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11

OK I can read Chinese and let me tell you the answer: the noodles you bought are made by eggs. They're not made by rice. (FYI, there are TWO kinds noodles called "Rice Noodles", they are actually made by rice. The two kinds varies in thickness). You can first make soup noodles to grasp the texture of the noodles you bought. Try undercook and overcook a bit, ...


9

Round lo mein noodles look veeeeery similar to spaghetti: Spaghetti Lo mein The biggest difference, ingredient-wise is that dried pasta (mostly?) does not contain eggs and lo mein noodles do. I know that at least once shopping mall food court chinese food place I've eaten from uses spaghetti for their lo mein. It's kind of obvious, but it's not bad. I ...


6

Do you like your noodles swimming in water? If not, drain them.


5

Pasta (by which I infer you mean dried, Italian-style semolina pasta) is edible raw, right out of the package. It is not, however, palatable. If you soak it in water, it will hydrate and soften over time, but that is not the same as cooking it. True cooking also cooks the proteins and takes away that raw starchy taste. There is no way to achieve that ...


4

Depends on what sort of noodles, but you could cook them with less water. If you cook the noodles with 'just enough' water it will all be absorbed during cooking, so there will be none left to drain. This would probably be quicker, as there is less water for the microwave to heat up. Also, if the noodles have any sort of seasoning, draining the water could ...


4

I do it all the time, but I always use whole wheat spaghetti. Regular spaghetti is too mushy for Lo Mein. Also, in a regular grocery store Lo Mein is about $4 for half a pound whereas spaghetti is about $1 for a pound.


4

Boil the noodles until almost done, then rinse them thoroughly in cold water to wash off the surface starch. Toss with a little oil (sesame is nice) to prevent sticking, and leave in the colander to dry out further. Then stir fry when ready.


3

As far as my experience goes, at least Chinese and Vietnamese noodles are often (if not always) very sticky and you have use a lot of oil to prevent sticking. If the texture seems to be ok but the noodles stick together, the noodles are not overcooked. EDIT: If you are unsure whether these are wheat or rice noodles: put some into luke warm or cold water and ...


3

I think the problem here is that the definitions overlap quite a bit, which is always a good cause for confusion. Pasta is defined as shaped dough made of Durum wheat and boiled in water. That is the traditional pasta in my opinion. Noodles are uaully long and thin, and can be made of any starchy material, like rice or even beans. Basically, things like ...


2

It's essential to get all the debris(seeds, large fibrous bits, skins etc) out of the pulp. I normally add a little hot water in a bowl with the block of pulp, be careful not to add too much or it'll end up watery - better to add more as you go, wash your hands thoroughly and break the pulp up by hand. Then strain out the seeds etc and it's ready to use. ...


2

How much broth pasta can absorb is really a question of shape and how it was prepared, and not that much the type of pasta. The most absorbent pasta won't absorb anything if it was overcooked. So how do you cook pasta perfectly and what is the golden rules You should season the water, not the pasta. When cooking pasta, bring enough water to the boil to ...


2

No, just soaking in warm water will get them soft without turning them into mush. Just test the noodles by eating one every minute or so until they are the consistency you want, then rinse in cold water and drain. Boiling will take them from crunchy to mush so fast that you will likely miss the window.


2

All noodles are pasta, all pastas are not noodles. For instance couscous is pasta, but it bears no resemblance to a noodle. Most pasta is made of wheat flour, but not all. Even if it's made of rice or some other grain, it's still pasta, but it might not be a noodle.


1

It's almost the same thing. Dry pasta is eggless fresh pasta has egg Dry Egg Noodles have egg. You can buy egg noodle spagetti. If you want to be vegan, then stick with regular dried spagetti and your "lo mein" will be egg free. If you want your spagetti to be more "lo mein like", learn to cook the pasta with the dried spagetti being added last and ...


1

I've always found rice noodles to hold huge amounts of liquid and flavour, especially when flavoured during the pre-cook soak


1

I don't recall ever seeing regular onions in my ramen in southern Japan (but scallions, maybe--it was many years ago, so it's hard to remember). As for topping oil, the only one I ever saw was "Chinese fire oil", which was usually provided on the side for addition at the customer's discretion. I loved the heat from the fire oil but could only stand at most ...


1

This is just a personal preference I would like to share here: Size: I tend to top my ramen with things like pork slices, vegetables such as bean sprouts, seafood etc. So, I prefer a bowl with wider opening so that I can still get to the ramen on the bottom with the food on top of it. But usually if the ramen bowl is wide, its bottom is flatter, and that ...


1

Usually it's best to cook dried noodles in boiling water, and drain and rinse them in cold water when they are done. This does a couple of things: helps ensure that the noodle is equally cooked all the way through (instead of getting overcooked on the outside by the time the centre is cooked). by using separate water, you don't fill your broth with starch, ...


1

You could look into cellophane noodles. They're made from starch (often yam or potato), so it sounds like they'd work for you. If you have a decent Asian grocery store around, you may well be able to just buy them, too. You'll just have to be careful to check the ingredients, as they are sometimes made with corn starch too. (I'm not sure if it's whole corn ...


1

Yes, It can be done. Jamie Oliver is a good place to start. Here's a collection of recipes by celiac cooks Celiac.com. Plus, check out this Google Search and this Google Search. I don't have any personal experience cooking grain/gluten free, but I may be going back to Iowa soon. My cousin there is celiac, so I'd love to hear how this goes for you. I'd enjoy ...


1

The term "lo mein" comes from the Cantonese lou mihn (撈麵), meaning "stirred/tossed noodles." In Mandarin, it's typically referred to as "拌麵 (mixed noodles)." You can use the same type of noodles for lo mein and chow mien. Wheat noodles with egg is the typical type of noodles used in these dishes. Fresh egg noodles (preferably ~1/4" thick) are ideal for lo ...


1

In korean cuisine, corn noodles are made with powdered elm root as the binding agent as it has the starchy glutinous qualities missing from corn. Maybe you could see about that or try getting some corn noodles from a korean grocer?


1

It works. It tastes great. I've done numerous variations (All Veggie, White lasagna, etc.) for numerous dinners and no one has EVER known the difference. Including several Italian moms.


1

Just add an extra cup or so of water to the sauce. It comes out fine! I do it every time.


1

I thought at first that protein content was very important, but later I realized that it isn't so.Between 7-10% is good. Some (1%)salt and baking soda(1%). 10% needs a little more kneading and more water. Two things are really important: 1- humidity. Dough must have humidity all time, don,t let it get dry. 2- kneading technique.perhaps you are not ...


1

The trick is, soak them in very hot (not boiling) water for five minutes then refresh them under cold water to stop the softening process, then run a little hot water over them and leave them to drain on a coarse bamboo mat or strainer for at least half an hour until they are dry to the touch. You could even put them under a fan to help excess water ...



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