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12

OK I can read Chinese and let me tell you the answer: the noodles you bought are made by eggs. They're not made by rice. (FYI, there are TWO kinds noodles called "Rice Noodles", they are actually made by rice. The two kinds varies in thickness). You can first make soup noodles to grasp the texture of the noodles you bought. Try undercook and overcook a bit, ...


10

Par-boiling the noodles at home would allow you to finish cooking them with just hot water. I would boil your chosen noodles 2 minutes under the package recommended time. Then rinse and chill the noodles and toss with a bit of oil and chill it. Take this to work in an insulated bag with an ice pack. A "saucy" noodle dish would be simpler to prepare at the ...


9

Round lo mein noodles look veeeeery similar to spaghetti: Spaghetti Lo mein The biggest difference, ingredient-wise is that dried pasta (mostly?) does not contain eggs and lo mein noodles do. I know that at least once shopping mall food court chinese food place I've eaten from uses spaghetti for their lo mein. It's kind of obvious, but it's not bad. I ...


7

If it were me, I'd cook the pasta seperately (possibly in some of the broth), and only combine them just before it was to go out in the buffet. You might also want to take a look at How do canned soup companies keep their noodles from absorbing all the liquid in the can?


5

I do it all the time, but I always use whole wheat spaghetti. Regular spaghetti is too mushy for Lo Mein. Also, in a regular grocery store Lo Mein is about $4 for half a pound whereas spaghetti is about $1 for a pound.


4

Rice noodles or egg noodles can be prepared in a bowl of hot water. At home, I usually make 300-400 grams of noodles in about 2 litres of water, and that serves 4 people. It's best to err on the side of more water, though. So 100g of noodles, which is a large portion for one person, in about 750ml of water should be fine. My rice noodles (3mm) take about 10 ...


4

Boil the noodles until almost done, then rinse them thoroughly in cold water to wash off the surface starch. Toss with a little oil (sesame is nice) to prevent sticking, and leave in the colander to dry out further. Then stir fry when ready.


4

Looking at your recipe I see two issues: Two eggs plus 1/4 cup extra liquid is likely too much for one cup of flour. My rule of thumb is one egg per 100g flour (that's the "cheap" version from the "poorer" regions that requires a bit extra liquid, more on this later). One cup of flour is about 120 g, so I would guestimate 5/6 of a cup. But you can wing it ...


3

As far as my experience goes, at least Chinese and Vietnamese noodles are often (if not always) very sticky and you have use a lot of oil to prevent sticking. If the texture seems to be ok but the noodles stick together, the noodles are not overcooked. EDIT: If you are unsure whether these are wheat or rice noodles: put some into luke warm or cold water and ...


3

I think the problem here is that the definitions overlap quite a bit, which is always a good cause for confusion. Pasta is defined as shaped dough made of Durum wheat and boiled in water. That is the traditional pasta in my opinion. Noodles are uaully long and thin, and can be made of any starchy material, like rice or even beans. Basically, things like ...


2

No, just soaking in warm water will get them soft without turning them into mush. Just test the noodles by eating one every minute or so until they are the consistency you want, then rinse in cold water and drain. Boiling will take them from crunchy to mush so fast that you will likely miss the window.


2

It's essential to get all the debris(seeds, large fibrous bits, skins etc) out of the pulp. I normally add a little hot water in a bowl with the block of pulp, be careful not to add too much or it'll end up watery - better to add more as you go, wash your hands thoroughly and break the pulp up by hand. Then strain out the seeds etc and it's ready to use. ...


2

Fairly impossible; noodles are thirsty. :) Ever had a canned soup noodle that wasn't soggy? Typically the closest you can get is what you mentioned; Cook noodles VERY al dente with salt and olive oil; 1-2 mins under typical al dente. Then wash with butter and salt (or olive oil). Serve on side with a light amount of butter and broth mixed in. Try to ...


2

The term "lo mein" comes from the Cantonese lou mihn (撈麵), meaning "stirred/tossed noodles." In Mandarin, it's typically referred to as "拌麵 (mixed noodles)." You can use the same type of noodles for lo mein and chow mien. Wheat noodles with egg is the typical type of noodles used in these dishes. Fresh egg noodles (preferably ~1/4" thick) are ideal for lo ...


2

While the other answers seem to have focused on the eggs, the biggest difference between Italian noodles and many Asian noodles (especially wheat-based noodles, like lo mein) is that the latter are often treated with alkalies like lye-water or alkali salts (potassium/sodium carbonate or sodium bicarbonate). This can enhance any preexisting yellow pigments ...


