Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

Old fashioned oats are rolled whole-grain oat kernels. In quick oats, on the other hand, the oat kernel is first cut into smaller pieces before being rolled. This makes it much easier for quick oats to absorb water than an old fashioned oat. You can visibly see the size difference. For baking quick oats can be used in place of old fashioned oats. However, ...


11

It's definitely asking for rolled oats, not prepared oats. It's just like oatmeal cookies. It's up to you whether you use normal rolled oats, quick-cooking, or instant. I use normal in my crumbles, but you might choose quick or instant if you think the normal retain too much texture. Personal preference! They'll all work, though, so you can just use what ...


10

For my daughters, I usually have a speedy porridge process that goes like this: Oats, sugar and water to cover (we don't use milk, but it would be the same) in the bowl. About 3 minutes in the microwave, just to boiling point. This makes a fairly thick porridge, which is stirred for a minute to let steam out. Drop an ice cube into the bowl and stir until ...


9

They're coarser, so they have a better texture when cooked. Rolled oats are mushy and bland, even if you get the non-instant variety. Groats are a pain in the butt to cook: like millet, they take forever. Steel cut oats are a nice compromise (technically steel cut groats). Get some yummy groaty flavor, but the prep time is much lower (a mere half hour, ...


8

Almond milk, rice milk, soy milk, coconut milk (but not the kind from the can, something like So Delicious or Silk brand sells), hemp milk, oat milk, or many other nut or grain based milks will work.


7

I suggest that you try to go against your habit! :) Cereal bars and the like don't really need to cool on a rack: just put the baking tray in your fridge when you're done baking the bars. That way they'll set much better, as the heated (and thus very soft) sugary components can cool down and firm up. You will find that it's much easier to cut the bars once ...


6

Ironically, one of the many milk alternatives for lactose intolerant people is "oat milk", which is made by soaking oats in water, and retaining the resulting liquor. Many traditional porridge / oatmeal recipes are made with just oats and water. Oats themselves have a somewhat "creamy" flavour, and remember your lactose-intolerant residents will not have a ...


6

Yes, this is possible. From my childhood experience, oats were always cooked in milk, never in water. I can't tell you specifics of how to do it, because it was my mother and grandmothers who made them. But based on the behavior of other grains cooked in milk, from complete kernels to flours, I don't think that you need to make any changes as compared to ...


5

A bigger container is definitely the 'instant' solution. I've never hear of fruit preventing overflow. I'd guess the theory there is that it has something to do with the fruit interfering with the bubble to prevent them from forming...but I'd doubt it without A LOT of fruit. Generally I've done two methods: Reduce the power and increase the cooking ...


5

Oats Oats are among the many cereal grains consumed. Oats are very popular in the health food movement because of their high nutritional value, and they have been used in breakfast porridge for centuries for much the same reason. Oats have a nutty flavour that is an excellent supplement to bread and other foods. Oats are high in protein, calcium, fiber, ...


5

Steel cut oats take a lot longer to cook than rolled or quick oats. It's unlikely they will completely cook before the cookie is done. You could try it, but I'd recommend presoaking them in hot water for an hour, or maybe even parboiling them for a few minutes. You'd need to adjust your wet ingredients accordingly as well.


5

You might consider just barely stirring the granola while it bakes and then breaking it into clumps when it's done. Or, stir it as you do now, but when it finishes, press it into a thin layer on a baking pan and allow it to cool. Once it is cool, then break it into clumps. You can also try adding an egg white: ...


5

Contrary to what some people seem to be saying, fat will reduce the clumping effect, same way it does in almost every other baking recipe. The clumping behaviour comes mainly from sugar (syrup) and protein content. In other baking recipes, gluten does a lot of the "clumping"; oats are naturally gluten-free, but the instant oats you buy are probably ...


5

Yes, you can entirely replace water with milk. The main thing to be aware of is how prone it is to boiling over. Milk will eagerly do that on its own, and starchy water will too, so the combination has to be cooked on very low heat to avoid making a huge mess. (I think this is why the original recipe starts with water: less time with potential for boiling ...


