pasteurize it. If you just want to pasteurize the mustard: Yes, you can put the jars into the oven instead of water-bathing them. Jars, lids and the content are heated up to 100°C, so it's quite equivalent to water-bathing the jars - if not even better. Friends of mine put the jars with the lid ...


3

I came across this article. It explains where mustard get its heat from: Mustard seeds come from the mustard plant, a member of the cabbage family. They contain two sulphur compounds, myrosin and sinigrin, as well as an enzyme, myrosinase. When the seeds are broken and water is added, the enzyme breaks down the sulphur compounds. The result is the sharp ...


3

Sounds like the technique for Pelau, from Trinidad, only with hot sauce added. I don't think it has a name other than "pan fry/sear in caramelized sugar"


2

I began writing this as a comment to kiamlaluno's reply about gravlaxsås but it turned out too long to post as a comment. +1 for suggesting gravlaxsås, but the recipe does not have much to do with the traditional preparation that I am used to (I am Swedish). I found a more orthodox version here: ...


2

Expiration dates for safety are not about "usually okay". Sure, if you keep mustard in good conditions, it'll probably last longer than that most of the time. But things are labeled with expiration dates that are designed to guarantee that everyone will be safe. Yes, that means that most of the time they're overly conservative. But the alternative is to let ...


2

I'm not sure what the consumer liability laws are like in Brazil, but I expect that they 'good until' dates well short of their 'actual' lifespan to protect the manufacturers from lawsuits for people who don't read the labels anyway and get sick on 3 year old mayo... A second reason they set short shelf life for such things is to encourage you to buy it ...


2

Palatable is a very vague term. I think that some seed and vinegar preparations would have promise (sesame seeds and rice vinegar, perhaps lightly sweetened?), but others would be horrible (I can't imagine a caraway & vinegar paste being good for most things). Even a condiment that would normally be gross (the caraway one mentioned) could be good in the ...


1

You really need to add the oil slowly at first, especially if whisking. You are trying to disperse the fat into tiny droplets suspended in the water phase (the water from the butter and the vinegar). You can't whisk fast or hard enough, especially by hand, to break up 3.7 parts fat in 1.3 parts water when all the fat is trying to combine into a single mass ...


1

If by "round" you mean 60 days as opposed to say 58 for some things, and 63 for others, it has to do with the perceived accuracy of numbers. If you read "keeps for 53 days after opening" you might feel it has gone bad after 54 days. But with 60, it's a round number, you realize that there's essentially no different betweeen 59 day old ketchup and 61 day old ...


1

Yes, there is (generally) a significant taste difference between whole grain mustard and regular yellow mustard. Texture plays a part of it, but it is secondary to the overall difference in flavor. I say generally because there's a lot of variation in each, and some extremes of one type may approach some extremes of the other type in flavor. Yellow ...


1

Replacing about 60 percent of the water with rice vinegar smooths it out a bit. It's still spicy heat, but not so harsh. When I started using the rice vinegar, mine started tasting a lot more like what we are served in Chinese restaurants.


1

Make the mustard by replacing 1/2 the mustard with flour and adding some extra water to compensated for the thickening properties of the flour, then cook it off to get rid of the floury taste and there you go! If you don't want to go down the flour route you could always add coconut milk/cream or plain yoghurt instead of water which would temper the heat but ...


1

A mustard sauce is pretty much going to end up tasting like mustard, with possibly one other note if it's a strong underlying flavor. Other than that, you're just balancing texture. I'd go with a bunch of mustard, bit of white wine, bit of olive oil or grapeseed oil, and small bit of horseradish to taste (told you the second note had to be strong). A ...


1

I'd make some kind of honey-mustard sauce, perhaps with either some horseradish or dill in it. Just honey, mustard, perhaps a little lemon juice, salt and pepper.


1

Whey appears to be an agent for lacto-fermenting mustard. This recipe for lacto-fermented mustard describes a process of combining ingredients and then letting them ferment after the recipe is put together by leaving out over a few days. This recipe for a mustard seed raita uses yogurt as the fermentation ingredient, which means that you would have to ...


1

According to Food Culture in the Caribbean, the technique has no name and is common in several islands. The author attributes the technique as an adaptation from Chinese or Indian cooking. Tracking down the origins of things in the Caribbean is hard, as it gets traffic from many seafaring nations and is such a melting pot. Stews are the most common dishes ...



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