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14

"Al dente" is used to refer to food cooked so it is still "firm to bite" but not soft This is very important to pasta which should be removed from the cooking liquid just before it has fully cooked through, as like most foods, it will continue to cook after being removed from the heat source Always gently stir your pasta every minute or so while cooking to ...


12

OK I can read Chinese and let me tell you the answer: the noodles you bought are made by eggs. They're not made by rice. (FYI, there are TWO kinds noodles called "Rice Noodles", they are actually made by rice. The two kinds varies in thickness). You can first make soup noodles to grasp the texture of the noodles you bought. Try undercook and overcook a bit, ...


11

The primary difference between a dumpling and a noodle, besides shape, is leavening. Dumplings usually have either egg or baking powder to make them lighter. There's considerable bleedover in terminology here. It's reminiscent of the difficulty of defining "chowder". You're always finding a counterexample. I wouldn't be surprised if someone came up with ...


10

similar to what julio said, the main reason is that typical wheat-based noodles release a lot of starch into the water, which changes the consistency of the soup. the starches can add a dirty colour to the water, but more than that, they can also thicken the soup undesirably (think of making a roux). Finally, if there are leftovers, the noodles can sometimes ...


10

Par-boiling the noodles at home would allow you to finish cooking them with just hot water. I would boil your chosen noodles 2 minutes under the package recommended time. Then rinse and chill the noodles and toss with a bit of oil and chill it. Take this to work in an insulated bag with an ice pack. A "saucy" noodle dish would be simpler to prepare at the ...


9

@ElendilTheTall's answer would probably make some pretty badass Mi Goreng, but the whole point of packet Mi Goreng is to be a 2 minute meal in the least work possible. The way I make Mi Goreng is to cook the noodles in a small pot until they're just cooked (a little firmer than you prefer to eat them). Quickly drain them, throw them back in the same pot ...


9

It becomes quite confusing when talking about the difference between chow mein and lo mein mainly due to the error in translation. In Chinese chow mein literally translate as "fried noodles." However when buying chow mein at a chinese restaurant, you get vegetables with a side of deep fried noodles. Somehow the title of a dish is referring the to side ...


9

The short answer is yes, they can come in a curly form. There are several types of fresh noodle used in Rāmen, which can be classified mainly according to thickness and shape. Noodles are classified in shape into the straight sutorēto-men (ストレート麺), the curly chijire-men(縮れ面), and the more rare flat hirauchi-men(平打ち麺) . With the exception of the flat type, ...


9

Round lo mein noodles look veeeeery similar to spaghetti: Spaghetti Lo mein The biggest difference, ingredient-wise is that dried pasta (mostly?) does not contain eggs and lo mein noodles do. I know that at least once shopping mall food court chinese food place I've eaten from uses spaghetti for their lo mein. It's kind of obvious, but it's not bad. I ...


7

Spaetzle is basically a noodle. Throw together egg, flour and salt (maybe some water to thin it out) and force it through a mold. Anything with holes can be used as a mold (for instance, I've used my old metal colander and that would work fine). Once the dough is formed into little pieces (it doesn't usually hold together for long threads), put it in boiling ...


7

Some people prefer to cook them separately because when you do so, you can see the water changes color a little and they don't want that (mainly flour) in their soups. Another advantage is that you can have your soup ready and just cook the noodles on demand. The noodles go to boiling water, the soup is just very hot, but not boiling. That's what ...


7

This is the last write-up on the topic, and it's much simpler: For hand-pulled noodles, you need: Bread flour (wet gluten 29-30%, protein 11%-12%) 45% added water 1% alkaline solution kansui powder or (Lye Water + Baking powder) or Peng or Baking Soda Ingredients (Alkaline solutions) kansui powder 55% sodium carbonate (Na2CO3), 35% potassium carbonate ...


7

If your noodles are mushy, then you're overcooking them. Vermicelli take barely a minute or two to cook in already-boiling water. Egg noodles take a little longer, but either way, trying the noodles as they start to loosen up is the best way to ensure the right texture. Remember, you are going to be cooking them again when you stir fry them, so they should ...


