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9

Another option is Smoked Paprika. As Jolene wisely cautions, those liquid smoke products are very strong. And even though it might be "natural" smoke flavor, it can lend a "synthetic" taste to delicate foods. Smoked Paprika has a much more subtle smokiness. Of course, it will also add color and additional flavor of its own. It sounds to me like this would ...


8

To add smoky flavor, you can add a drop of liquid smoke. Do it drop by drop - be careful, it's easy to use too much and not be able to taste anything else. Liquid smoke is actually made by distilling smoke and it really does add a flavor much like putting the food in a smoker (or a big fire).


5

Looking at your recipe I see two issues: Two eggs plus 1/4 cup extra liquid is likely too much for one cup of flour. My rule of thumb is one egg per 100g flour (that's the "cheap" version from the "poorer" regions that requires a bit extra liquid, more on this later). One cup of flour is about 120 g, so I would guestimate 5/6 of a cup. But you can wing it ...


5

I would suggest either using a commercially available liquid smoke product added after the stir-frying stage. The proper proportion would require some experimentation. Or you could try using a stove top smoker to smoke the meat & (dried) noodles beforehand, (perhaps something par-cooked similarly to the way instant ramen noodles are so there is fat in ...


3

I make lasagna without boiling the noodles all the time! I have also made other noodle casseroles without first cooking the noodles. If your sauce is "wet" enough or if you add a little extra water to your sauce, it cooks fine! Most of the dishes I make, bake for about an hour and that is plenty for plumped up noodles with the same texture as boiled ahead. I ...


3

While the some of the other answers point to liquid smoke or actual smoke, I would suggest that the flavour doesn't primarily come from the smoke generated by the fire/stove, but by the wok, the oil and technique itself. Real smoke penetration is a inherently slow process. Stir frying is an extremely fast process. On one of those woks as pictured in your ...


2

Just made the mistake with regular lasagna noodles by not boiling them 1st. I cut slits all around then added more marinara sauce mixed with water and poured on top. Almost 2 cups. I then baked covered at 350 for almost 2 hours. It was perfect.


2

None of those items need to be heated to be safe, even if you eat them daily. Vermicelli is just pasta, made from wheat four, rice flour or mung bean flour. It may not be palatable under-cooked, but it won't hurt you unless you are sensitive to that ingredient. And if you are sensitive, cooking it won't help anyway.


2

Baking turns bicarbonate of soda into a weak form of lye - sodium carbonate, as you said. It basically makes it a stronger alkali. The actual baking process is safe, but the resulting lye is an irritant and you should avoid getting in on your skin, and definitely avoid it getting it in your eyes. The difference in texture and colour is noticeable after ...


2

The simplest reason is texture. The point of cold soba noodles is to taste them at the ideal texture for soba. In a party situation, I've served cold soba with pre-mixed sauce, and there's a variant called wanko-soba in some parts of Japan (particularly Iwate prefecture) that is often served premixed in small bowls, but unfortunately, this results in the ...


2

Find a good Asian food market. They should sell small jars, tins, or liquid in sachets of soup flavours. I find the jars most convenient. About a teaspoon per serving is plenty, store in the fridge after opening. Some of the liquid in sachets can be the most authentic for the Asian style, but for just a beefy broth, one of the jars will do fine. If you ...


2

If you make fresh pasta like we do in Italy you can't cook it al dente - it is already too soft. I don't know who invented the term, but it just a guideline for how much you should cook dried pasta when re-heating it so that you do not boil it to pieces. People who make their own fresh pasta will never be eating pasta al dente.


1

Whether the pasta is rolled for cannelloni or flat for lasagne won't make a difference, just make sure that the tops of the rolls are covered with sauce, too, or they will dry out and taste not nice. For the pros and cons of fresh vs. dried pasta in "al forno" dishes, see the almost duplicate lasagne Q/A.


1

I'd like to answer the part of your question that isn't a recipe request. I'm going to paraphrase it as: Is X a "thing" [in American cuisine]? The answer, my curious friend, is a resounding yes... contingent on whether or not you make it. We here in the States have the preposterously good fortune of having access to ingredients from all over the ...


1

You have bascially two options: Bring water to a boil. Put noodles into the pot and wait until noodles are done. In my experience this methods is quite difficult to handle because you can't be really certain about the cooking time (except you have done this often enough) since overcooking leads pretty fast to mush. I have the impression that thick noodles ...


1

I have only experience with pho noodles. I don't know if the pasta you are referring to behaves fundamentally different to the noodles that I'm familiar with. The ingredients seem to be almost the same: rice flour. Some kinds of rice pasta are made with brown rice flour but this is basically white rice flour with the bran layer and the germ. I guess rice ...


1

In accordance to this page the lye water only has a minor effect on the ability to pull the noodles: http://www.lukerymarz.com/noodles/ingredients.html Lye water is supposed to be the secret ingredient in hand pulled noodles. I've tried recipes with it and without it, and it does not make the dough any easier to pull. In fact, if you use too much of ...


1

To make the seasoning, you'll need to experiment. You'll need at least some of those chemicals, but you can probably find them with friendlier, less chemically-sounding, names. Looking at the ingredients list, I'd guess that the key ingredients in that list, flavour-wise, are probably Monosodium Glutamate, Yeast Extract, Onion Powder, Garlic Powder, Tomato ...


1

As a Professor who teaches Asian Cuisines, I can assure you that rice noodles cannot be frozen. If you were to freeze them that would disintegrate immediately after hitting the water. If you do have extra rice noodles consider using them in a noodle salad. There are many wonderful rice noodles salads that you can make with little effort.


1

Asia invented noodles and everyone has been playing with the recipe for thousands of years. Here in louisiana every region and even every household has a different gumbo recipe... Noodles are kinda the same, all across Asia there are a thousand different recipes with hundreds of different noodle recipes. In short, try it out and see if you like it. Happy ...


1

I agree with the answer that it does work with noodles straight out of the Box but the final result is slightly different. For years I've made lasagna with noodles Straight Out of the Box. But boiling them first, even just submerging them in hot water for 5 minutes prior to lasagna assembly changes the texture of the noodle. It plumps it up. Unboiled noodles,...



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