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5

Pasta (by which I infer you mean dried, Italian-style semolina pasta) is edible raw, right out of the package. It is not, however, palatable. If you soak it in water, it will hydrate and soften over time, but that is not the same as cooking it. True cooking also cooks the proteins and takes away that raw starchy taste. There is no way to achieve that ...


5

It's true. I've done it quite a few times, before the 'no boil' packaged varieties were commonly available (if they even existed ... this was ~15 years ago) Unfortunately, I haven't done it for many years, so I'm quite out of practice. (found out I had a problem with dairy, so lasagne isn't something I make anymore) From what I remember, you needed to ...


4

For ramen, udon, and soba, it is not uncommon for Japanese restaurants to use multiple broths for layered flavors. My friend is from Yamagata in Japan and several of her favorite Udon places will make a sturdy broth with dashi as well as pork and chicken stocks. When I make noodles at home, I almost always start with dashi and fortify with chicken or pork ...


3

I didn't think soba/udon stock had any animal (as opposed to fish) products in it, normally. (Unlike ramen.) This answer is based on the answer here: http://allabout.co.jp/gm/gc/216899/ (Japanese), which I found searching for a professional udon stock recipe. Traditionally the stock is konbu-based in Western-Japan, or katsuo-bushi (dried bonito flake) ...


2

I once made an egg-based pasta recipe, meant to be spaghetti, which I didn't allow to dry to rest long enough. Texturally, the result was identical to ramen (even without the kansui, or bicarbonate solution) because the noodles were cooked so moist. The pasta stayed pretty curly after cooking, most likely because it wasn't dried over a rack; it was just ...


2

If they seem like they are kind of starchy, you might toss them with a litle toasted sesame oil. The flavor would be appropriate and that will keep them from sticking together. Other than that, just refrigerate like any other leftover. They should be good for about 4 days assuming your fridge is below 40 degrees F, as it should be. Of course they will never ...


2

Whether you choose to cook the noodles in the soup, or separately, once they are in the soup, you want to serve it immediately. Either way, they will continue to absorb water and begin to grow mushy. (this is why it is better to refrigerate or freeze soup without the noodles, and add them a la minute when you are heating it to serve later). Because of ...


1

Deep frying noodles is likely to create bubbles, depending on exactly how the dough was formed; this is normal and expected. You see this on almost all battered fried foods. The actual mechanism is that the heat of the oil partially sets the starches on the surface of the noodle fairly quickly, creating an a barrier to the further escape of water or steam. ...


1

The pulp is what you're actually trying to obtain from tamarind. What you should be trying to strain out is any seeds or any chunks too fibrous to be considered pulp. It is sometimes possible to add liquid and smash the tamarind several times to extract more and more (progressively diluted) pulp each time.


1

The short answer is yes, they can come in a curly form. There are several types of fresh noodle used in Rāmen, which can be classified mainly according to thickness and shape. Noodles are classified in shape into the straight sutorēto-men (ストレート麺), the curly chijire-men(縮れ面), and the more rare flat hirauchi-men(平打ち麺) . With the exception of the flat type, ...


1

Suggestion, kansui makes fabulous spaghetti and noodles ( even some Italians add baking soda to their pasta mixture). Since kansui is virtually unavailable I learned to put dry baking soda in a tray in a low oven for an hour or so. It changes its chemical structure to sodium carbonate which is simply more alkali. I use 1/4 teaspoon per cup of regular all ...



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