7

It's true. I've done it quite a few times, before the 'no boil' packaged varieties were commonly available (if they even existed ... this was ~15 years ago) Unfortunately, I haven't done it for many years, so I'm quite out of practice. (found out I had a problem with dairy, so lasagne isn't something I make anymore) From what I remember, you needed to ...


7

Pasta (by which I infer you mean dried, Italian-style semolina pasta) is edible raw, right out of the package. It is not, however, palatable. If you soak it in water, it will hydrate and soften over time, but that is not the same as cooking it. True cooking also cooks the proteins and takes away that raw starchy taste. There is no way to achieve that ...


7

If it were me, I'd cook the pasta seperately (possibly in some of the broth), and only combine them just before it was to go out in the buffet. You might also want to take a look at How do canned soup companies keep their noodles from absorbing all the liquid in the can?


6

Many of the dried noodles that are marketed as "udon"—at least in my experience in the USA—are actually mislabeled, thinner noodles like Hiyamugi or even Sōmen. I would suggest buying the semi-dried variety that are usually packaged in vacuum sealed plastic. This variety is shelf stable, but it can often be found in the refrigerated section of Asian ...


6

I always reserve a bit of pasta water to add it to the pan. The reason is simple: if you drain your pasta and add it to the sauce the pasta will suck up all the sauce and become a bit dry. Adding the pasta water ensures that your pasta will remain moist. Also yes, it helps thickening the sauce (this does not necessarily apply to tomato sauce). Now, let's be ...


6

In addition to the reasons covered in other answers, some pasta dishes with sauces including cheese actually require using some of the cooking water in order to turn out correctly. In these cases the starch in the water coats the proteins in the cheese and prevents them from binding to the cheese's fat which would otherwise act as a sort of glue as it ...


6

Do you like your noodles swimming in water? If not, drain them.


5

I never boil rice noodles. Just soak them in cold water for about an hour.


5

The dough needs plenty of kneading, not yeast, knead in one direction (the pull direction). It's similar to pulling sugar Use regular (low to medium gluten) flour and water, let it rest so the flour is fully saturated. Some cooks will use baking soda to help with tough dough It's is probably wetter than you might expect too It can takes a while for the ...


5

I hate to say it, but I'd be willing to bet that gluten-free udon is about as practical as gluten-free seitan - the gluten is precisely what gives udon noodles the texture that makes them so special. Having said that, I've bought frozen udon noodles that had tapioca starch as an ingredient in addition to wheat flour, and those were some of the best udon ...


5

It's not too much water that makes them soggy, it's cooking them for too long in the water. Thin noodles are virtually done as soon as they break out of their dry, tablet shape. As soon as this happens, take a noodle out and test it. Remember that cooking will continue even after you drain the noodles. You should drain the noodles well in a colander. If you ...


5

They are simply wide rice noodles. Fish sauce (nam pla), soy sauce, sugar, chilli, garlic, thai basil. There are any number of recipes online.


5

rfusca already gave very good suggestions for the literal question from the title. However, you can also address your problem the other way round. First, cook the soup until your noodles are al dente (but will become just right while cooling at a normal speed). Take the big pot of soup off the heat. Second, take a small pot, and fill it with just one ...


5

Some ingredients do not dissolve well in hot water - the starch swells and thickens, forming lumps that may have raw powder in them and are nasty. They need to be added to cold or lukewarm water and heated after they are dissolved. Other ingredients, most notably pasta, will partially dissolve in cold water making a thick gloppy soup. But if you add them to ...


5

The Maggi noodles you link to are just average ramen noodles, so can be cooked in the microwave quite easily. Boil a kettle of water Place the noodles in a microwavable bowl. You may need to break the noodles into pieces, but if you're careful with the boiling water you can sometimes soften the noodles in the middle enough to fold the block to make it all ...


5

I've made rice vermicelli many times, and I've never smelled anything like what you describe. I suggest throwing out the ones you have, and buying a different brand (or maybe shopping at a different store).


5

I do it all the time, but I always use whole wheat spaghetti. Regular spaghetti is too mushy for Lo Mein. Also, in a regular grocery store Lo Mein is about $4 for half a pound whereas spaghetti is about $1 for a pound.



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