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6

Do you like your noodles swimming in water? If not, drain them.


5

Pasta (by which I infer you mean dried, Italian-style semolina pasta) is edible raw, right out of the package. It is not, however, palatable. If you soak it in water, it will hydrate and soften over time, but that is not the same as cooking it. True cooking also cooks the proteins and takes away that raw starchy taste. There is no way to achieve that ...


5

The short answer is yes, they can come in a curly form. There are several types of fresh noodle used in Rāmen, which can be classified mainly according to thickness and shape. Noodles are classified in shape into the straight sutorēto-men (ストレート麺), the curly chijire-men(縮れ面), and the more rare flat hirauchi-men(平打ち麺) . With the exception of the flat type, ...


5

It's true. I've done it quite a few times, before the 'no boil' packaged varieties were commonly available (if they even existed ... this was ~15 years ago) Unfortunately, I haven't done it for many years, so I'm quite out of practice. (found out I had a problem with dairy, so lasagne isn't something I make anymore) From what I remember, you needed to ...


4

For ramen, udon, and soba, it is not uncommon for Japanese restaurants to use multiple broths for layered flavors. My friend is from Yamagata in Japan and several of her favorite Udon places will make a sturdy broth with dashi as well as pork and chicken stocks. When I make noodles at home, I almost always start with dashi and fortify with chicken or pork ...


4

Depends on what sort of noodles, but you could cook them with less water. If you cook the noodles with 'just enough' water it will all be absorbed during cooking, so there will be none left to drain. This would probably be quicker, as there is less water for the microwave to heat up. Also, if the noodles have any sort of seasoning, draining the water could ...


3

I didn't think soba/udon stock had any animal (as opposed to fish) products in it, normally. (Unlike ramen.) This answer is based on the answer here: http://allabout.co.jp/gm/gc/216899/ (Japanese), which I found searching for a professional udon stock recipe. Traditionally the stock is konbu-based in Western-Japan, or katsuo-bushi (dried bonito flake) ...


2

How much broth pasta can absorb is really a question of shape and how it was prepared, and not that much the type of pasta. The most absorbent pasta won't absorb anything if it was overcooked. So how do you cook pasta perfectly and what is the golden rules You should season the water, not the pasta. When cooking pasta, bring enough water to the boil to ...


2

Whether you choose to cook the noodles in the soup, or separately, once they are in the soup, you want to serve it immediately. Either way, they will continue to absorb water and begin to grow mushy. (this is why it is better to refrigerate or freeze soup without the noodles, and add them a la minute when you are heating it to serve later). Because of ...


1

All noodles are pasta, all pastas are not noodles. For instance couscous is pasta, but it bears no resemblance to a noodle. Most pasta is made of wheat flour, but not all. Even if it's made of rice or some other grain, it's still pasta, but it might not be a noodle.


1

I've always found rice noodles to hold huge amounts of liquid and flavour, especially when flavoured during the pre-cook soak


1

In korean cuisine, corn noodles are made with powdered elm root as the binding agent as it has the starchy glutinous qualities missing from corn. Maybe you could see about that or try getting some corn noodles from a korean grocer?


1

Deep frying noodles is likely to create bubbles, depending on exactly how the dough was formed; this is normal and expected. You see this on almost all battered fried foods. The actual mechanism is that the heat of the oil partially sets the starches on the surface of the noodle fairly quickly, creating an a barrier to the further escape of water or steam. ...


1

The pulp is what you're actually trying to obtain from tamarind. What you should be trying to strain out is any seeds or any chunks too fibrous to be considered pulp. It is sometimes possible to add liquid and smash the tamarind several times to extract more and more (progressively diluted) pulp each time.


1

Suggestion, kansui makes fabulous spaghetti and noodles ( even some Italians add baking soda to their pasta mixture). Since kansui is virtually unavailable I learned to put dry baking soda in a tray in a low oven for an hour or so. It changes its chemical structure to sodium carbonate which is simply more alkali. I use 1/4 teaspoon per cup of regular all ...


1

I put oil in the saucepan and cook the egg first. When the egg is done, add water to the saucepan and then add the ramen and seasoning. Don't wait till the water is boiling before you add the noodle. This will save you time and prevent the egg from being overcooked. Simon


1

The trick is, soak them in very hot (not boiling) water for five minutes then refresh them under cold water to stop the softening process, then run a little hot water over them and leave them to drain on a coarse bamboo mat or strainer for at least half an hour until they are dry to the touch. You could even put them under a fan to help excess water ...



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