2

I have not made these noodles, but what you describe is normal. What are you seeing is gluten production happening. And you don't want to prevent it, it's why you put the whole alkali stuff in there in the first place! Gluten is a very elastic stuff. Dough behaves (and tastes) very differently before it's formed. Pulled noodles need stronger gluten than ...


1

I've never tried this, but if you're willing to experiment, a few things to try: Roll out the pasta, then do a bit of a accordion fold / pleating sort of drape of it before slicing it into individual noodles. (if you pleat it at an angle, you might be able to get it even more curly). Of course, this means you can't use the pasta cutter on a roller. Cut ...


1

As a Professor who teaches Asian Cuisines, I can assure you that rice noodles cannot be frozen. If you were to freeze them that would disintegrate immediately after hitting the water. If you do have extra rice noodles consider using them in a noodle salad. There are many wonderful rice noodles salads that you can make with little effort.


1

Your best bet is probably to use rice noodles (like Vietnamese bánh phở), since they can rehydrate very quickly in hot water. When they reach the desired tenderness, you can then discard the water and mix in whatever sauce/broth/seasonings you like. Some soy sauce, fish sauce, and/or sugar would work well, since they're all shelf-stable and you can keep ...


1

It's almost the same thing. Dry pasta is eggless fresh pasta has egg Dry Egg Noodles have egg. You can buy egg noodle spagetti. If you want to be vegan, then stick with regular dried spagetti and your "lo mein" will be egg free. If you want your spagetti to be more "lo mein like", learn to cook the pasta with the dried spagetti being added last and ...


1

I am not really giving you a recipe, I am give you a technique. There are two ways to make noodles, you either boil them and then use boiled noodles as an ingredient, or you put in just the right proportion of moisture to dry pasta so it finishes just right in a very similar manner to cooking rice. If you want noodles that are full of the dish's flavor, ...


1

I had the same exprience and I found this article about it (http://vietnamnews.vn/society/244993/banned-chemicals-found-in-vermicelli.html). I don't have an ultraviolet lamp at home, but the smell is as discribed.


1

I thought at first that protein content was very important, but later I realized that it isn't so.Between 7-10% is good. Some (1%)salt and baking soda(1%). 10% needs a little more kneading and more water. Two things are really important: 1- humidity. Dough must have humidity all time, don,t let it get dry. 2- kneading technique.perhaps you are not ...


1

I don't recall ever seeing regular onions in my ramen in southern Japan (but scallions, maybe--it was many years ago, so it's hard to remember). As for topping oil, the only one I ever saw was "Chinese fire oil", which was usually provided on the side for addition at the customer's discretion. I loved the heat from the fire oil but could only stand at most ...


1

This is just a personal preference I would like to share here: Size: I tend to top my ramen with things like pork slices, vegetables such as bean sprouts, seafood etc. So, I prefer a bowl with wider opening so that I can still get to the ramen on the bottom with the food on top of it. But usually if the ramen bowl is wide, its bottom is flatter, and that ...


1

Usually it's best to cook dried noodles in boiling water, and drain and rinse them in cold water when they are done. This does a couple of things: helps ensure that the noodle is equally cooked all the way through (instead of getting overcooked on the outside by the time the centre is cooked). by using separate water, you don't fill your broth with starch, ...


1

You could look into cellophane noodles. They're made from starch (often yam or potato), so it sounds like they'd work for you. If you have a decent Asian grocery store around, you may well be able to just buy them, too. You'll just have to be careful to check the ingredients, as they are sometimes made with corn starch too. (I'm not sure if it's whole corn ...


1

Yes, It can be done. Jamie Oliver is a good place to start. Here's a collection of recipes by celiac cooks Celiac.com. Plus, check out this Google Search and this Google Search. I don't have any personal experience cooking grain/gluten free, but I may be going back to Iowa soon. My cousin there is celiac, so I'd love to hear how this goes for you. I'd enjoy ...


1

Kraft macaroni and cheese is made perfectly palatable just by letting the macaroni soak in hot tap water for 15 minutes or so (keep stirring it) Overhydrating until its mush is not a problem because if you are making mac & cheese this way, chances are you're pretty hungry and you will be checking it for correct tendeness. It does taste noticeably ...


1

I make lasagna without boiling the noodles all the time! I have also made other noodle casseroles without first cooking the noodles. If your sauce is "wet" enough or if you add a little extra water to your sauce, it cooks fine! Most of the dishes I make, bake for about an hour and that is plenty for plumped up noodles with the same texture as boiled ahead. I ...



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