5

If you want to save time in the morning, you can do so by doing it overnight and avoiding cooking all together. Combine it cold and leave in the fridge. Obviously, you can also elaborate on that for more interesting results.


4

Specifically, steel cut oats look like little pellets, whereas rolled oats have the familiar flat shape from going through a steel roller. The rolled ones expose more surface area and therefore cook faster, but produce a different final texture. I do like the steel-cut ones better, but they take upwards of half an hour to cook. You can make a large batch and ...


4

Another option is to pre-cut the bars, before baking. You will still need to cut after, but the ingredients will have been cut through, making it easier and far less likely to crumble.


4

I guarantee that no US grocery store refers to barley as oats or vise versa. They are unrelated, except that they are both grains.


3

I keep it on low heat after I've gotten it up to boiling initially. It will stick sometimes, but after I stir it, the stuck stuff will be reabsorbed into the water. I try to get as much stuff as possible unstuck when stirring, and then a moment later the remainder will have magically become unstuck. I guess it sticks because the water rises and the oats ...


3

If it's not burning, then why worry about it? Other than this, the usual culprit for sticking is that the base of the pan is too thin, so the heat isn't distributed as evenly as it could be. Or, if the food is particularly thick, then it's pretty much bound to stick -- but if you like thick porridge, that's something you have to live with. Some people ...


3

funny this question should come up today. i've had a similar conundrum in my house, and i recently ran across this recipe, which we tried today with great results. it uses a fruit puree as part of the binder, instead of oil, so it a bit sweet, not oily, and still crunchy: http://gourmandeinthekitchen.com/?p=953


3

Are you cooking too long or too hot? Oats shouldn't burn; stuck oats should just soak off. Crock Pot Tips: Often the slow cooker's ceramic pot gets quite rough and can have cracks in the glaze. Try an oven proof glass pot inside the ceramic pot (or instead of it if it fits OK). A hardware-store drill-speed-controller, or heater thermostat/controllers, ...


3

Yes they are nutritionally different. Quick oats have a higher glycemic index and glycemic load than old fashioned oats. In other words, they have the same set of nutrients, but are digested more quickly than old fashioned oats.


3

This really depends on the locale. For example in Seattle we have a couple of Washington State grain farms and mills that do sell their product at farmer's markets. If you have trouble tracking down a miller directly, you might do well to ask at your local natural foods co-op if they can source this or direct you to people who can help. Another place to ask ...


3

Are you looking for grain or flours? If the latter, just track down your local mills (most farms don't mill their own flour). If the former, ask the millers or other farmers who nearby is growing grains. It might be an inconvenience to farmers to sell very small quantities, but then again, you'll be paying a premium on what they normally charge, so it's ...


3

You may be interested in checking out shops that sell homebrewing (beer) supplies. A lot of the grains they have will be malted/kilned, but not all. This will mostly be useful if you are planning to mill the grains yourself. You may not be able to find much strictly locally-sourced at a homebrew shop, but it might be a good starting point.


3

My strategy: 1. Cook in microwave Cook porridge in microwave as per packet instructions (quick oats are obviously quicker). 2. Add cooling ingredients Add the right amount of cooling ingredients. I typically add a splash of extra milk and a few frozen berries. Around 10 frozen blueberries for a good serve of porridge adds a few extra vitamins, more ...


2

Around my parts, the only place I know to get bulk local grains is the feed auctions (for animal feed... not sure how it'd be for human consumption). You might also see if there's a local health food co-op, as many of them sell bulk foods, and you might be able to get them to sell you whatever the unit is that they purchase in. (this won't necessarily be ...


2

I would use quick-cooking oats (do not prepare with water).


2

I'm not quite sure what your goal is, but the standard recipe for porridge which I grew up with is 1 cup of oats to 2 cups of milk, stirring frequently to avoid burning. It takes about 5 to 10 minutes to cook, and is done when it starts bubbling. The result is usually already fairly thick, and it thickens as it cools.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible